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Silent Disease: Osteoporosis and Men
 
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CEDAR RAPIDS, IA (CBS2/FOX28) - Chances are, you know someone whos dealt with osteoporosis, but when you think of that person, are you thinking of a man? Osteoporosis might be thought of as a womans issue, but men are twice as likely to die from complications related to it. Gary Clemons has been walking ever since he started chasing his big brothers shadows. They said, either you keep up with us, or you get left behind. What do you do? You learn to walk fast! he says, laughing. But these days, the 62-year-old has a different reason to keep up hes trying to stay on top of his osteoporosis. She says, youve got a lower disc in your back thats decaying away, he says, referring to his doctor. So, every day, Gary walks, to support his back, and his bones. Doctor Arun Movva says Gary is prime example of a disease thats on the rise. Dr. Movva tells us, Every day I see at least one osteoporosis patient at least one! Osteoporosis can be a complicated diagnosis. But the short version is its a disease that makes your bones weak and more likely to break. Its a silent disease, meaning you dont have any symptoms, and then you break a bone, Dr. Movva says. But you mightve noticed the literature, the meds, and the ads are geared toward women Dr. Movva says, It used to be somewhat of a stigma, thinking that osteoporosis is a womans disease and its related to menopause. But now we know more about osteoporosis, especially in men, and we are finding more and more bone loss in men, compared to before. He says men, might need to actually be more aware of osteoporosis. Thats because one in four will break a bone after they reach 50 in fact, men are more likely to get osteoporosis after that age, than to get prostate cancer. And the scariest part men are more likely than women to die within a year after breaking a hip, due to problems related to the break. We dont know exactly why that happens, but that is the most concerning part of this whole thing, cautions Dr. Movva. Fortunately, there are new medicines to help work on the problem. One actually forms new bones, others prevent bone loss. And there are things you can do now, to keep bones healthy later. Doctor Movva says 1) get calcium and vitamin d 2) stop smoking and limit alcohol use and 3) do weight-bearing exercise Any kind of walk is good for the bones, he says. Like Garys choice Im just walkin around and doing my exercises! he laughs. Following those simple step, could mean a less painful route, later on down the road. Dr. Movva stresses this is a silent disease, so he says its a good idea once you reach a certain age, to start getting a bone density test, along with some of the other routine ones, each time you see your doctor. When you begin those routines, really depends on you. As always, he says, talk to your doctor.
Views: 1693 KGAN CBS 2
Osteoporosis and Resistance Exercise
 
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This video explains what osteoporosis is, its prevalence in Canada and treatments options including resistance exercise. Osteoporosis is a common disease, especially among older women, that is a result of low bone mass. In Canada one in three women and one in five men are diagnosed with osteoporosis in their lifetimes. Guidelines for managing osteoporosis recommend resistance and balance training exercises as part of treatment. Video by Muhammad Mateen, Karam Noel, Meena Al Saigh and Michael Romaniuk Copyright McMaster University 2017 Please let us know below how you liked this video and suggest additional topics for us to attempt to demystify.
Views: 1307 Demystifying Medicine
New Drugs Improve Osteoporosis Treatment
 
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An estimated 44 million people in the United States, and more than half the population over age 50, have osteoporosis or its precursor, osteopenia. But new medications, a focus on increased intake of calcium and vitamin D, and more vigilant assessment of bone-mineral density and future fracture risk are among the latest treatments for the skeletal disorder, which is characterized by compromised bone strength that predisposes a person to greater risk of fracture. This is a very common problem. Patients should discuss their risks with their physicians, says UCLA endocrinologist Sheila Ahmadi, M.D. About half of all white women will experience a fracture associated with osteoporosis in her lifetime. Osteoporosis also occurs in older men, who are less likely to be screened or treated for the condition, and who have a higher death rate as a consequence of hip fractures. Regular weight-bearing exercise and getting adequate amounts of calcium and vitamin D can help prevent the development of osteoporosis, and should start at an early age, says Aurelia Nattiv, M.D., director of the UCLA Osteoporosis Center in Santa Monica. People used to think of osteoporosis as a geriatric problem, but bone health begins in childhood, she says. Adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D are particularly important preventative factors. The National Osteoporosis Foundation updated recommended daily requirements in 2008: 1,200 mg of calcium and 800-1,000 IU of vitamin D for adults 50 years or older; 1,000 mg of calcium and 400-800 IU of vitamin D for adults under 50; and 1,300 mg of calcium and 400 IU of vitamin D for children and adolescents ages 9-18. Doses for younger children vary by age. Most people, however, fail to meet the recommended daily requirements, and daily supplements often are necessary to reach those levels, Dr. Nattiv says. Most current guidelines recommend screening for osteoporosis in all women over the age of 65 and for younger women and older men with risk factors for osteoporosis. The gold standard for diagnosis, assessment of risk and monitoring of treatment is dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), a noninvasive scan. Several drugs can slow and in some cases reverse the process of bone loss. The mainstays are the drugs known as bisphosphonates — pills that are taken daily, weekly or in some cases monthly. A once-a-year injectable medication also is available, and other promising new drugs are currently in clinical trials. Despite the growing number of treatment options, a general lack of awareness about osteoporosis seems to exist among large segments of the at-risk population, says geriatrician Deborah Kado, M.D. Osteoporosis, much like hypertension, is something you can walk around with and not realize you have, Dr. Kado explains. Many people dont know they have low bone density until they have a fracture — and even then, they may not realize that there is more that can and should be done than getting a cast or having surgery. Read more at www.uclahealth.org/vitalsigns
Views: 16273 UCLA Health
Treating Osteoporosis or Low Bone Density
 
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ACP has published an evidence-based clinical practice guideline http://bit.ly/2pUrLhu for treating low bone density or osteoporosis to prevent fractures in women and men. ACP’s treatment recommendations include generic bisphosphonates or denosumab and a recommendation against bone density monitoring during treatment.
Dr. Max Gomez: Osteoporosis In Men
 
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There is a push underway to add men to osteoporosis screening guidelines. CBS2's Dr. Max Gomez explains.
Views: 96 CBS New York
How to increase bone density | Improve Osteoporosis exercises, treatment, symptoms, causes
 
