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What's the Difference Between Realism & Naturalism? | ARTiculations
 
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Betty explains the difference between the art movement realism and the art style naturalism. #withcaptions If you'd like to help support ARTiculations - feel free to leave something in the tip jar: https://ko-fi.com/articulations Please subscribe to ARTiculations to stay up to date on future episodes! http://www.articulations.co You can also follow me on: Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/articulationsv Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/articulationsv Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/articulationsv Sources & Additional Reading: http://www.artmovements.co.uk/realism.htm http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/rlsm/hd_rlsm.htm http://www.arthistoryrules.com/Visual_Elements/Naturalism.html http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/history-of-art/naturalism.htm Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/HaMS/
Views: 43199 ARTiculations
Chris Atkins: "Naturalism and Meaning in Dutch Art"
 
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Lecture by Chris Atkins for exhibition: REFORMING THE IMAGE NORTHERN EUROPE IN THE DUTCH GOLDEN AGE February 4 – April 27, 2013 This exhibition, curated by eleven Dutch art history seminar students and professor Christopher Atkins, includes paintings, prints, sculpture and historical artifacts from the 16th-18th century Netherlands, Germany, England, France and colonial Queens. It shows how art pictured new attitudes about man and the natural world and reflected a rise in democracy and the middle classes. In sites impacted by the Protestant Reformation, religious, social, and scientific revolutions engendered a flowering of secular subject matter and naturalistic aesthetics that gave birth to modern art genres. The exhibition examines how artworks provide a glimpse of history and evidence of the values and structure of societies, focusing on Dutch art and culture, well represented in the GTM. Themes addressed include: the emergence of capitalism, the market, the individual and the development of taste, looking at newly embraced subjects such as landscape, portraiture, still life, and genre scenes, in contrast to religious and dynastic subjects of the pre-modern era. Curators: Anthony Biondolillo, Jenna Caputo, Lu Meng Chu, Lisa Finger, Hana Isoda, Thea Lanzisero, Nakyoung Lee, Kyrstin McCabe, Stacey Scheider, Heather Simon, Kaitlyn Tucek
Popular Salon Paintings by Naturalist Émile Friant
 
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Émile Friant (1863 – 1932) was a French artist, born in the eastern part of France, but forced to flee to Nancy at an early age by the advance of Prussian soldiers. Although he was born to parents of modest means, he was lucky to have “second parents” who helped fund his training. Due to his skill, he was able to present in a Paris salon at the young age of 15 and gain considerable notoriety, becoming rather popular around the Salon scene in Paris during his life. He was known for his rejection of academic painting in favor of us his style of naturalism. From The Eclectic Light Company: He’s been called the Last Naturalist, and like many of the Naturalists whom I have featured here, was both popular in his day and almost forgotten now. Émile Friant (1863–1932) rebelled against the academic style of the 1880s, and is one of the major artists discussed by Richard Thomson in his account of French painting between 1880-1900 From Rehs Art Gallery: In the late nineteenth century Nancy emerged from beneath the shadow of Paris to establish itself as the second artistic center of France. One of the Nancéienneartists was Émile Friant, who began his artistic career at an extremely young age and rose to prominence with his version of naturalism which later manifested into a latent symbolism. It was noted that Friant “appears to have the sincerity at least as much as the ability to be a major artist, and we have confidence that he will remain faithful to art in a time when wealthy manufacturers have invaded the temple, giving young people the fatal example of rapid fortunes and superficial studies…” .. Friant’s public acceptance would reach impressive levels, but despite consistent acclaim, he sought new methods of representation and various uses of media while promoting his work outside the Salon system. […] The life and work of Emile Friant presents an artist who was equally influenced by Paris as well as by his home city of Nancy. But he remained attached to a more academic style of naturalism which appealed to a public both in France and abroad as he demonstrated that the training he received in Nancy could be used to maintain a substantial career. Composer: Whitesand (Martynas Lau) Year: 2017 Title: Neverland 〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰 🦉 Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AncientEurope 🌌 Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/facesofancienteurope/albums 〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰〰
Paul Gauguin: A collection of 283 paintings (HD)
 
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Paul Gauguin: A collection of 283 paintings (HD) Description: "Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin, the most exotic of the Post-Impressionists, was born in Paris, France. The son of a French journalist and a Peruvian woman, Gauguin spent his early childhood in Peru, attended a boarding school in France, and was a merchant seaman before becoming a stockbroker's assistant in 1871. An occasional painter at first, Gauguin frequented the Nouvelle Athenes Café where he met Pissarro and the Impressionists, whose works he purchased. Gauguin had married in 1873, and it was not until 10 years later that he decided to give up the business world and devote himself to art. After a period in Rouen where he stayed with Pissarro, Gauguin went to Copenhagen with his Danish wife, only to leave his family forever a few months later. Gauguin was past age 35 and almost penniless, though a loan from Degas, who approved of his theories on the importance of line, permitted him to go to Pont-Aven. At Pont-Aven Gauguin and Emile Bernard would develop Synthetism, a style in which the expression of ideas and emotions are more important than naturalistic representations, and flat color areas reminiscent of Japanese woodcuts are outlined by heavy black lines in the manner of cloisonné enamels or stained-glass windows. Gauguin, abandoning his earlier Impressionism, painted in this manner and also made ceramics and wood carvings to earn money. These were decorative, finely conceived Art Nouveau pieces, with a symbolism learned from Puvis de Chavannes, whom he had also admired. In 1887, Gauguin made an unsuccessful trip to Martinique to search for a primitive way of life. He spent 1888, the year of his great Synthetist work "The Yellow Christ", in Arles with Vincent van Gogh. This adventure ended in near tragedy, as Vincent van Gogh exhibited signs of madness. Gauguin returned shortly to Brittany before leaving for Tahiti on his constant quest for the simple life and the peace of mind he would never really find. Gauguin's style, developed in the South, is a fusion of Oriental influences, personal symbolism, strong design, warm color, and musically rich expression that offers a spiritual image of the creative artist constantly seeking the unattainable. Gauguin remained in Tahiti until 1893, when poor health and lack of funds forced his return to Paris. He remained there until 1895, when he again settled in Tahiti. Gauguin's stay there ended in 1901 when he became seriously ill with syphilis and in trouble with the French authorities. He moved to the Marquesas, seeking an easier and cheaper life. His health, unfortunately, deteriorated further, but he continued to paint until he died on May 8, 1903." Feel free to subscribe!
Views: 37230 LearnFromMasters
Jacopo Pontormo & Orazio Gentileschi: A collection of 106 Paintings (HD) [Mannerism]
 
