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Quick & Easy Hard Apple Cider

249 ratings | 81037 views
Quick and easy hard apple cider, brewed right from the bottle using Costco's 100% fresh-pressed apple juice and a champagne wine yeast. Just add the yeast right into the bottle of apple juice, apply airlock and let ferment at room temperature for about 4 days. Once fermentation has ceased, just remove the airlock, recap and store the cider in the refrigerator. The starting specific gravity is about 1.050 and the ending specific gravity will be about 1.002, which will yield an ABV of about 5 - 6%, approximately equal to regular beers. If you prefer a slightly sweeter hard cider, with a little fizz, just add a little more fresh apple juice and close the lid tightly and allow it to ferment inside the bottle a little more (watch out for exploding bottles if you added too much new juice!) The finished product will be a little tart, crisp and refreshing, not unlike a champagne and much better than store-bought hard apple ciders. Enjoy! By the way, since I made this video, I have dispensed totally with the use of the airlock. It is not necessary. I just loosen the cap half-way to allow the carbon dioxide to freely escape while it ferments. It works perfectly. No oxygen is going to get in because the carbon dioxide keeps forming to flush it out. When the visible fermentation stops completely, I then tighten the cap and place the jug in the fridge for a day or so to carbonate the cider. Make sure you don't over-carbonate as there IS always a danger of building up too much pressure, causing a dangerous explosion (it has never happened to any of my brews and the sturdy plastic jugs can take a lot of pressure, even bulging slightly.) When I pour myself a cold, bubbly hard cider, the pressure is allowed to release at that time. I then tighten the cap again until the next pour. This system works perfectly (but always check the pressure to make sure it doesn't become a bomb!). Never shake the jug or otherwise disturb the yeast sediments! Watch the update: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=qcNNUkafYuA
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Text Comments (77)
Dane Gage (9 days ago)
Thanks Brother!
stubleen (1 month ago)
I did this and it was great, thanks but I have a question. I did filter out the yeast initially, and left all the yeast that was at the bottom of the jug. But then after I had a drink I noticed a LOT of yeast at the bottom of my cup. Is this normal? How do you get out all the yeast?
rmwtsou (1 month ago)
I just let it sit in the fridge until the fermentation ceases and the yeast settles to the bottom. Then I decant the top liquid carefully to drink, without stirring up the bottom. I don't filter. Filtering will probably decrease the carbonation.
Graham Macleod (5 months ago)
I used cloudy apple juice and added a kilo of light demarera sugar (boiled to combine) and this achieved an abv of around 13.5%(same yeast as in the vid). Next time i'll use around 750g of sugar because the resulting product was too sweet, and the yeast couldn't convert any more sugar.
Jorge Street (6 months ago)
hey ,if anyone else wants to uncover how to make wine from fruits at home try Corbandy Tasty Wine Crusher ( search on google ) ? Ive heard some incredible things about it and my brother in law got excellent results with it.
elderizm (10 months ago)
No sugar need?
Bryanna Upton (11 months ago)
love the recipe but not quick
Mike Abercrombie (11 months ago)
Thts dead yeast
Gaming4 Life (1 year ago)
Can u use grapes for a sub instead of yeast
Mikes video channel (1 year ago)
This makes good stuff, thank you. Also if you add brown sugar to it (after fermentation obviously ) it tastes delicious.
Mikes video channel (1 year ago)
No problem. Thank you for the video.
rmwtsou (1 year ago)
Thanks for the suggestion.
rmwtsou (1 year ago)
Pretty much 4 - 5 days, or until you no longer see bubbling.
Gregory Lovick (1 year ago)
I see you have different types of juice. do you let them all ferment for 4 days and if not how do you let them ferment
Michael McDonald (1 year ago)
for what it's worth, co2 is heavier than air. so it will keep air out. no need for an airlock.
rmwtsou (1 year ago)
You are right. Since I've made the video, I have not used the air lock. I just loosen the cap slightly and the result is excellent.
Uzman Doktor (1 year ago)
THİS İS A HOOCH NOT A WİNE
stevebeauy (1 year ago)
ARCSTREAMS ,you talk absolute BS
كبوس kabosi (1 year ago)
what time untill drink it
philip Jansson (1 year ago)
Aw that's bad. Try to add less yeast and it might turn out better. Good luck!
كبوس kabosi (1 year ago)
I did it was good but bad tast😷😷😷😷
philip Jansson (1 year ago)
that depends on the type of yeast and amount of sugar used. 70 grams of sugar in 1 Litre of liquid (about 1/4 gallon)will make about 1%alcohol. Now i'm no expert so anyone correct me if i'm wrong.
كبوس kabosi (1 year ago)
What the percentage of cohol will be after 10 days ?
rmwtsou (1 year ago)
When the visible fermentation stops, about a week or so.