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🔥 FREE 6 Week Challenge: https://gravitychallenges.com/home65d4f?utm_source=ytube&utm_term=bone Fat Loss Calculator: http://bit.ly/2O4WHoZ how to increase bone density how to improve bone density low bone density Osteoporosis symptoms osteoporosis causes what causes osteoporosis exercises for osteoporosis Osteopenia Treatment Would you like to learn how to increase bone density? In this weeks video, I tackle Osteoporosis and offer some solutions to this degenerative disease. The facts: 1-2 females will have osteopenia or osteoporosis 1-5 males will have osteopenia or osteoporosis People will lose bone density because of: 1. Aging/sedentary lifestyle 2. Lack of a wide variety of proper nutrients; not just calcium 3. Certain medicine such as blood thinners, and certain anti inflammatory medicine Here are some solutions: Eat more vegetables. I always say that you can eat an unlimited amount of green veggies and this applies more than ever in this video. Spinach and kale are great. Have a minimum of 5 cups of veggies per day. Veggies are alkaline and will naturally decrease inflammation in our body. An adult needs 1000-1300mg of calcium per day If you think that milk is your answer for how to improve bone density you're wrong. There have been studies done that even though the milk we've been drinking for generations does have a lot of calcium, it does not necessarily lead to strong bones as the ads have claimed Calcium from milk and other animal products is absorbed at a much smaller rate than from plant based products. Beans, nuts, and especially green vegetables like kale have been shown to have a better effect on calcium absorption than milk. Just because its got a lot of calcium doesn't mean your body is absorbing all that calcium. Also eat more omega 3 fatty acids to help the absorption of calcium. Now lets get to what really works 100% of the time to increase bone density, recover from low bone density, and prevent you from ever losing it again...Exercise!!!! Many doctors believe in walking or running to increase bone density, but...I don't believe this is going to give you the results you want. I know a doctor being wrong about something and a trainer being right...mind blowing. Having extra weight on your bones, joints, and muscles during exercises is not only beneficial, but necessary for your survival. I'm sure you've heard the saying, "if you don't use it you lose it." Well the reason that you're losing bone density is because your not using it. Great movements to increase bone density are Squats, Lunges, push ups, and really almost any other basic weight bearing exercises I can think of. Start with low weight or just your body weight in the beginning and work your way up. Your bone density will improve more as you increase your weight and overall intensity over time. http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music how to increase bone density | how to improve bone density | low bone density | Osteoporosis symptoms | osteoporosis causes | what causes osteoporosis | exercises for osteoporosis | what is osteoporosis | how to fix osteoporosis | how to cure osteoporosis | how | to | increase | bone | density | Improve | Low | Osteoporosis | symptoms | causes | exercises | fix | cure | personal training West Freehold, NJ | Personal trainer West freehold, NJ |
Osteoporosis: Prevention and Treatment
 
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Over 50% of women and 25% of men over the age of 50 will sustain a fragility fracture due to osteoporosis. This talk addresses risk factors, prevention and treatment options, as well as common questions about lifestyle, dietary supplements, and medications. The latest in osteoporosis research is discussed. Speaker: Joy Wu, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Endocrinology, Gerontology and Metabolism, Stanford University Medical Center
Views: 10214 Stanford Health Care
OSTEOPOROSIS: Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention, Gary Kraus MD Back and Neck Houston, TX
 
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OSTEOPOROSIS: CAUSES, DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND PREVENTION http://spinehealth.com/blog/osteoporosis-in-men/ Osteoporosis can be very debilitating, resulting in significant pain and decreased quality of live, due to bone fractures resulting from it. Osteoporosis typically results in a patient experiencing fractures of the spine, hips, ribs and wrists. There are measures which an individual can take to try to prevent osteoporosis, as well as treat it. This video reviews the causes, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. Lifestyle changes can improve osteoporosis. Physical activity, especially resistance training, can strengthen bones. Good nutrition is essential. Excessive drinking of alcohol, as well as smoking, are factors which can increase osteoporosis. If you have a question which you would like to ask Dr. Kraus, send him a comment at the contact form at http://www.spinehealth.com/contact-us.php In the box asking for insurance information, simply type in "Ask Dr. Kraus" Dr. Kraus has provided extensive information on the subjects of low back pain, neck pain, spine surgery, epidural steroid injections, physical medicine, brain tumors, brain surgery, and a number of other areas of healthcare as they relate to the spine and brain. Additional information about these topics, as well as information about Dr. Kraus, can be found at http://www.spinehealth.com http://www.spinesurgery.com http://www.spinesurgeons.com/surgeons/houston/gary-kraus-1/ Dr. Gary Kraus is a neurosurgeon located in Houston, TX. Dr. Kraus is the founder and chairman of the Kraus Back and Neck Institute in Houston, TX. In addition, he is Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston. Dr. Kraus is past Chairman of Neurosurgery, Memorial Hermann Memorial City Hospital, and past Medical Director of Neurosciences and Gamma Knife at West Houston Medical Center. Dr. Kraus has been a practicing neurosurgeon for twenty three years and is Board Certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery. He is the author of the internationally acclaimed text Microsurgical Anatomy of the Brain: A Stereo Atlas. He has written numerous articles for the peer-reviewed neurosurgical literature, as well as chapters in neurosurgical textbooks and is co-author of the medical thriller Body Trade, the prequel to Body Trade: Unexpected. Dr. Kraus earned a BS in physics and electrical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and his MD from the SUNY/Stony Brook. He completed a residency in neurosurgery at the St. Louis University School of Medicine and a fellowship in neurovascular-skull base surgery at the Barrow Neurological Institute. Dr. Kraus has been listed numerous times in Best Doctors in America, Castle Connolly, featured in Newsweek Magazine as a “Top Doctor in Texas,” and named a "Top Doc in Houston, Texas" by H. Texas Magazine for the years 2007 to 2016.
How To Treat Osteoporosis WITHOUT Toxic Drugs
 