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Jacopo Pontormo & Orazio Gentileschi: A collection of 106 Paintings (HD) [Mannerism] (Late Renaissance) [RENAISSANCE ART] Jacopo Pontormo #JacopoPontormo Jacopo Carucci - Born: 24 May 1494; Pontorme, near Empoli, Italy - Died: 02 January 1557; Florence, Italy - Nationality: Italian - Art Movement: Mannerism (Late Renaissance) - Painting School: Florentine School - Field: painting Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontormo -------------- Jacopo Carucci (May 24, 1494 – January 2, 1557), usually known as Jacopo da Pontormo, Jacopo Pontormo or simply Pontormo, was an Italian Mannerist painter and portraitist from the Florentine School. His work represents a profound stylistic shift from the calm perspectival regularity that characterized the art of the Florentine Renaissance. He is famous for his use of twining poses, coupled with ambiguous perspective; his figures often seem to float in an uncertain environment, unhampered by the forces of gravity. Jacopo had not been many months in Florence before Bernardo Vettori sent him to stay with Leonardo da Vinci, and then with Mariotto Albertinelli, Piero di Cosimo, and finally, in 1512, with Andrea del Sarto, with whom he did not remain long, for after he had done the cartoons for the arch of the Servites, it does not seem that Andrea bore him any good will, whatever the cause may have been. Pontormo shares some of the mannerism of Rosso Fiorentino and of Parmigianino. In some ways he anticipated the Baroque as well as the tensions of El Greco. His eccentricities also resulted in an original sense of composition. At best, his compositions are cohesive. --------------- Orazio Gentileschi #OrazioGentileschi Orazio Lomi Gentileschi - Born: 09 July 1563; Tuscany, Italy - Died: 07 February 1639; London, United Kingdom - Nationality: Italian - Art Movement: Mannerism (Late Renaissance) - Painting School: Caravaggisti - Field: painting - Pupils: Artemisia Gentileschi - Friends and Co-workers: Agostino Tassi, Anthony van Dyck - Family and Relatives: Artemisia Gentileschi Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orazio_Gentiles -------------- Orazio Lomi Gentileschi (1563–1639) was an Italian painter. Born in Tuscany, he began his career in Rome, painting in a Mannerist style, much of his work consisting of painting the figures within the decorative schemes of other artists. After 1600, he came under the influence of the more naturalistic style of Caravaggio. He received important commissions in Fabriano and Genoa before moving to Paris to the court of Marie de Medici. He spent the last part of his life at the court of Charles I of England. He was the father of the painter Artemisia Gentileschi. From around 1600, Gentileschi's style was transformed by his contact with Caravaggio – several years his junior – who was then in Rome. In late August 1603, Giovanni Baglione filed a suit for libel against Caravaggio, Gentileschi, Ottavio Leoni, and Filipo Trisegni in connection with some unflattering poems circulated amongst the artistic community of Rome over the preceding summer. Caravaggio's testimony during the trial as recorded in court documents is one of the few insights into his thoughts about the subject of art and his contemporaries.[3] After Caravaggio's flight from Rome, Gentileschi developed a more personal Tuscan lyricism, characterized by lighter colours and precision in detail, reminiscent of his Mannerist beginnings. ------------------- Check out my Work at --------------------------------------------------- #Mannerism (Late Renaissance) [RENAISSANCE ART] : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOZVqusZxS_R-6z6EiRJoHlqBNULhPdZQ #BAROQUE [Post Renaissance Art] : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOZVqusZxS_TFGVWRL6nG5V3C9j3h5xnp #HIGH_RENAISSANCE [Renaissance Art]: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOZVqusZxS_TAW8yBAWDSpPeV-B4EUnUe #EARLY_RENAISSANCE [RENAISSANCE ARTS] : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOZVqusZxS_Rl5u1xeWi3_hNWVbd99rp8 #PROTO_RENAISSANCE [Renaissance Art] : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOZVqusZxS_R6P61q7DOnuZgGGsqw-tN3 #Medieval_Art : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOZVqusZxS_T7YNe7cv7fLpg6Hej3NiSh THE HIGHLIGHT: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOZVqusZxS_RMuvIyAIEplral4SxUwJt8 Updating ... _____ SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIuWeUnkfqn_yKlo_RAaoDA Google+: https://plus.google.com/116866857388773060412 Twitter: https://twitter.com/_NineTv Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/9Tv-230691850953077/ Contact: [email protected] Thank you for your support! :| 9Tv |: No Arts No Life © Copyright by 9Tv
Views: 93 9 Tv
Francisco de Zurbaran: A collection of 106 paintings (HD)
 
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Francisco de Zurbarán: A collection of 106 paintings (HD) Description: "Francisco de Zurbarán, (baptized November 7, 1598, Fuente de Cantos, Spain—died August 27, 1664, Madrid), major painter of the Spanish Baroque who is especially noted for religious subjects. His work is characterized by Caravaggesque naturalism and tenebrism, the latter a style in which most forms are depicted in shadow but a few are dramatically lighted. Zurbarán was apprenticed 1614–16 to Pedro Díaz de Villanueva in Sevilla (Seville), where he spent the greater part of his life. No works by his master have survived, but Zurbarán’s earliest known painting, an Immaculate Conception (1616), suggests that he was schooled in the same naturalistic style as his contemporary Diego Velázquez. From 1617 to 1628 he was living in Llerena, near his birthplace; then he returned to Sevilla, where he settled at the invitation of the city corporation. In 1634 he visited Madrid and was commissioned by Philip IV to paint a series of Labours of Hercules and two scenes of the Defense of Cádiz, which formed part of the decoration of the Hall of Realms in the Buen Retiro palace. The Adoration of the Kings, from a series painted for the Carthusian monastery at Jerez, is signed with the title “Painter to the King” and dated 1638, the year in which Zurbarán decorated a ceremonial ship presented to the king by the city of Sevilla. The paintings for the Buen Retiro are the only royal commissions and the only mythological or historical subjects by Zurbarán that are known. His contact with the court had little effect on his artistic evolution; he remained throughout his life a provincial artist and was par excellence a painter of religious life. In 1658 Zurbarán moved to Madrid. Zurbarán’s personal style was already formed in Sevilla by 1629, and its development was probably stimulated by the early works of Velázquez and by the works of José de Ribera. It was a style that lent itself well to portraiture and still life, but it found its most characteristic expression in his religious subjects. Indeed Zurbarán uses naturalism more convincingly than other exponents for the expression of intense religious devotion. His apostles, saints, and monks are painted with almost sculptural modeling and with an emphasis on the minutiae of their dress that gives verisimilitude to their miracles, visions, and ecstasies. This distinctive combination of realism and religious sensibility conforms to the Counter-Reformation guidelines for artists outlined by the Council of Trent (1545–63). Zurbarán’s art was popular with monastic orders in Sevilla and the neighbouring provinces, and he received commissions for many large cycles. Of these, only the legends of St. Jerome and of the Hieronymite monks (1638–39) that decorate the chapel and sacristy of the Hieronymite monastery at Guadalupe have remained in situ. Little is known of his production in the 1640s apart from an altarpiece at Zafra (1643–44) and records of a large number of paintings destined for Lima, Peru (1647). By 1658 both the style and the content of Zurbarán’s paintings had undergone a change that can be attributed to the influence of Bartolomé Esteban Murillo. In his late devotional pictures, such as Holy Family and Immaculate Conception (1659 and 1661, respectively), the figures have become more idealized and less solid in form, and their expression of religious emotion is marred by sentimentality. Zurbarán had several followers whose works have been confused with his." --- SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/c/LearnFromMasters?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnFromMasters/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LearnFromMasters Contact: [email protected] --- Thanks for all support!
Views: 2286 LearnFromMasters
How to create your Drawing Style - Tips
 
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In this video I give you 5 tips and advices to find or create your own art / drawing style. My Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/domingo.pino There are different styles: naturalistic, hyperrealistic, manga / anime, abstract, caricature, realistic... and within each style there are different genres and techniques. In this video I explain 5 ways to create your own style of drawing: Look at the work of other artists, look for references around you (photos, video games, movies ...), analyze what you like about other artists, draw from natural and practice a lot. I hope you enjoy it!
Views: 4840 Art Pro
How To Draw a Flower step by step In 6 Minutes!
 