Deborah Durham (1 year ago)
No added sugar? thanks for the FYI
Jacob Kudrowich (6 months ago)
rmwtsou not true, table sugar works great
rmwtsou (1 year ago)
No, because table sugar, sucrose, is a disaccharide which is not fermentable to the yeast. If you add dextrose (corn sugar), then it would be fermentable.
KONViCT GAMING 77 (1 year ago)
Deborah Durham can you add sugar to increase the alcohol percentage?
rmwtsou (1 year ago)
Nope.
UnbaisedWine (2 years ago)
TY FOR THIS...
ruffyatutube (2 years ago)
That packet of yeast you display is just to show HOW TO BEGIN the process, because you do make note the old sediment can start the next production, is that right?
Ender Wiggin (1 year ago)
Bread and wine yeast cultures used to be passed between family and friends over generations, which is where we actually get the term "culture"
ruffyatutube (2 years ago)
Actually I was asking? Did you not start with a packet? But if, when you drink your cider, you first mix it well, perhaps by the end you'll have too little to start with again?
Deborah Durham (2 years ago)
wow why did NO ONE ever tell me this reuse over and over COOL although there is an Amish 'Friendship Bread Recepe' floating around some of the bread mix is saved and just passed around to use a small amount of the same yeast again and again [friendship connection] wow the is cost saving big news. Guess the people who sell the wine making kits don't want you to know this THANKS for this info.
Kitty Praast (2 years ago)
I remember- and have used many times- a "wine recipe" I obtained from a co-worker almost 4 decades ago. And it makes some good, strong stuff! Please give us your thoughts on this (very primitive!) method. In a large glass jug (1 gallon or larger) place one can of frozen Welch's grape juice concentrate, about 2 pounds (more or less- probably less) sugar, and one small piece of white bread- about the size of a saltine cracker. Or, use about 1/4th pkg dry bread yeast. Fill with water to within 4-6 inches from top of glass jug. (Leave room for bubbling & "working") Place a (new, clean!) condom over mouth of jug, secure in place with a rubber band, and set in a cool, dry place. Under the kitchen sink is good. The condom will inflate to a very large & comical size & shape. (For some reason, children find this step hilarious!) When the condom deflates, the wine is through "working", and can be strained & bottled. I suspect that a good quality latex or rubber glove would work just as well... This is the only method I know for making wine or fermented juice, and it has never failed. It works every time, and the end product is- well, shall we say, very effective?! I am no accomplished wine maker, by any stretch of the imagination- but this stuff is heady & delicious- like candy! Your opinion on this method, please? Can you suggest any improvements that don't cost much money? I am not inclined to buy wine-making equipment, as I do not consider it necessary to achieve my end goal- which is simply to turn fruit juice into some sort of concoction which is recognizable as wine. Thanks!
Deborah Durham (2 years ago)
Hhmmm ? may try
TheTruthCanHurt (2 years ago)
Is the density/viscosity thicker than the cider in the cliquier store ? If so should you ad water ? Whats the % alcohol ?
rmwtsou (2 years ago)
+baldbollocks The density is about the same as store-bought hard cider. The alcohol content is estimated to be around 4% by volume. No, I would not add water to it. Just drink it as is.
Graeme Kay (2 years ago)
What is the part called that fits on the top of the bottle? Is it an airlock?
Graeme Kay (2 years ago)
+rmwtsou Brilliant. I can't wait to get making some hearty Cider. http://CrystalMixing.com
rmwtsou (2 years ago)
+Graeme Kay Yes, an air lock or fermentation lock.
Robin S Haug (2 years ago)
What if the juice is pasteurized? Will it still work the same way? :P
rmwtsou (2 years ago)
+Robin S Haug Yes, absolutely.
Robin S Haug (2 years ago)
So it's actually good? Thx! :D
rmwtsou (2 years ago)
+Robin S Haug Of course! Pasteurization just gets rid of any bacteria that was present in the juice. After pasteurization, the yeast that you pitch to make the cider will have no competition.
bobby sim (2 years ago)
How much of the yeast packet should i put in per gallon?
rmwtsou (2 years ago)
+bobby sim (jailbreak kings) Half a packet is plenty.
Eric Post (3 years ago)
Hey this is my first time making hard cider and I was wondering a couple things. First of all, bread yeast should work fine right? Do I have to make a starter or can I add the dry yeast directly to the apple juice? If I just add the dry yeast, how much do I add to 2 litres (about half a gallon)? And then do I shake it up or just let it sit? Thanks!