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1 in 5 men over the age of 50 will sustain a fracture that is related to osteoporosis. Within 12 months of a hip fracture, 30% of these men will be dead. What does mainstream medicine want you to do about this problem? Take drugs. DUH! These drugs have devastating side effects. Please share this video with those you care about. Please leave a comment below this video and we will be sure to respond! If you find this information helpful, please "Share" it with your friends and family by clicking the "Share" button below this video. Also, if you could give this video a "Thumbs Up" we would really appreciate it! *CONSULTATIONS AVAILABLE OVER THE PHONE OR SKYPE - SEE BELOW* Want a one-on-one consultation with Dr. Gerhauser? Click here for more information: http://www.naturalfoodsdiet.org/phone-consultations/ Get Dr. Gerhauser's Free E-Book "7 Steps To Natural Health": http://www.naturalfoodsdiet.org/
10 Ways to Prevent or Reverse Osteoporosis
 
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Half of all women will have osteoporosis by age 60. One in five women will have a hip fracture in her lifetime, and 50% of them will never walk again. Men are not immune to this problem. 30% of osteoporosis happens in males, source : www.wallerwellness.com ------- Article-TUBE2 is informational and learning portal for raising awareness for healthy food and wellness portal that today is a treasure of information. Daily are publishing new information in the field of nutrition, current information and educational content deployed in several thematic areas like: Natural Remedies, Diet and Weight loss, Health Benefits of Fruits and Vegetables, Healthy Recipes, Health Tips and many more. contact us www.facebook.com/misha.barca FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/tabkhat twitter www.twitter.com/miamolosiva www.article-tube.com
Views: 2919 Article-TUBE2
8 Signs and Symptoms of Osteoporosis in Men
 
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Like, Comment, Subscribe and invite all your friends to see our videos. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUOF1_1_fY50PVN0TtItbDQ?sub_confirmation=1 8 Signs and Symptoms of Osteoporosis in Men It can be hard to know when we’re at risk for bone loss and deterioration otherwise known as osteoporosis. Unlike skin problems or internal issues, we can’t always see what’s affecting our bones. However, there are ways for men to determine if they’re at risk of developing osteoporosis, a significant health issue affecting older men and women. Let’s take a look at the top signs and symptoms of serious bone loss and deterioration in male patients… 1. Muscle Pain and Cramps When you think of osteoporosis, you think of pain emanating from the bones, not muscles. But muscle pain and cramps can be a sign that one is experiencing bone loss in both men and women, claims WebMD. In fact, many people confuse pain associated with bone loss with muscle pain. That’s why it’s important to see your doctor and explore the pain in closer detail. Be sure to take your time and carefully describe the problem. If your doctor isn’t willing to take the time to make a proper diagnosis, consider getting a second opinion. 2. Difficulty Keeping Active Most health experts recommend adults get at least 30-minutes of moderately intense physical activity each day. But that can be a difficult goal to accomplish in men feeling pain or discomfort. If you’re finding physical activity difficult due to pain in your back or joints, it’s time to see a physician. Consider talking to your family members about a family history of osteoporosis or bone loss. Dealing with the issue early can help you manage pain and keep it under control in the future. 3. Vitamin D Deficiency Having low vitamin D levels isn’t a sign of osteoporosis, but it can be a factor in the loss of adequate bone density. In fact, males with vitamin D deficiency are more likely to experience osteoporosis, says reserach from the International Osteoperosis Foundation. That’s why experts insist men, and particularly men over age 50, have their vitamin D levels checked regularly. To correct a problem, often all it takes is a little more exposure to sunlight or a daily supplement. 4. Fingernails that Break Easily Those who take care of their fingernails will tell you there’s nothing more annoying than having a nail suddenly break. But there’s more to this than cosmetics. Weak or brittle fingernails can actually be a sign of osteoporosis in both men and women. That said, sometimes nails are exposed to conditions that weaken them, and them alone. If you frequently find yourself digging in the garden, using harsh chemicals, or working with your hands, your bones may not be the problem. 5. Loss of Height Many of us problem know older people who have gotten shorter with age. It’s an issue that has a lot to do with osteoporosis and bone loss. As the bones begin to decline in quality, our height can appear diminished, and we may even appear to shrink, says Dr. Susan E. Brown, of the Cener for Better Bones. That’s why it’s important to have regular checkups with your doctor. Older men and women should insist on having their height recorded. If there’s a decline, talk to your doctor about links to osteoporosis. 6. Poor Posture Growing up, many of us were told to stand up straight, particularly when addressing our elders and superiors. When we entered the working world, it became important to sit up straight, maintaining a professional-looking posture. The problem is, as our bones begin to deteriorate our posture is directly affected, claims reserach from the Univeristy of California, San Francisco. If you’ve been told that you appear to be slouching a lot (either when you’re sitting or standing) talk to your doctor about links to osteoporosis. 7. Gum Problems The first sign of osteoporosis may not have anything to do with your bones or joints. In fact, the first visible sign of significant bone deterioration may be visible in one of the last place you’d think to see it—inside your mouth. The receding of gum tissue (or periodontitis) is often the first sign of osteoporosis, according to reasearch from the National Institutes of Health. That’s because the decline of jaw bone density can result in the receding of gums. That’s why people with a family history of osteoporosis should include their dentist in any conversations about bone loss. 8. Issues with Grip Are you having a hard time gripping your golf clubs this spring? Was your last visit to the batting cage a painful affair? These problems with your grip may be an indication that osteoporosis is setting in. The good news is that you can work on strengthening your grip and the muscles and bones in your hand through simple strength exercises. Talk to your doctor about how you can build your grip strength.
Views: 332 STAY HEALTHY
Osteoporosis: Protecting Bones, Preventing Breaks | MedscapeTV
 
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Worldwide, osteoporosis leads to nearly 9 million fractures annually—a fracture every 3 seconds. One in 3 women and 1 in 5 men over the age of 50 will experience an osteoporotic fracture. Associated mortality can reach 20% in the first 12 months after hip fracture. With an aging population, the incidence of hip fracture alone in parts of Asia and Western Europe is projected to increase by 240% in women and 310% in men. An insidious condition, osteoporosis can profoundly affect human health, especially among the already vulnerable senior population most at risk. Pain, disability, difficulty with breathing, and dependency on services can all result with a fracture. Yet, the great majority of individuals who have experienced at least one osteoporotic fracture, and who are at high risk for future fractures, are neither identified nor treated for osteoporosis.
Views: 588 Medscape
Osteoporosis in Men
 