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How To Draw a Flower step by step In 6 Minutes! After uploading my previous Rose video with real time i was thinking that i should continue this so i made another one but this time it will be only in 6 minutes. Since i have drawn roses a lot, i tried different flower this time. I hope it helps for someone to learn! TOOLS I USE : STAEDTLER PENCILS: AMAZON UK: Pack of 10 : https://amzn.to/2Sf7nnE AMAZON UK: HB Pack of 50: https://amzn.to/2O3LJzc AMAZON UK: 2B PENCIL: https://amzn.to/2O1b39a AMAZON INDIA: STAEDTLER: https://amzn.to/2NZORwd AMAZON INDIA: Pencils 3H-10B https://amzn.to/2RfjD6e AMAZON INDIA: 2B PENCILS: https://amzn.to/2RdHvqG Color pencils: AMAZON UK: Faber Castel: https://amzn.to/2OQA64b AMAZON UKl Prismacolor: https://amzn.to/2yywrxx AMAZON INDIA: Faber: https://amzn.to/2yyTtEx AMAZON INDIA: Prisma: https://amzn.to/2D5zwt3 Brushes: AMAZON UK: https://amzn.to/2D4ytcX AMAZON INDIA: https://amzn.to/2Jf4oaL Mechanical Pencil: Awesome for sketches: https://amzn.to/2OLwxvZ Camera I use: AMAZON UK:https://amzn.to/2OO9vVp AMAZON INDIA: https://amzn.to/2SivLVe Tripod: https://amzn.to/2SfdJDl You can purchase my Art here: https://www.ebay.com/usr/edgarsart My other social links: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/edgarscreative/ FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/edgars.bumeisters.1 Contact: [email protected] Some of the links above are affiliate links. Purchasing anything through these links helps to support this channel with no additional cost to you.
Views: 2000597 EdgarsArt
Thomas Cole: A collection of 134 paintings (HD)
 
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Thomas Cole: A collection of 134 paintings (HD) Description: "Thomas Cole (1801-1848) was primarily a landscape artist, who developed his style of painting from European art masters and by studying at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. His sketches and paintings were of the Catskills, White Mountains, Adirondacks, and the coast of Maine, yet he also produced many allegorical works, painted in a series. Cole was the founder of the Hudson River School, an American art movement, which promoted realistic and detailed portrayals of American landscapes and its wilderness. Painting with a romantic and naturalistic style, Cole became a famous painter of landscapes and an important study of painting style to other artists. " --- SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/c/LearnFromMasters?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnFromMasters/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LearnFromMasters Contact: [email protected] --- Thanks for all support!
Views: 7689 LearnFromMasters
How To Watercolor - Watercolor Lessons with Susan Harrison-Tustain
 
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http://www.susanart.com/1-on-1 One-on-One Watercolor Workshops. Learn Susan's "naturalistic realism" style of watercolor painting in this double disc compilation of Susan Harrison-Tustain's 2 best-selling videos. Watch over 3.5 hours of Susan's best tips and techniques on painting in watercolors. For more information on this exciting DVD set, visit Susan's website at http://www.susanart.com/1-on-1 Susan's email newsletters keep you up to date with her upcoming DVD releases, exhibitions, international workshops and so much more. They often also contain invaluable painting hints, tips and insights. You can subscribe to them by visiting the 'Home' page of her website (http://www.susanart.com).
Views: 136920 Susan Harrison-Tustain
How to Paint A Tree with Watercolor
 
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Watch Watercolor tutorial on every SUNDAY. SUBSCRIBE US, stay updated for our next videos. Watch step by step painting. .......................................................................... SUNDAY- Watercolor Tutorials MONDAY- Acrylic Tutorials WEDNESDAY- Pastel Tutorials FRIDAY- Pen & Pencil Tutorials .......................................................................... ♥ SUBSCRIBE US at: https://goo.gl/aIPTzL for more great Tutorials ♥ Like us on Facebook:- https://www.facebook.com/ThePaintAcademy ♥ Follow us on Twitter:- https://twitter.com/paint_academy ___________________________________________ ► Last Video:- https://youtu.be/-J2DcLmizn4 ► Most Popular Video:- https://youtu.be/PuQ4xkb6Q88 ► Share this Video:- https://youtu.be/x_wu7ZwKouM ___________________________________________ Watch the video for easy step by step guide for painting this beautiful picture.. Hope you will like this Drawing and let me know if you were able to recreate it.. ◙ Product Details:- Pencil:- 2B http://amzn.to/1UcOaQS Color:- 1. Camel Artist's Water Color 12 Shades- http://amzn.to/2id3RtX 2. Camlin Artists' Water Color 18 shades http://amzn.to/1pPynuT [French Ultramarine Blue is not in the box you have to buy it separately You can buy Camlin or Sennelier:- http://amzn.to/1Md3gDn] Acrylic colors:- http://amzn.to/1UjMDZs Paper:- Buff Cartridge Paper Palette:- http://amzn.to/1Md6VkJ Masking Tape- http://amzn.to/2fiOp05 Extra Product you can use:- Handmade Paper:- http://amzn.to/1Md5Mtc Canson A3 Fine Grain Sheets- http://amzn.to/2eI8ris Fabriano Studio Watercolor Blocks- http://amzn.to/2dZHjHB Daler-Rowney A3 Watercolour Pad- http://amzn.to/2f080P9 Dreambolic Watercolor Notebook- http://amzn.to/2dS6T6g spiral water color pad A3 size- http://amzn.to/2f08hBF Khyati Air Tight Colour Mixing Palette- http://amzn.to/2dZEW7W Camel Artist's Watercolor 9ml, 18 Shades- http://amzn.to/2dZFdYg Winsor & Newton 12 Watercolor- http://amzn.to/2f4HcM2 Daler-Rowney Natural Camel Hair Brush- http://amzn.to/2eneZQD ___________________________________________ ► WATCH MORE Watercolor:- 1) How to Draw A Still Life : Fruits:- https://youtu.be/ZNblFqpn1gI 2) How to Draw a House Landscape:- https://youtu.be/_ATPodHc4vw 3) Watercolor Mountain Landscape | Epi-2:- https://youtu.be/T1yY6qECdaU ► Watch Pencil Drawing Tutorials:- https://goo.gl/XxSh8j ► Watch Pastel Tutorials:- https://goo.gl/3cKbJK ► Watch Watercolor Tutorials:- https://goo.gl/5EIod1 Disclaimers: all opinions are Paint Academy, affiliate links are Amazon.
Views: 1104981 Paint Academy
Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) - The Portraits - A collection of paintings 4K Ultra HD
 