Michael Kovaleski (2 years ago)
+rmwtsou bread yeast is infact fine. each yeast strain will just change the flavor and mouth feel somewhat. use what you have easy access to. add 10 raisons to feed the yeast and easily get a higher acv. also.
rmwtsou (3 years ago)
+Eric Post No, bread yeast will NOT work! It is for making bread, not alcoholic beverages. Use a champagne yeast or wine like I showed in the video. If you are making half a gallon, 1/4 to 1/2 pack of yeast should be just fine. I shake it right away. No need for yeast starter.
Stunt Dix (3 years ago)
I used bred yeast and it was fine
Barbara Rickman (3 years ago)
Make sure store bought juice has NO preservatives in it.  If the juice has preservatives it will hinder or stop the fermentation process.  Best to use fresh squeezed juice or juice from organic source.
Muaz Tonmoy (3 years ago)
hey ,if anyone else is searching for how to make wine at home recipes try Cranstirk Making Wine Channel (just google it ) ? Ive heard some extraordinary things about it and my work buddy got amazing results with it. 
rmwtsou (3 years ago)
By the way, since I made this video, I have dispensed totally with the use of the airlock. It is not necessary. I just loosen the cap half-way to allow the carbon dioxide to freely escape while it ferments. It works perfectly. No oxygen is going to get in because the carbon dioxide keeps forming to flush it out. When the visible fermentation stops completely, I then tighten the cap and place the jug in the fridge for a day or so to carbonate the cider. Make sure you don't over-carbonate as there IS always a danger of building up too much pressure, causing a dangerous explosion (it has never happened to any of my brews and the sturdy plastic jugs can take a lot of pressure, even bulging slightly.) When I pour myself a cold, bubbly hard cider, the pressure is allowed to release at that time. I then tighten the cap again until the next pour. This system works perfectly (but always check the pressure to make sure it doesn't become a bomb!). Never shake the jug or otherwise disturb the yeast sediments!
Rich Laue (16 days ago)
As for leaving the cap loose, this should be fine. The Co2 is heavier than air, thus keeping the air be out.
Thalanox (4 months ago)
If you cap the plastic bottle too much, it'll just stretch out like a balloon. I accidentally let a 2-liter bottle overcarbonate, and that's all that happened. There was no tension or structure left in the mixture, so I had to replace the bottle, but I'd rather have that happen than have to clean up a mess!
Marshall The Larper (1 year ago)
I've been told that using a plastic container would alter the flavor compared to using a glass container. Is that true?
Rodolfo King (1 year ago)
Can you reuse the yeast?
Jose Ahumada (1 year ago)
rmwtsou Have you ever stored a batch outside of the refrigerator after fermentation once you tightened the cap? I made a few bottles without thinking of refrigerator space.
Matthew Moreno (4 years ago)
Why would the yeast be useless?  When I brew, I have racked right on top of old yeast cakes for a few generations with no problems at all. Actually, they fermented with very vigorous fermentations
Matthew Moreno (3 years ago)
+ARCSTREAMS Crashing the temp down low will make the yeast flocculate but y ou may not have the ability to do that.  I've never used a clarifying agent in cider but maybe isinglass or I think Sparkelicious....sparkelloid...sparkeltacular...something like that people use in wine. YUP!  quick net search is sparkolloid. What I tried to do was let my cider ferment until it was dry as hell.  Then I backsweetened and planned on opening a bottle every day until I hit the carbonation I wanted.  My plan was to then put my cider in hot water to pasteurize it.  yah.  More diligence than I had  and I ended up gushers.   lol  It smelled good though.   What I do now is rack from the carboy to a 5 gallon keg and pour it on tap. I have total control over carbonation and can change it at will.  I HAVE THE POOOOOOWWWEERRRRR!  Like He-man.  Let me add that I have no wife to boss me around so I do what I want.  