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This article will be discussing osteoporosis in men. How they get it, the causes of osteoporosis in men, the difference between male and female osteoporosis, the risk factors, how osteoporosis is treated…. and lastly, we will address what the commons questions are for men with osteoporosis. First, what is osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a disease in which the bones become brittle and weak due to deterioration of bone tissue. The bones are known as ‘porous’. Common areas of osteoporosis are the hip, spine and femur. Osteoporosis is also known as the “silent disease” because there are no signs or symptoms. So how do men get osteoporosis? For the full article, go here: https://www.algaecal.com/expert-insights/osteoporosis-in-men/
Views: 310 AlgaeCal
8 Signs and Symptoms of Osteoporosis in Men
 
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8 Signs and Symptoms of Osteoporosis in Men 1. Muscle Pain and Cramps When you think of osteoporosis, you think of pain emanating from the bones, not muscles. But muscle pain and cramps can be a sign that one is experiencing bone loss in both men and women, claims WebMD. In fact, many people confuse pain associated with bone loss with muscle pain. That’s why it’s important to see your doctor and explore the pain in closer detail. Be sure to take your time and carefully describe the problem. If your doctor isn’t willing to take the time to make a proper diagnosis, consider getting a second opinion. 2. Difficulty Keeping Active Most health experts recommend adults get at least 30-minutes of moderately intense physical activity each day. But that can be a difficult goal to accomplish in men feeling pain or discomfort. If you’re finding physical activity difficult due to pain in your back or joints, it’s time to see a physician. Consider talking to your family members about a family history of osteoporosis or bone loss. Dealing with the issue early can help you manage pain and keep it under control in the future. 3. Vitamin D Deficiency Having low vitamin D levels isn’t a sign of osteoporosis, but it can be a factor in the loss of adequate bone density. In fact, males with vitamin D deficiency are more likely to experience osteoporosis, says reserach from the International Osteoperosis Foundation. That’s why experts insist men, and particularly men over age 50, have their vitamin D levels checked regularly. To correct a problem, often all it takes is a little more exposure to sunlight or a daily supplement. 4. Fingernails that Break Easily Those who take care of their fingernails will tell you there’s nothing more annoying than having a nail suddenly break. But there’s more to this than cosmetics. Weak or brittle fingernails can actually be a sign of osteoporosis in both men and women. That said, sometimes nails are exposed to conditions that weaken them, and them alone. If you frequently find yourself digging in the garden, using harsh chemicals, or working with your hands, your bones may not be the problem. 5. Loss of Height 6. Poor Posture 7. Gum Problems 8. Issues with Grip
Views: 237 HEALTH AREA
How To Prevent Osteoporosis - How To Treat Osteoporosis Without Medication 💀
 
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How to prevent osteoporosis How To Treat Osteoporosis Without Medication Osteoporosis is dangerous to life and limb. The bone-thinning disease is a serious condition. Osteoporosis is more than just a natural aging process. “It’s really a disease process that makes your bones become weak and fragile. Did you know that that 50 percent of women in the U.S. age 50 or older will break a bone, due to osteoporosis? Overall, about 54 million Americans have osteoporosis—a gradual thinning out of the bones—or low bone density, which may lead to fracture. Bone loss is a gradual process that can be slowed with some simple lifestyle practices. The following are tips for slowing or preventing osteoporosis: how to treat osteoporosis naturally 1. Engage in Weight-Bearing Exercise Weight-bearing and muscle-strengthening exercises stimulate bone formation and slow age-related bone loss. Some weight-bearing activities include: Walking Jogging Jumping rope how to treat osteoporosis without medication 2.Eat Plants and Fermented Foods Many fruits and vegetables contain a number of bone-friendly nutrients, including calcium, magnesium, potassium, vitamin K, vitamin C, and protein. Edible plants also provide anti-inflammatory agents and antioxidants, which counter inflammation and oxidative stress, respectively — two cellular conditions associated with aging and many chronic diseases, including osteoporosis. best way to reverse osteoporosis 3.Phosphorus: This supports building bone and other tissue during growth. There is a wide availability of this in foods, so it is not difficult to get adequate amounts in. Sources of phosphorus are: how can osteoporosis be prevented Dairy foods: milk, cheese, and yogurt what to take for osteoporosis Meat Baked goods Cereal Eggs Nuts Fish Soda osteoporosis natural treatments that work 4. Don’t Forget Vitamin D Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium and use it to strengthen your bones. When your skin is exposed to sunlight, your liver and kidneys are responsible for making vitamin D. how can you prevent osteoporosis 5.Protein Is Important for Bone Health, Too Protein is in every cell in your body, including your bones. Studies have shown that eating protein increases bone mineral density. 6. what to do for osteoporosis -Don’t drink too much alcohol. Having more than two drinks per day is linked to higher chances of bone loss. 7. quitting smoking - cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis A bone density test measures a small part of one or a few bones to see how strong they are and can tell how likely you are to have osteoporosis. This is how to cure osteoporosis. Talk to your doctor about when you should have a bone density test and whether you may need additional treatment for osteoporosis.
Views: 3279 Weird KickAss Moments
Preventing, Diagnosing and Treating Osteoporosis Video – Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
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Meryl LeBoff, MD, Director of Skeletal Health, Osteoporosis Center, and Bone Density Unit at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), discusses osteoporosis risks, steps for preventing fractures, improving bone health, and treatment options. Osteoporosis is a disease that weakens the bones and increases the risk of fractures. There are several mechanisms that contribute to the development of osteoporosis, including an imbalance in the amount of bone that’s broken down, compared to that which is built up. These factors contribute to the fragility of the bone and of fractures. There are two million fractures each year in the United States. And there are, overall, 54 million Americans that have an increased risk of fracture or have osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is an extremely common disease. One out of two women and one out of four men, 50 years and older, will develop an osteoporotic fracture in their lifetime. Skeletal Health and Osteoporosis Center in the Endocrinology Diabetes and Hypertension Division at BWH, provides a comprehensive program to evaluate the presence of osteoporosis or low bone mass and osteoporosis treatments. Endocrinologists and clinicians are trained in identifying patients who have secondary causes of osteoporosis, and who benefit from treatment to prevent further fractures or the occurrence of a fracture. Learn more about osteoporosis treatment: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/osteoporosis Read the Preventing, Diagnosing and Treating Osteoporosis video transcript: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/medicine/services/rheumatology/Services/Osteoarthritis/osteoporosis-prevention-and-treatment-video-transcript.aspx
Mayo Clinic Minute: Osteoporosis affects men, too
 