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Pablo Ruiz Picasso (1881-1973) was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, stage designer, poet and playwright who spent most of his adult life in France. Regarded as one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture, the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore. Picasso demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a naturalistic manner through his childhood and adolescence. During the first decade of the 20th century, his style changed as he experimented with different theories, techniques, and ideas. After 1906, the Fauvist work of the slightly older artist Henri Matisse motivated Picasso to explore more radical styles, beginning a fruitful rivalry between the two artists, who subsequently were often paired by critics as the leaders of modern art. Picasso was exceptionally prolific throughout his long lifetime. The total number of artworks he produced has been estimated at 50,000, comprising 1,885 paintings; 1,228 sculptures; 2,880 ceramics, roughly 12,000 drawings, many thousands of prints, and numerous tapestries and rugs. The medium in which Picasso made his most important contribution was painting. In his paintings, Picasso used colour as an expressive element, but relied on drawing rather than subtleties of colour to create form and space. He sometimes added sand to his paint to vary its texture. A nanoprobe of Picasso's The Red Armchair (1931) by physicists at Argonne National Laboratory in 2012 confirmed art historians' belief that Picasso used common house paint in many of his paintings. Much of his painting was done at night by artificial light. Picasso's early sculptures were carved from wood or modelled in wax or clay, but from 1909 to 1928 Picasso abandoned modelling and instead made sculptural constructions using diverse materials. An example is Guitar (1912), a relief construction made of sheet metal and wire that Jane Fluegel terms a "three-dimensional planar counterpart of Cubist painting" that marks a "revolutionary departure from the traditional approaches, modeling and carving". Pablo Picasso, 1921, Nous autres musiciens (Three Musicians), oil on canvas, 204.5 x 188.3 cm, Philadelphia Museum of Art From the beginning of his career, Picasso displayed an interest in subject matter of every kind, and demonstrated a great stylistic versatility that enabled him to work in several styles at once. For example, his paintings of 1917 included the pointillist Woman with a Mantilla, the Cubist Figure in an Armchair, and the naturalistic Harlequin (all in the Museu Picasso, Barcelona). In 1919, he made a number of drawings from postcards and photographs that reflect his interest in the stylistic conventions and static character of posed photographs. In 1921 he simultaneously painted several large neoclassical paintings and two versions of the Cubist composition Three Musicians (Museum of Modern Art, New York; Philadelphia Museum of Art). In an interview published in 1923, Picasso said, "The several manners I have used in my art must not be considered as an evolution, or as steps towards an unknown ideal of painting ... If the subjects I have wanted to express have suggested different ways of expression I have never hesitated to adopt them." Although his Cubist works approach abstraction, Picasso never relinquished the objects of the real world as subject matter. Prominent in his Cubist paintings are forms easily recognized as guitars, violins, and bottles. When Picasso depicted complex narrative scenes it was usually in prints, drawings, and small-scale works; Guernica (1937) is one of his few large narrative paintings. Picasso painted mostly from imagination or memory. According to William Rubin, Picasso "could only make great art from subjects that truly involved him ... Unlike Matisse, Picasso had eschewed models virtually all his mature life, preferring to paint individuals whose lives had both impinged on, and had real significance for, his own." The art critic Arthur Danto said Picasso's work constitutes a "vast pictorial autobiography" that provides some basis for the popular conception that "Picasso invented a new style each time he fell in love with a new woman". The autobiographical nature of Picasso's art is reinforced by his habit of dating his works, often to the day. He explained: "I want to leave to posterity a documentation that will be as complete as possible. That's why I put a date on everything I do Pablo Picasso - The Early Years: https://youtu.be/Bz5f8rEwboQ Pablo Picasso - The Nudes: https://youtu.be/z9IM7MaPovg Thank you, please subscribe for future videos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0gMk3w9hw8BbtqoUpEMKeg?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 401 Master Painters
Elmer Sprunger: Artist, Naturalist and Political Humorist
 
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The Hockaday Museum of Art proudly presents the "Elmer Sprunger: Artist, Naturalist and Political Humorist" exhibition May 26 through September 3, 2011. Featuring 44 original paintings and many examples of his editorial cartoons, this exhibit features works from the collections of Donald & Nancy Beardsley, Dennis Brieske, Sonny & Lucy Carlson, Denny & Kitty Kellogg, Mark Sherman, Richard & Beverley Sherman and Jerry Sprunger. Please visit the Museum Tuesday - Saturday, 10am - 5pm to see this historic exhibit of the well-known Kalispell native's work. For more information, please visit www.hockadaymuseum.org.
Views: 732 HockadayMuseum
Naturalism and Artifice, Thinking About Pictorialism
 
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My friend the photo collector Don Camera is a force of nature, and what he told me about the period in the history of photography called Pictorialism one afternoon touched on several points that I have been thinking about ever since. He also lent me a superb book filled with great examples. Is Pictorialism really over, or might it be ready for a comeback?
Views: 2653 John Thornton
The 21 Greatest Painters
 