Matthew Moreno (3 years ago)
+ARCSTREAMS OK I'm going to nerd out on yeast for a second.  Yeast will work with sucrose quite well.  They actually will hit sucrose, fructose and glucose quite readily.  When this is gone, they will go after other larger sugars which require a heavier energy expenditure to get to such as maltose.  Now maltose does need to be separated from longer sugar chains during the brewing of beer with the enzymes Beta and Alpha Amylase! NOW, there should not be maltose in cider and mostly fructose.  Yeast will go to town on fructose and rip it dry as heck unless something stops them from doing so.  If your cider does not fully ferment and you are left with a fermentation with residual sugar, you have what is called a stuck fermentation.   Stuck fermentations.  There are like 4 mazillion reasons for a stuck fermentation and they could range from crappy oxygenation in the beginning with affects cell wall development and  reproduction, too much sugar stressing yeast and inhibiting alcohol production, fermentation temp, etc.  Will alcohol slow down fermentation?  You bet your booties.  If you have an extremely healthy initial yeast pitch, they will ferment much longer than an unhealthy, low number yeast pitch. When they sink to the bottom, this is not all dead yeast, yet some of it is.  This yeast has gone through a wonderful process called flocculation.  What is flocculation? Flocculation.  flocculation is when yeast clump together to form...flocs or flocks?  I can't remember how it is spelled but they clump together and drop out of suspension.  Some yeast strains will do it before fermentation is complete.  Something happens to the yeast cell walls with sugars and proteins that I don't remember and that causes them to stick together.   There are all kinds of things that will cause flocculation such as pH, temp, use of a yeast starter,  CO2 levels, ethanol levels and I can't think of anything else.  Oh yah.  Older cells will do it too.  But we know that the yeast is not dead because if it was, we would not need potassium metabisulfite.   Metabisulfite.  We who brew ciders and meads, use this crap to backsweeten because if we add more apple juice or honey know that  the yeast come back to action and make backsweetening useless.  which could not happen if we all the yeast was dead.  Is it healthy yeast? no.  Is it alive?  yes...some of it.  you can also backsweeten and pasteurize which I failed at.  sadness in my heart.   That's my best understanding of what yeast do with 15 years of brewing experience of beers, ciders and meads.  ALSO,  as a culture media tech lab slave.   On a side note, if you get a stuck fermentation, you can add yeast energizer which is some kind of proprietary blend of vitamins, minerals and voodoo.  OR, you can use my favorite method, pitch more healthy yeast.  IF, the alcohol level was too high, then your new yeast starter would not be able to handle that...but it will.  Sometimes you can stir it up again and get it going but that never worked well for me.    And, I'm not saying that you can do this over and over.  It will only produce good results for a few generations and I usually only do it once.  But there are some real yeast nerds out there that will yeast wash and produce slants.  I'm not that much of a diehard and I have no laminar flow hood.  But I have resurrected some yeast from a few bottles of beer that I wanted.  I have snagged up some pacman yeast from a few Rogue bottles and I have pulled some yeast form a rochefort bottle.  But I'm suspecting that the yeast in a rochefort might be different for bottling than fermenting.   All this talk of yeast and cider, I think I will pour me a pint of cider right now!  =D
rmwtsou (3 years ago)
+ARCSTREAMS That video proves the caked sediment yeast in the bottom was not dead.
rmwtsou (3 years ago)
+ARCSTREAMS Any brew will taste sweet if you have non-fermentable sugar in it such as sucrose (table sugar.) Adding table sugar to your brew will only make it sweet, not more alcoholic. Dextrose (glucose), fructose, maltose, etc. are readily fermentable but not sucrose (a disaccharide). You need to split it into a glucose molecule and a fructose molecule using enzyme before the yeast can work on it. BTW, the yeast is very hardy. Simple refrigeration in a fridge will not faze it (just slow down their activity). They can even survive freeze-drying as that's how dry packages of yeast are made and sold.
rmwtsou (3 years ago)
+Matthew Moreno It is ALIVE!!! That's why I use only a little of the remaining yeast to start a new batch. You don't need much to have a vigorous fermentation. Thanks for the video link to dispel the myth.
danielray (4 years ago)
Thats what i was thinking useless old batch but I've never even made any cider i just want easliy to make some hard cider in a few days or a week but I'll give it try ..thanks mr weird accent guy
rick ham (4 years ago)
Not bad... very easy cheap wine.
TheBiigChicken (4 years ago)
Actually, you might be taking a risk fully capping the bottle when the yeast is still active.  If there's enough residual sugar, it could explode.  Typically, when you "prime" for natural carbonation, you wait until fermentation has stopped for quite some time.  Then you rack (siphon) the cider away from the old yeast into a new container.  To prime, use 1 cup of sugar for every 5 gallons and use bottles designed to handle pressure. The apple juice container is not designed for that, but a soda bottle is.
Douglas Hunton (1 year ago)
ARCSTREAMS
Matty M (3 years ago)
+ARCSTREAMS The yeast are not dead. They have just ran out of stuff to consume and are essentially dormant.
jim (4 years ago)
Good vid but honestly the yeast from your previous batch is damn near useless
John Storrs (1 year ago)
I thought that the sediment left over after fermentation was dead yeast, that's where "brewer's yeast" or "food yeast" came from.
Nelson Abreu (4 years ago)
You are incorrect, many pros use "starter" from the last batch.  The yeast is dormant and waiting for more sugar to feed on.  It's an excellent choice if you really like the flavor of a particular batch, but due to genetic drift, the flavor will change over time, so after a few dozen batches you may notice a change in flavor profile. While this was an extremely basic video, this method is an excellent way for someone to cheaply dip their toes into home brewing. Thank you OP for the video, I'm sure it will help many.
peter heighes (5 years ago)
great vid.

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