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Worldwide, 1 in 3 women over age 50 will experience a bone fracture due to osteoporosis, according to the International Osteoporosis Foundation. But it's not just women, as 1 in 5 men over age 50 also will have the same issue. More health and medical news on the Mayo Clinic News Network. https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/ Journalists: Clean and nat sound versions of this pkg available for download at https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/ Register (free) at https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/request-account/
Views: 686 Mayo Clinic
Treatment Of Osteoporosis In Men by NoMoreVitamins com
 
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http://NoMoreVitamins.com - Don't let yourself take pain pills for the rest of your life, please! There's another way no one has told you about, the holistic way, without more pills and without side-effects! Are you ready to feel less joint pain, less muscle pain and less organ pain, too? Results start after one day! http://NoMoreVitamins.com
Views: 2 Dayne Stayne
Men testing less for Osteoporosis
 
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A new Harvard study finds men are far less likely to be tested for it, and if you are not tested, you may not catch it in time to slow or reverse it’s possibly catastrophic consequences.
Views: 56 kxan
Osteoporosis - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes bone loss and osteoporosis, the etiology, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options. Osteoporosis is a decrease in bone strength. The strength of the bone depends on mineral density and bone quality. Osteoporotic bone is at risk of fracture at the hip, wrist and spine. If fracture of the vertebral spine occurs, the patient will have a five fold increased risk for having a second vertebral fracture or hip fracture. A second vertebral fracture means you may have more compression fractures in the future. With one hip fracture, there will be a ten fold increase of another hip fracture occurring. Men with hip fractures have a higher mortality rate than women. Lifetime risk of fractures of the hip, spine and wrist is 40 %. The decrease of bone strength and bone mass clearly predicts fracture risk. When osteoporosis occurs, cancellous bone or trabecular bone loss occurs. Difference between osteoporosis and osteomalacia. Osteoporosis is the loss of bone mass. Osteomalacia is the reduced mineralization of the bone. Osteoporosis affects 45% of women aged 50 or older. There is some correlation between osteoporotic fracture and risk of death. This is logical since 25% of patients with hip fracture die within one year. The lifetime risk is high with senile (type III) osteoporosis. There are about million osteoporosis related fractures that occur per year. Men and women both begin to start “spending” or losing bone at a certain point in their lives. Banking or building up of bone during youth has benefits during the later years. Osteoclasts and osteoblasts achieve balance and remodeling of the bone. Osteoclasts are irregular shaped giant cells that break down or reabsorbs the bone. The life span of osteoclasts is probably 24-48 hours (may be weeks). Osteoblasts are cells that are responsible for new bone formation. It takes 100-150 osteoblasts to replace bone that is removed by one osteoclast. It takes 3 months and 100-150 osteoblasts to replace bone removed by one osteoclast in 24-48 hours. Osteoporosis has bone mineralization but abnormal osteoclast formation. There is a quantitative but not a qualitative problem of the bone. Most individuals obtain their peak bone mass between ages of 16 and 25 years. Osteoporosis affects about 45% of women 50 years or older. Osteoporosis has bone mineralization but abnormal osteoclast function. There are two types of osteoporosis: 1.Type I: postmenopausal which occurs 15-20 years after menopause. It has increased risk of vertebral and wrist fractures. It affects the trabecular bone. It is due to estrogen deficiency. Increased risk of vertebral, wrist fractures. 2.Type II: senile which occurs in men and women over the age of 70 years. It affects cortical and trabecular bone. Vertebral and hip fractures are a risk. It occurs more in females than males with a ratio 2:1. It is due to aging and long term calcium deficiency. With aging the inner bone diameter increases while the cortical thickness of the bone decreases. 20-25% of elderly patients could die within one year suffering of a hip fracture. Risk factors for osteoporosis include: •Thin •North European descent •people who live sedentary lifestyles •smoker and drinkers •anti seizure medications as phenytoin ( Dilantin) and phenobarbital. Treatment of osteoporosis include: 1-antiresorption: 2-Bone stimulation: What decides if you develop osteoporosis or not? •Your savings: you can control this by adding more bone when you are young before the age of 25 years. •Genetics: •Social/environmental influences: drugs,drinking,cigarettes (negative), exercise, diet, vitamins (positive) •Menopause: accelerated bone loss. •Aging Female athlete triad: 1-menstrual dysfunction/amenorrhea 2-eating disorders 3-decreased bone mineral density. It is a syndrome in which eating disorder, amenorrhea, and decreased bone density (osteoporosis) affect certain groups of athletes. For a long distance runner with stress fractures, obtain a menstrual history and get a DEXA scan. Amenorrhea leads to osteoporosis and predisposes the athlete to fracture. Osteoporosis in spinal cord injury patients •The peak bone loss occurs 16 months after injury •2/3 of the bone mass remains •The knee is usually affected (supracondylar fracture of the femur can occur) Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC Donate to the University of Toledo Foundation Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Endowed Chair Fund: https://www.utfoundation.org/foundation/home/Give_Online.aspx?sig=29 Background music provided as a free download from YouTube Audio Library. Song Title: Every Step
Views: 60106 nabil ebraheim
Bone Health (Osteoporosis) in Men - Part 1
 
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Bone Health (Osteoporosis) in Men with Dr. Eric Orwoll - Part 1. Live video from our Public Forum on Men's Health which took place Nov. 18, 2009 at Vancouver General Hospital.
Views: 500 aboutmenshealth
Top 3 Exercises for Osteoporosis or Osteopenia (Bone Loss)
 
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Famous Physical Therapist's Bob Schrupp and Brad Heineck present three of their favorite exercises for people with osteoporosis or osteopenia. Make sure to like us on FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/Physical-Therapy-317002538489676/timeline/ Check out the Products Bob and Brad LOVE on their Amazon Channel: https://www.amazon.com/shop/physicaltherapyvideo Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/PtFamous Their book “Three Simple Steps To Treat Back Pain” is available on Kindle http://www.amazon.com/Three-Simple-Steps-Treat-Back-ebook/dp/B00BPU4O5G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1444092626&sr=8-1&keywords=3+simple+steps+to+treat+back+pain
Views: 291540 Physical Therapy Video
Osteoporosis: A Man's Disease Too
 
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Think only women are at risk of osteoporosis? Think again. At least one in five men will break a bone from osteoporosis, and one quarter of the 30,000 hip fractures caused by osteoporosis are in men. Watch this video to learn more. Share it with someone you care about and encourage them to get assessed for osteoporosis. Because osteoporosis is a man’s disease, too.
Views: 3393 Osteoporosis Canada
10 Best Exercises for Osteoporosis "Weak or Thinning Bones".
 