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These are the 21 greatest painters ever and some of their masterpieces! Subscribe & Share! Find us: http://www.thepowerofmusicart.weebly.com http://www.facebook.com/thepowerofmusicart https://www.youtube.com/c/thepowerofmusicart Music: Wahneta Meixsell - Allemande infos Painting is the practice of applying paint, pigment, color or other medium to a surface (support base). The medium is commonly applied to the base with a brush but other implements, such as knives, sponges, and airbrushes, can be used. In art, the term painting describes both the act and the result of the action. Paintings may have for their support such surfaces as walls, paper, canvas, wood, glass, lacquer, clay, leaf, copper or concrete, and may incorporate multiple other materials including sand, clay, paper, plaster, gold leaf as well as objects. The term painting is also used outside of art as a common trade among craftsmen and builders. Painting is a mode of creative expression, and the forms are numerous. Drawing, gesture (as in gestural painting), composition, narration (as in narrative art), or abstraction (as in abstract art), among other aesthetic modes, may serve to manifest the expressive and conceptual intention of the practitioner. Paintings can be naturalistic and representational (as in a still life or landscape painting), photographic, abstract, be loaded with narrative content, symbolistic (as in Symbolist art), emotive (as in Expressionism), or be political in nature (as in Artivism). A portion of the history of painting in both Eastern and Western art is dominated by spiritual motifs and ideas; examples of this kind of painting range from artwork depicting mythological figures on pottery to Biblical scenes rendered on the interior walls and ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, to scenes from the life of Buddha or other images of eastern religious origin. The oldest known paintings are at the Grotte Chauvet in France, which some historians believe are about 32,000 years old. They are engraved and painted using red ochre and black pigment and show horses, rhinoceros, lions, buffalo, mammoth, abstract designs and what are possibly partial human figures. However the earliest evidence of the act of painting has been discovered in two rock-shelters in Arnhem Land, in northern Australia. In the lowest layer of material at these sites, there are used pieces of ochre estimated to be 60,000 years old. Archaeologists have also found a fragment of rock painting preserved in a limestone rock-shelter in the Kimberley region of North-Western Australia, that is dated 40 000 years old. There are examples of cave paintings all over the world—in India, France, Spain, Portugal, China, Australia, Mexico etc. In Western cultures oil painting and watercolor painting have rich and complex traditions in style and subject matter. In the East, ink and color ink historically predominated the choice of media with equally rich and complex traditions. The invention of photography had a major impact on painting. In the decades after the first photograph was produced in 1829, photographic processes improved and became more widely practiced, depriving painting of much of its historic purpose to provide an accurate record of the observable world. A series of art movements in the late 19th and early 20th centuries—notably Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, and Dadaism—challenged the Renaissance view of the world. Eastern and African painting, however, continued a long history of stylization and did not undergo an equivalent transformation at the same time. Modern and Contemporary Art has moved away from the historic value of craft and documentation in favour of concept; this led some to say in the 1960s that painting, as a serious art form, is dead. This has not deterred the majority of living painters from continuing to practice painting either as whole or part of their work. The vitality and versatility of painting in the 21st century belies the premature declarations of its demise. In an epoch characterized by the idea of pluralism, there is no consensus as to a representative style of the age. Artists continue to make important works of art in a wide variety of styles and aesthetic temperaments—their merit left to the marketplace to judge. Among the continuing and current directions in painting at the beginning of the 21st century are Monochrome painting, Hard-edge painting, Geometric abstraction, Appropriation, Hyperrealism, Photorealism, Expressionism, Minimalism, Lyrical Abstraction, Pop Art, Op Art, Abstract Expressionism, Color Field painting, Neo-expressionism, Collage, Intermedia painting, Assemblage painting, Computer art painting, Postmodern painting, Neo-Dada painting, Shaped canvas painting, environmental mural painting, traditional figure painting, Landscape painting, Portrait painting, and paint-on-glass animation.
How to recognize Baroque art
 
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A conversation with Dr. Steven Zucker and Dr. Beth Harris about how to recognize Baroque art.
Views: 182170 Smarthistory
THE ART OF ILLUSTRATION PART 1
 
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This video is the first of two outlining the history of illustration
Views: 10932 pete beard
Exhibition showcases colourful works of naive art
 
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(14 Aug 2017) LEADIN: An exhibition in Brussels is showcasing a colourful collection of works of modern naive art. The biennale show is dedicated to paintings and sculptures in the simple, naive style - often created by artists who have no formal training. STORYLINE A colourful papier mache cat peers at visitors. It's one of the many works on display at Belgian Naive Art Biennale, created by artists from all over the world. Naive art is characterised by a colourful, unsophisticated, almost childlike style. Traditionally, naive artists have had no formal artistic training and do not follow artistic "rules" such as perspective or naturalistic form. Perhaps the most famous artist in the naive style was the 19th century French painter Henri Rousseau, best known for his jungle scenes. Works at the Brussels Biennale include paintings as well as papier-mache statues, and other more unusual materials. Artist Chantal Nyssen created her "The Fairy of the Lienne" from a puzzle of hundreds of tiny, coloured eggshell pieces. Catherine Schmitz, the biennale's curator, says the naive style is seeing a resurgence in popularity. "There were quite a few biennales of naive art 10 to 20 years ago. Then we had a period during which there were fewer of them, and now it's true that naive art is enjoying a second youth. The first edition of our biennale was in 2007, so it's ten years. This is the 6th edition," she says. This year's biennale features different interpretations of naive art around the world, with works by European as well as Central and South American artists. Depicting details is an important aspect of naive art, with artists often painstakingly painting the tiniest items of lace, carpet or even the face of every single person attending a football match. Naive art might at first glance appear superficial, but Schmitz says there's more to it than meets the eye. "When we talk about naive art we think of innocence, pleasure, of childhood memories. It's true that it features pastel colours, roses, infantile and nostalgic themes, kittens, etc. But this is not all: naive art is also a way to look at things. We talk about intellectual realism versus visual realism because artists don't show things as they see them but as they know them," she says. A lack of visual perspective is another common feature of the naive style. What matters is not reality, but the way the artist perceives reality at a specific moment, says Italian painter Paola Cenci. "Painting naive art offers a sense of tranquillity and my artistic path has been guided by this. I would walk in a place, here, for example, I was in Bracciano and saw the lake, the colours, and this gave me the inspiration to create a naive painting. It shouldn't be realistic but, through colours, it should evoke the feelings I had when I saw this beautiful, relaxing scene. For me the purpose of naive art is to inspire joy," she says. For the Belgian painter Jean Pierre Lorand, dreams also play a starring role and are often a way to, albeit briefly, escape from reality. "These days it's more and more important to create an escape. There's a need to share dreams and beautiful things all around us," Lorand says. The message is not lost on visitors like Jean Sacre, who says he enjoys the escapism on offer here. "Naive art is generally a very optimistic art form, very colourful," says Sacre. "With all that's happening in the world it has a more cheerful view and is very colourful. I like it very much." For the artist Monique Schaar, naive art has provided the means to channel the energy of her busy inner world. Brussels-born Schaar was awarded the first prize at the 2015 Biennale of Naive Art in Brussels and this year she's a guest of honour. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/7e0a156549b286f1e9b8f770719cb305 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 404 AP Archive
How to recognize Italian Renaissance art
 
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A brief introduction to Italian Renaissance art Speakers: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker
Views: 105903 Smarthistory
How to Draw Realistic Style Manga Characters, Like Street Fighter, Soul Caliber and Golgo 13
 
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Drawing in Exaggerated Naturalistic Manga Styles Bridgman's Complete Guide to Drawing from Life: http://amzn.to/1PtRWTT Heads, Features and Faces (Dover Anatomy for Artists) By Bridgman: http://amzn.to/1SQXEO6 Developing a Unique Drawing Style: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKVP4mSDmPg Drawing Style and Character Design Pointers: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzT_mXeuprg Style Vs. Versatility in Art. Which to Pursue?: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3JTtQHEjz4 Stick figures, with style! Basic design: http://www.thedrawingwebsite.com/2012/10/10/stick-figures-with-style-basic-design/ Design Simple Cartoon Characters from Flat Shapes: http://www.thedrawingwebsite.com/2012/11/07/simple-cartoon-characters-from-flat-shapes/ Making Your Cartoons Look Professional – Cartooning Design: http://www.thedrawingwebsite.com/2015/06/17/making-your-cartoons-look-professional-cartooning-design/ Monkey Style Draw Fu – Copying: http://www.thedrawingwebsite.com/2015/09/09/monkey-style-draw-fu-copying/
Views: 5386 Luis Escobar
Las Meninas: Is This The Best Painting In History?
 
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Get 10% any purchase here: http://squarespace.com/nerdwriter HELP ME MAKE MORE VIDEOS: http://www.patreon.com/nerdwriter ASK ME QUESTIONS HERE: http://thenerdwriter.tumblr.com TWITTER: https://twitter.com/TheeNerdwriter Email me here: [email protected] SOURCES: Joel Snyder and Ted Cohen, “Reflexions on "Las Meninas": Paradox Lost” Critical Inquiry Vol. 7, No. 2 (Winter, 1980), pp. 429-447 George Bauer and Linda Bauer, “Portrait Practice In ‘Las Meninas’” Notes in the History of Art Vol. 19, No. 3 (Spring 2000), pp. 37-42 Emily Umberger, “Velázquez and Naturalism II: Interpreting "Las Meninas" RES: Anthropology and Aesthetics No. 28 (Autumn, 1995), pp. 94-117 Marian Ortuño, “Reading Las Meninas: An Ekphrastic Approach to Teaching Don Quijote” Hispania Vol. 95,No. 4 (December 2012), pp. 681-697 Frederic Chordá, “Computer Graphics for the Analysis of Perspective in Visual Art: "Las Meninas", by Velázquez” Leonardo Vol. 24, No. 5 (1991), pp. 563-567 Gregory Minissale, “Framing Consciousness in Art: Transcultural Perspectives” Rodopi (May 5, 2009)
Views: 1423175 Nerdwriter1
Qu Leilei: A Chinese Artist in Britain
 
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A free exhibition at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford 7 Nov 2017 to 15 Apr 2018 Contemporary Chinese artist Qu Leilei (b. 1951), now based in London, was a founding member of the avant-garde ‘Stars Group’ in the late 1970s, and immigrated to England in 1985. This exhibition shows his progression from calligraphic collage to an exploration of a new vocabulary of ink language blending lively brushwork with western technique. Qu Leilei was born in 1951 in the northeastern province of Heilongjiang, China, and like many other Chinese artists received training in painting and calligraphy at an early age. He started his career as a founding member of the famous ‘Stars group’ in China but it was while living in Britain that Qu Leilei has formed his unique style of ink painting. The exposure to Western art, especially classical sculpture and Italian Renaissance painting, intensified his quest for perfection of naturalistic image of bodily beauty in art. His love of beauty for its own sake, and his long and careful studies of the anatomy and Renaissance old masters, have led to large and impressive life-like figure paintings which are the primary focus of the exhibition. The display features a variety of images ranging from small sketches of life drawing to larger highly refined figural paintings created from 1985 to the present, showing Qu Leilei's progression from calligraphic collage to an exploration of a new vocabulary of ink language. His confident use of brush and ink, allows him to blend western techniques with oriental aesthetics. Most of the works on display are drawn from the Ashmolean’s own collection with additional works on loan from the artist. We are most grateful for the generous support of the Jiangsu Art Reproduction & Culture Development Co Ltd, China.
Views: 3342 Ashmolean Museum
How Artists Grow Over Time (ft. Cesar Santos)
 
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In this episode we talk $h!t about Old Masters. Just kidding… We respectfully analyze how artists have grown throughout history. Cesar Santos and I visit the San Diego Museum of Art to talk about what artists know now that some of the Old Masters didn’t. We also sit down to do a master study drawing of a Sargent painting! If you missed it last time, Cesar Santos did a sketchbook tour while he was at my studio. Checkout his insane sketches (and paintings) here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djIk9Vgf2RU Subscribe to Proko: http://bit.ly/SubProko Watch More Proko: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dX4LbI_5kmQ&index=12&list=PLtG4P3lq8RHHg_swFvOyVnYxj8iqzgBT3 Full Access to Premium Videos - http://www.proko.com/store Don't miss new tutorials - http://www.proko.com/subscribe Course Package Deals - http://www.proko.com/package-deals Pose photo sets - http://www.proko.com/poses ----- Follow Cesar Santos: Twitter - https://twitter.com/santocesart Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/santocesart Website - http://www.santocesar.com/ Follow Proko: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/prokotv Twitter - https://twitter.com/StanProkopenko Periscope - @proko Instagram - http://instagram.com/stanprokopenko Tumblr - http://stanprokopenko.tumblr.com/ Google+ - http://bit.ly/stangplus Email Newsletter- http://www.proko.com/subscribe Watch More Proko: Latest Uploads: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djIk9Vgf2RU&list=PLtG4P3lq8RHH0YGMCXa4uWsHVwTDkDcpN&index=1 Figure Drawing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74HR59yFZ7Y&list=PLtG4P3lq8RHGuMuprDarMz_Y9Fbw_d2ws Art of Caricature: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOURPIkpPXk&list=PLtG4P3lq8RHEkeRGn6aFRct0kq4oDwwTa Popular Videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1EPNYWeEf1U&list=PLtG4P3lq8RHHR_SKsGtufNd8uo2L7_vTQ ----- Credits Producer - Stan Prokopenko (http://www.stanprokopenko.com) Artist - Cesar Santos (http://www.santocesar.com) Editing - Brandon Storer, Stan Prokopenko Production Assistance, Camera - Brandon Storer, Valentina Santos Music Used with Permission About Proko: Instructional How to Draw videos for artists. My drawing lessons are approachable enough for beginners and detailed enough for advanced artists. My philosophy is to teach timeless concepts in an entertaining way. I believe that when you are having fun, you learn better. I take pride in producing high quality videos that you will enjoy watching and re-watching. #museum #painting #art
Views: 44251 Proko
Pose like a pro- Making good poses for your OC's
 