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"Famous" Physical Therapists Bob Schrupp and Brad Heineck presnet the 10 Best Exercises for Osteoporosis or "Weak Bones". Make sure to like us on FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/Physical-Therapy-317002538489676/timeline/ Check out the Products Bob and Brad LOVE on their Amazon Channel: https://www.amazon.com/shop/physicaltherapyvideo Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/PtFamous Our Website: https://www.bobandbrad.com/
Views: 78763 Physical Therapy Video
Giving Osteoporosis a Workout
 
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It’s a harsh reality: as we age we lose bone density. More than 50-million Americans are affected by osteoporosis. Loss of bone mass starts around age 30, with many women seeing a dramatic drop coinciding with the change of life; but this condition impacts both sexes. “It does, there are two main types of osteoporosis. The first type occurs in postmenopausal women. The secondary type is also called senile or affects mainly older people over 70 years old and it affects men and women,” says Dr. Fletcher Reynolds, who is an orthopedic surgeon with Lee Memorial Health System. Some experts call osteoporosis a ‘silent thief,’ slowly sapping bone strength. In the process, brittle bones make us more likely to suffer breaks and fractures. While supplementing is a common option, many people would be well-served by getting proactive. “The other thing that can be done are weight-bearing exercises such as walking. Diet can be helpful as far as eating yogurt and milk and things that have high calcium content,” says Dr. Reynolds. Recent research took it a step further, looking at hopping or jumping for two minutes a day. The study included men over the age of 65 and found the higher impact movement improved bone density in the hips and legs at a level comparable to gains made by women who took osteoporosis drugs. Reaffirming the connection between activity and bone building. “As our population ages and people are living longer and longer. Osteoporosis is becoming more of a problem as far as fractures go. We see people on a daily basis that have simple falls people would otherwise get up from,” says Dr. Reynolds. So giving your bones a workout is more than a leap of faith, it may be the building blocks of a strong future. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org
Views: 1481 Lee Health
8 Signs and Symptoms of Osteoporosis in Men
 
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See Our Another Vedeos: 1. Signs and Symptoms of Fibromyalgia,....: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNrjXC3jMfI Subcribe my chanel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYWEoxZsBePnM-qQ3b5Ew9g?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 92 Health Zone +
Do Calcium and Vitamin D Prevent Osteoporosis in Men on Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer?
 
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Men on hormone suppression are routinely advised to take Calcium and vitamin D supplements to prevent osteoporosis and fractures. This video reviews the studies on this topic and whether the treatments are really effective.
Views: 853 Gerald Chodak MD
Osteoporosis Causes, Symptoms, Signs, Treatment - by Dr. Vimee Bindra Basu
 
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Osteoporosis is a disease where increased bone weakness increases the risk of a broken bone. Women tend to have smaller, thinner bones than men. Estrogen, a hormone in women that protects bones, decreases sharply when women reach menopause, which can cause bone loss. A diet low in calcium and other bone-boosting nutrients can also contribute to low bone density. This is why the chance of developing osteoporosis increases as women reach menopause. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium and build it into the bones. Most adults don’t have enough vitamin D in their bodies. Older men and women probably should take vitamin D supplements. Apart from this, exercises aimed at increasing muscle strength, combined with weight-bearing aerobic physical activity, help to prevent bone loss as we age. Watch the live session by Dr. Vimee Bindra Basu, top Gynaecologist and Obstetrician in Hyderabad, on osteoporosis and the treatment and prevention to help them lead a long and healthy life. If you have any concerns regarding anemia, reach out to Dr. Vimee Bindra Basu at Ask Apollo: • To Book an appointment - https://goo.gl/148wde • To Consult Doctor Online - https://goo.gl/Mahwo9 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheApolloHospitals Twitter: https://twitter.com/HospitalsApollo LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/apollo-hospitals Blog: https://www.apollohospitals.com/lets-talk-health/
Views: 8039 Apollo Hospitals
Osteoporosis Treatment In Men by NoMoreVitamins com
 
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http://NoMoreVitamins.com - Don't let yourself take pain pills for the rest of your life, please! There's another way no one has told you about, the natural and holistic way to help reverse your osteoporosis and arthritis without more pills and without side-effects! Are you ready to feel less joint pain, less muscle pain and less organ pain, too? http://NoMoreVitamins.com
Views: 0 HealthFood Guru
Treatment For Osteoporosis In Men by NoMoreVitamins com
 
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http://NoMoreVitamins.com - Don't let yourself take pain pills for the rest of your life, please! There's another way no one has told you about, the holistic way, without more pills and without side-effects! Are you ready to feel less joint pain, less muscle pain and less organ pain, too? Results start after one day! http://NoMoreVitamins.com
Views: 9 Dayne Stayne
How to increase bone density
 