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Due to popular demand, here's a video on creating good poses for your original characters. Thanks so much for your patience everyone, this video was a long long process. I hope this helps! Hey all! Thank you so much for watching! Please like, sub, whatever, and visit the weekly Art Tips group on Deviantart! Weekly Art Tips: http://weekly-art-tips.deviantart.com/ Draw-out-loud: http://draw-out-loud.deviantart.com/ Supplementary Materials: Tracy Butler’s Lackadaisy- lackadaisy.foxprints.com Extra Credits Tracer and Pose Design 101-https://youtu.be/1EJSAm6OFOs Songs: Fensters Explanation, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Half Bit, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Hyperfun, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) NoGoodLayabout, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Dreams - Joakim Karud Free Download: http://theartistunion.com/tracks/898eac Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b... Visuals (in order of appearance): Spirited Away created by Studio Ghibli and licensed by Disney Entertainment, Inc. Diesel created by Tyson Hesse and published by Boom Box Adventure Time trademarked and © Frederator Studios The Simpsons created by Matt Groening and © Fox Song of the Sea Artbook created by Tomm Moore and Cartoon Saloon Lilo and Stitch is trademarked and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. Big Hero 6 is trademarked and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. The Great Mouse Detective is trademarked and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. The Secret Life of Pets is trademarked and © Illumination Entertainment How to Train Your Dragon 2 is trademarked and © Dreamworks Pictures Finding Nemo is trademarked and © Pixar Inc. Tarzan is trademarked and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. Samurai Champloo is licensed by Funimation Hyouka is licensed by Funimation Inuyasha created by Rumiko Takahashi and licensed by Viz Media .Hack Roots licensed by Funimation Ouran High School host Club is licensed by Funimation Gravity Falls created by Alex Hirsch and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. Over the Garden Wall created by Patrick McHale and © Cartoon Network Studios Star vs. the Forces of Evil is trademarked and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. Moana is trademarked and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. Treasure Planet is trademarked and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. The Adventures of Tintin created by Hergé Sailor Moon created by Naoko Takeuchi and licensed by Viz Media Cardcaptor Sakura created by Clamp and licensed by NIS America Hey Arnold is trademarked and © Nickelodeon Sleeping Beauty is trademarked and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. Fairy Tale created by Hiro Mashima and licensed by Funimation Tangled is trademarked and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. Frozen is trademarked and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. Nisekoi created by Naoshi Komi and licensed by Aniplex of America Undertale is trademarked and © Toby Fox The Road to El Dorado is trademarked and © Dreamworks Pictures Cowboy Bebop is licensed by Funimation Tom and Jerry is trademarked and © Hannah Barbera Aladdin is trademarked and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. Kim Possible is trademarked and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. Spongebob Squarepants is trademarked and © Nickelodeon Mulan is trademarked and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. Miraculous Ladybug is trademarked and © ZagToon Toy Story is trademarked and © Pixar Inc. Hercules is trademarked and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. The World Ends With You is trademarked and © Square Enix Wreck it Ralph is trademarked and © Pixar Inc. Wii Fit Trainer is trademarked and © Nintendo Princess Tutu is licensed by AEsir Holdings Hotel Transylvania is trademarked and © Sony Pictures Zootopia is trademarked and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. The Last Exorcism Part 2 Studiocanal, Strike Entertainment and Arcade Pictures Silent Hill is trademarked and © Konami The Wizard of Oz is trademarked and © Warner Brothers Naruto created by Masashi Kishimoto and licensed by Viz Media Miraculous Ladybug is trademarked and © ZagToon Voltron: Legendary Defender is trademarked and © Dreamworks Pictures Emara is trademarked and © Eating Stars Studios Lackadaisy created by Tracy Butler Ranma ½ created by Rumiko Takahashi and licensed by Viz Media Silouette pages featuring Spongebob Characters from Cartoon snap: http://cartoonsnap.blogspot.com/2008/09/how-to-draw-lively-poses-spongebob-tip.html Tom and Jerry Line of Action Pages by Preston Blair The Incredibles is trademarked and © Pixar Inc. Jiminy Cricket is trademarked and © Disney Enterprises, Inc. Shrek is trademarked and © Dreamworks Pictures Silouette pages featuring Spongebob Characters from Cartoon snap: http://cartoonsnap.blogspot.com/2008/09/how-to-draw-lively-poses-spongebob-tip.html Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure created by Hirohiko Araki licensed by Viz Media
Views: 205267 Ando
How to Paint Oranges 8 Different Ways Part 1 LIVE: Discover Your Personal Art Style Painting Demo
 
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Part 1 of 2 Thinking about trying to paint in a different style? Not sure what you favorite art style is and want to explore more? Come join professional artist Dena Tollefson in her art studio! Dena shows you how to explore your personal style and try out different art movements and art techniques This creative exercise can be done in oil paint, acrylic, gouache, watercolor, pastels, colored pencil and more. We will discuss how to discover your own personal art style by examining art movements of the past and present- trying them on for size. This video we will paint an orange in 8 different art styles. Topics include art movements of realism, pointillism, cubism, fauvism, naturalism, minimalism, action painting, abstract expressionism and how you can paint in these styles to grow your creativity and develop your personal art style. Artists discussed- Rothko, Van Gogh, Serat, Gauguin, Matisse, Jackson Pollock, Grant Wood. This fun, relaxing video is a great way to unwind and increase your creativity. Tollefson is known for deep, vibrant colors in her signature painting technique. Find Dena Tollefson's favorite art supplies at https://www.amazon.com/shop/dena_tollefson As an Amazon Influencer, Tollefson receives compensation at no additional cost to you. My technique can be done in either oil paint and acrylic paint. Tollefson uses both palette knives and spoons to paint 3D, touchable, textured works of art on canvas. Be sure to subscribe to her channel for more painting tips. Learn more at her website https://www.denatollefson.com Tollefson is a Christian and her artwork is positive message, uplifting and healing. Collectors use her paintings for meditation, calming, and healing thought. Artist’s Statement: I am a Colorist and am known for contemporary realism focusing on botanicals and landscapes, especially ponds, flowers and skies. My sky paintings are my idea of how God created Earth with one breath. Every morning and every evening He creates a new sky for us. I employ vigorous brushwork and texture through the palette knife in my work so that people may experience along with me the "feel" of the painting. I find mosaics fascinating how the individual pieces all contribute to the whole- I want my paintings to have a similar idea where overlapping petals of paint all stand on their own and then contribute to the total. "I am always excited when someone connects with my artwork- I am delighted to share a vision of color and beauty with my collectors"- Dena Tollefson Dena Tollefson is an American artist whose bold contemporary paintings focus on joyful use of color, texture and movement, creating a low relief effect in paint- a hybrid between low relief sculpture, mosaic, and traditional painting. She is known for floral painting, especially how to paint sunflowers. Dena Tollefson (nee Dena Schaefer), born 1965, is a full-time, professional artist. Tollefson graduated from Iowa State University in 1988 and lived in Dallas Texas before returning to Iowa in 1991 where she developed her unique, highly textured painting style. She lives in Cedar Rapids, Iowa with her husband and family. Tollefson is represented in galleries nationally in New Mexico, California, Iowa, Wisconsin and Illinois. Her "Daubism" body of work is a unique process she developed, where "daubs" of individually mixed paint are applied with a palette knife. The largest daubs are applied with a serving spoon, allowing ridges of paint which catch the light and appear to dance and scintillate as the viewer moves past the painting. Tollefson’s work focuses on botanicals, ponds, skies, and her Corn Series of work, biographies where people are depicted as ears of corn. Her work is highly tactile. Museum, Corporate & Selected Private Collections Cedar Rapids Museum of Art, Cedar Rapids, IA. Farm Credit Services Omaha, NE Terso Solutions Corporation Madison, WI Iowa Department of Human Services, Cedar Rapids, IA Genesis Hospital, Davenport, IA Monsanto Corporation St Louis, MO Ronald McDonald Facility/Unity Point Health Cedar Rapids, IA Ruberry, Stalmack and Garvey Law Firm Chicago, IL Marion Arts Council Marion, IA Mercy Hospital Cedar Rapids, IA PCI Cardiologists Inc., Cedar Rapids, Iowa St Luke’s Hospice Cedar Rapids, IA StarcomMediaVest CEO, Chicago, IL St Luke’s hospital, Cedar Rapids, IA. United Fire and Casualty Owner, Cedar Rapids, IA Mableton Bank, Mabelton, GA Lil’ Drug Stores CEO, Scottsdale, AZ Two of Dena Tollefson's paintings are in the permanent collection of the Cedar Rapids Museum of Art. Her work hangs publicly and in private collections throughout the world.
Views: 135 Dena Tollefson
What is FIGURATIVE ART? What does FIGURATIVE ART mean? FIGURATIVE ART meaning & explanation
 