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Low bone density can cause problems as we get older. It’s not just a problem for older people, though. Even young athletes can have osteopenia, or yes, osteoporosis with overtraining, poor nutrient or caloric intake or hormonal imbalance. In this video, I suggest some ideas to increase bone density. http://challenge.drdavidgeier.com/ds/906ca4c8 I want to help you! Please click the link above and take a few seconds to share the biggest challenge or struggle you’re facing with your injury! https://drdavidgeier.com/tips-to-increase-bone-density Click the link above for more information about bone density and other resources to stay healthy and perform your best. Get That Doesn't Have To Hurt FREE! This eBook offers tips that you can take to avoid injuries and perform your best! Plus, learn tips to keep your children safe in sports. http://www.sportsmedicinesimplified.com/that-doesnt-have-to-hurt-ebook Please note: I don't respond to questions and requests for specific medical advice left in the comments to my videos. I receive too many to keep up (several hundred per week), and legally I can't offer specific medical advice to people who aren't my patients (see below). If you want to ask a question about a specific injury you have, leave it in the comments below, and I might answer it in an upcoming Ask Dr. Geier video. If you need more detailed information on your injury, go to my Resources page: https://www.drdavidgeier.com/resources/ The content of this YouTube Channel, https://www.youtube.com/user/drdavidgeier (“Channel”) is for INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. The Channel may offer health, fitness, nutritional and other such information, but such information is intended for educational and informational purposes only. This content should not be used to self-diagnose or self-treat any health, medical, or physical condition. The content does not and is not intended to convey medical advice and does not constitute the practice of medicine. YOU SHOULD NOT RELY ON THIS INFORMATION AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR, NOR DOES IT REPLACE, PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE, DIAGNOSIS, OR TREATMENT. You should consult with your healthcare professional before doing anything contained on this Channel. You agree that Dr. Geier is not responsible for any actions or inaction on your part based on the information that is presented on the Channel. Dr. David Geier Enterprises, LLC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of the content. USE OF THE CONTENT IS AT YOUR OWN RISK. WEIGHT-BEARING EXERCISE Exercise is a key step to keep your bones healthy. Try to get regular weight-bearing exercise. Try walking, running, walking, jumping rope or other exercise on your feet. CALCIUM Calcium plays a key role in bone density. Make sure you get adequate calcium. Many foods are good sources of calcium, including milk, cheese, yogurt, spinach, and other green vegetables. VITAMIN D Vitamin D also plays an important role in bone health. A large percentage of the population had insufficient levels of vitamin D. A healthy, balanced diet, vitamin D supplements and sun exposure can help you get enough vitamin D. Also, consider cutting back on alcohol. A little bit is probably ok for bone density, but avoid drinking too much. CAFFEINE Generally, coffee is felt to be safe in moderation. Too much of it, though, can interfere with the body’s ability to absorb calcium. Try to drink less coffee. Talk to your doctor if you have concerns about low bone density. Even consider getting tested for osteoporosis.
Views: 2634 Dr. David Geier
Preventing Fractures for Men on Hormone Therapy
 
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One risk of lowering testosterone is the possibility of developing fractures due to osteoporosis. Doctors are supposed to recommend vitamin D and Calcium but the question is how much should be taken. This video discusses the latest information and also a new treatment called Prolia.
Views: 854 Gerald Chodak MD
Osteoporosis in Men
 
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Dr. Larry Dian is a Clinical Professor in Geriatric Medicine at the University of British Columbia.
Views: 138 aboutmenshealth
Men and Osteoporosis
 
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While it is true that osteoporosis is more common in women, 20 percent of those in the U.S. with osteoporosis are men. This video will help men understand what osteoporosis is, what the signs and symptoms are, how they can help prevent the disease, and what can be done to treat it once it does occur.
Views: 200 americanbonehealth
5 Signs of Osteoporosis
 
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Hey Everyone, Aqila here.. In this video I will talk about "5 Signs of Osteoporosis" Knowing the early 5 Common Signs of Osteoporosis can help you receive the best treatment before it becomes serious or even life threatening. Osteoporosis is more common in women than men. Eighty percent, or four out of five, of the 10 million people who have it are women. As you age, it’s possible for old bone to break down faster than the building of new bone. This causes your bones to have holes and become more fragile. And here are 5 common signs of osteoporosis that you should to know; 1. Having a fragility fracture. 2. Loss of Height. 3. Sudden back pain. 4. Persistent back pain. 5.Thyroid Troubles. Are you worried that you or someone you know, may have Osteoporosis? Having some of the signs of Osteoporosis doesn’t mean you definitely have the condition, but you should always contact your doctor, just to make sure. So you can seek immediate treatment. Thank you for watching "5 Common Signs of Osteoporosis." Early Detection Could Save Your Life Longer. SUBSCRIBE for more videos. Hope you feel better.
Factors That Increase The Risk Of Osteoporosis In Men
 
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Subscribe to Good Life : https://goo.gl/ArFnf1 Factors That Increase The Risk Of Osteoporosis In Men Osteoporosis is considered as a women's disease by most men; but men are more prone to break a bone due to osteoporosis than to get prostate cancer. Men are more prone because of their lifestyle and habits and only a few can recognize the problem before breaking a bone. Osteoporosis is a silent disease that is tough to detect. As men have a larger skeleton, bone loss starts much later and happens at a much slower rate, as men don't have fast hormonal change. Rate of loss in men in their 50's is much lower as compared to women of the same age because they go through menopause. At the age of 65-70 years both have the same rate of bone loss. There Are 2 Main Types Of Osteoporosis: 1. Primary Osteoporosis: For men over 70, the condition is called Senile Osteoporosis and is caused by an age-related issue and bone loss is the major reason. For men below the age of 70, the term used is Idiopathic Osteoporosis. 2. Secondary Osteoporosis: The loss of bone mass is caused because of a certain lifestyle behaviour. The most common reason is exposure to excess alcohol consumption, smoking, lack of exercise and gastrointestinal disease. Main Reasons For Rise Of Osteoporosis In Men 1. Age Age is the biggest factor in men for having the disease. After the age of 50, men lose their bone density at the rate of about 0.5 to 1 percent yearly...
Views: 107 Good Life
HMN Osteoporosis in Men
 
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Views: 149 Ben Garrett
Osteoporosis: Risks for men and women
 
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"Early Show" medical correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton talks to Erica Hill and Chris Wragge about the risk factors for osteoporosis and what you can do to minimize them.
Views: 2422 CBS
Men and Osteoporosis
 
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#WINNING Men and Osteoporosis PSA
Views: 45 Allie Shepard
Osteoporosis in Men
 
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Views: 69 jimmcdonald789
Male Osteoporosis - Are men at risk?
 
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Osteoporosis is a medical condition which causes the bones to thin and become weak and brittle. The condition is commonly associated with older women but men are at risk too. In fact, over two million men already have osteoporosis. Due to a lack of knowledge about the condition (in men) and lack of symptoms, men are not taking the proper steps to help prevent or slow the progression of osteoporosis. For more information on osteoporosis: http://www.ibji.com/services/arthritis-osteoarthritis/osteoporosis
Does osteoporosis affect men?
 
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Osteoporosis does affect men, even though women are more likely to develop the disease. Premier HealthNet's Dr. Dori Thompson explains more about how osteoporosis affects men. Find more answers to frequently asked questions about osteoporosis at http://www.premierhealthnet.com/familyhealth.
Views: 32366 Premier Health
New Drug Being Tested to Treat Osteoporosis - VOA Story
 
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There are a lot of myths about osteoporosis, a bone disease that leads to the thinning of bone tissue, and ultimately, to broken hips, wrists and spines. One myth is that only women get osteoporosis. Another: that only old women get it. The truth is, men can suffer from it too. So can young people. But osteoporosis is treatable, and now, there is a new, once-a-year treatment on the horizon. a new drug, zoledronic acid, only needs to be taken once a year through an IV drip that takes 15 minutes. A study found women who got zoledronic acid had dramatically fewer spine and hip fractures than those taking a placebo. The women on zoledronic acid also had significantly fewer fractures of other bones.
Views: 1629 MyEarbot
How Osteoporosis in Women is Detected, Diagnosed and Treated
 
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Ladies, I would like to have a moment of your time to address the following – your bones. Osteoporosis in women is an epidemic. As women, it’s crucial that we educate ourselves on the disease as our chances of getting osteoporosis is double compared to men. In this article, we will be discussing causes, symptoms, treatments, early signs to watch out for and more. By educating ourselves as early as possible about osteoporosis we stand a good chance of preventing it and even reversing it! Remember, no matter how old you are, man or woman, it’s never too late to start taking care of your bones! To read in its entirety, go here: https://www.algaecal.com/expert-insights/osteoporosis-in-women-detected-diagnosed-treated/
Views: 445 AlgaeCal
IF Online Men's Health  - The Truth About Osteoporosis in Men
 
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Osteoporosis affects tens of millions of people in the US, and - contrary to what you might have heard - is a very real danger to men as well as women. It's a disease that makes bones prone to fracture, and is behind one in three hip fractures in men. That makes this video from Dr. Art Hister essential viewing for anyone who wants to stay active as they age. This video will help you: Learn about osteoporosis in men Gain knowledge for healthier living Understand your body
Views: 198 InnoFitOnline
Osteoporosis in Men
 
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An informative spoof of most medical commercials.
Views: 55 welovemswiley
Osteoporosis - What It Is And How To Prevent Bone Loss
 
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Osteoporosis is a medical condition in which the bones become brittle and fragile from loss of tissue, typically as a result of hormonal changes, or deficiency of calcium or vitamin D. Who gets Osteoporosis? Unfortunately the odds are stacked against women when it comes to bone health and the news isn’t much better for men. So what can you do for healthier bones? Testing: • DXA Scan • N-telopeptide Treatments: • Vitamin D with K2 • Ca+ with Ipriflavone • Strontium • Testosterone • DHEA • Growth Hormone Lifestyle changes: • Reduce Alcohol • Stop smoking • Weight bearing exercise Besides the most common symptoms due to hormone imbalances such as low libido, fatigue and weight gain, we see many men and women with accelerated bone loss due to osteoporosis. To learn more about Age Related Diseases, Advanced Hormone Therapy and find out where your values are, start by contacting our office at 937-350-5527 to schedule your blood test and consultation with Dr. Rob. You can learn more about Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy on our website at http://www.renuehealth.com
Views: 426 Renue Health
The Diagnosis and Treatment of Osteoporosis at the Center for Bone Health
 
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According to the International Osteoporosis Foundation, osteoporosis causes more than 8.9 million worldwide fractures annually. That is an osteoporotic fracture every 3 seconds. In most cases, this bone disease goes unnoticed until a fracture occurs. The Center for Bone Health was developed to screen this “silent disease” and provide treatment options when necessary. The Center’s highly-skilled team are passionate about helping patients with treating and managing their osteoporosis to reduce the risk of bone fractures. Vicki DeNoia, MSN, RN, APN has fifteen years of experience in bone fragility assessment, evaluating risk for fracture, treatment and management of osteoporosis. The Center for Bone Health provides the best care for your bones and empowers you to take control of your bone health. For additional information, please visit www.MeridianMedicalGroupNJ.com/BoneHealth. Osteoporosis, the most common bone disease, causes bones to lose density and strength, which increases a persons' risk of fracture. In the U.S., more than 54 million people have low bone mass and osteoporosis, but only 10 million have been diagnosed or evaluated. Hackensack Meridian Health opened the Center for Bone Health in January 2017. Vicki helps patients manage their health by making sure that they continue to have healthy bones as they age. Vicki and her team provide patients with DXA screenings. The DXA screening is the gold standard for osteoporosis screening as it is a 'full person evaluation.' Vicki advises her patients to take calcium every day, preferably from natural sources in their diet. If her patients are not getting enough calcium through their diet, they may need to take a calcium supplement. She advises patients to take a look at the back of food labels to see how much calcium they are getting. Men require 1,000 mg a day, and women need 1,200-1,600 mg. Vicki suggests that her patients have their vitamin D tested regularly. She also advises her patients to have their height checked as many people are unaware that they are losing height until they notice their pants getting longer. Tobacco increases one's risk of osteoporosis. If you are smoking, you need to stop. Subscribe for new videos - http://bit.ly/SubscribeHMH Learn more about Hackensack Meridian Health - http://bit.ly/HMHWeb Hackensack Meridian Health is a leading not-for-profit health care organization that is truly the most integrated health care network in New Jersey. Get Connected. ➸ Facebook - http://bit.ly/HMHFacebook ➸ Twitter - http://bit.ly/HMHTwitter ➸ Instagram - http://bit.ly/HMHInstagram ➸ Flickr - http://bit.ly/HMHFlickr ➸ LinkedIn - http://bit.ly/HMHLinkedIn ➸ SoundCloud - http://bit.ly/HMHSoundCloud Thanks for watching and subscribing!
Men also at risk for osteoporosis, study finds
 
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Osteoporosis is often known to be a disease that affects women, but new studies show that one in four men over the age of 50 will break a bone because of the disease. Medical contributor Dr. David Agus joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss the findings.
Views: 174 CBS This Morning