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What is FIGURATIVE ART? What does FIGURATIVE ART mean? FIGURATIVE ART meaning - FIGURATIVE ART definition - FIGURATIVE ART explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Figurative art, sometimes written as figurativism, describes artwork—particularly paintings and sculptures—that is clearly derived from real object sources, and are therefore by definition representational. "Figurative art" is often defined in contrast to abstract art: Since the arrival of abstract art the term figurative has been used to refer to any form of modern art that retains strong references to the real world. Painting and sculpture can therefore be divided into the categories of figurative, representational and abstract, although, strictly speaking, abstract art is derived (or abstracted) from a figurative or other natural source. However, "abstract" is sometimes used as a synonym for non-representational art and non-objective art, i.e. art which has no derivation from figures or objects. Figurative art is not synonymous with figure painting (art that represents the human figure), although human and animal figures are frequent subjects. Nor is it a synonym of realist art. The formal elements, those aesthetic effects created by design, upon which figurative art is dependent, include line, shape, color, light and dark, mass, volume, texture, and perspective, although it should be pointed out that these elements of design could also play a role in creating other types of imagery -- for instance abstract, or non-representational or non-objective two-dimensional artwork. The difference is that in figurative art these elements are deployed to create an impression or illusion of form and space, and, usually, to create emphasis in the narrative portrayed. Figurative art is itself based upon a tacit understanding of abstracted shapes: the figure sculpture of Greek antiquity was not naturalistic, for its forms were idealized and geometric. Ernst Gombrich referred to the strictures of this schematic imagery, the adherence to that which was already known, rather than that which is seen, as the "Egyptian method", an allusion to the memory-based clarity of imagery in Egyptian art. Eventually idealization gave way to observation, and a figurative art which balanced ideal geometry with greater realism was seen in Classical sculpture by 480 B.C. The Greeks referred to the reliance on visual observation as mimesis. Until the time of the Impressionists, figurative art was characterized by attempts to reconcile these opposing principles. From the early Renaissance, Mannerism and the Baroque through 18th-, 19th- and 20th-century painting Figurative art has steadily broadened its parameters. Nicolas Poussin (1594-1665), a French painter in the classical style whose work predominantly features clarity, logic, and order, and favors line over color, served as an alternative to the more narrative Baroque style of the 17th century. He was a major inspiration for such classically oriented artists as Jacques-Louis David, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres and Paul Cézanne. The rise of the Neoclassical art of Jacques-Louis David ultimately engendered the realistic reactions of Gustave Courbet and Édouard Manet leading to the multi-faceted figurative art of the 20th century.
Views: 3096 The Audiopedia
What is CONTEMPORARY REALISM? What does CONTEMPORARY REALISM mean?
 
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What is CONTEMPORARY REALISM? What does CONTEMPORARY REALISM mean? CONTEMPORARY REALISM meaning - CONTEMPORARY REALISM definition - CONTEMPORARY REALISM explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ The contemporary realism movement is a North American style of painting which came into existence c. 1960s and early 1970s. Featuring a straightforward approach to representation practiced by artists such as Philip Pearlstein, Alex Katz, Jack Beal and Neil Welliver. The movement refers to figurative art works created in a natural yet highly objective style. Today the term Contemporary Realism encompasses all post-1970 sculptors and painters whose discipline is representational art, where the object is to portray the "real" and not the "ideal". Some Contemporary Realists, like Beal and Rackstraw Downes, began as trained abstract painters. (Abstract Expressionism had been well-established by c. 1960.) Rural artist enclaves (e.g., The Hamptons; areas of Maine) encouraged naturalistic imagery for some. Others shared approaches and methods of Photorealism. Some art schools, notably the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, have continued to nurture the legacy of 19th-century American Realist painting; Yale has seen a loose, inter-generational network of representational painters over the past few decades. The New York Academy of Art continues to further contemporary figurative art. A number of women artists have been prominently associated with stylistic variants of contemporary realism, including (not limited to) Jane Freilicher, Jane Wilson, Lois Dodd, Janet Fish, Catherine Murphy, Yvonne Jacquette and Martha Mayer Erlebacher.
Views: 229 The Audiopedia
pOLKA tRASH tATTOO | tRASH aRT | Timelapse | Xpose Tattoos Jaipur
 
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pOLKA tRASH tATTOO | tRASH aRT | Timelapse | Xpose Tattoos Jaipur Realistic trash polka is a painterly tattoo style which is a combination of “realism and trash; the nature and the abstract; technology and humanity; past, present, and future. This style looks a lot like collaging with a combination of naturalistic and photo-realistic elements and geometric graphics and lettering: the final result is quite a chaotic piece. The main characteristic of trash polka is contrast: the details of photo realism opposed to the simplicity of graphic elements, black vs red, over full spaces and empty spaces on the skin. The style is fairly new and very bold, so not many tattoo artists are doing trash polka tattoos. for more info, Contact📞: +917568000888 Website: http://tattoosjaipur.com Address: 3rd floor, Crystal Palm Mall, 22 Godam Circle, Jaipur Facebook👥: www.facebook.com/XposeTattoosJaipur Snapchat👻: phoenix_xpose 📧mail: [email protected] #xposetattoos #instalove #tattoo #tattoos #tattooist #tattoolife #instadaily #tattooed #tattooer #ink #inked #tattoodesigns #tattooedgirls #india #rajasthan #jaipur #tattooartistinjaipur #tattooinjaipur #tattooflash #tattooing #blog #tattoogirls #tattooart #tattoooftheday #tattooidea #tattootime #tattoostudio #tattoomaker pOLKA tRASH tATTOO | tRASH aRT | Timelapse | Xpose Tattoos Jaipur
Views: 516 Xpose Tattoos
In Search of Fra Angelico: The Artist as a Young Man
 
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Laurence Kanter Friday, February 2, 2018, 1:30 pm Over the past two decades, discoveries made in museums around the world have led to a new understanding of the early career of one of the towering masters of the Italian Renaissance, the artist known today as Fra Angelico. Now, conservation work at the Yale University Art Gallery has uncovered what may be Angelico’s first documented painting—long thought to have been lost—and opens new perspectives on the key role he played in the opening years of the 15th century in the formation of a modern style of naturalistic representation. Laurence Kanter, Chief Curator and the Lionel Goldfrank III Curator of European Art, addresses the early work of Fra Angelico. Generously sponsored by the John Walsh Lecture and Education Fund.
History of Modern Art Documentary
 
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#Modernart Please order ebook/audiobook of this video to support our channel https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/694050, https://www.amazon.co.uk/History-of-Modern-Art/dp/B01N6ERAWR/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1539455569&sr=1-1&keywords=History+of+Modern+Art+introbooks or https://www.audible.com/pd/History-of-Modern-Art-Audiobook/B01NBIJNW2?qid=1539455575&sr=sr_1_1&ref=a_search_c3_lProduct_1_1&pf_rd_p=e81b7c27-6880-467a-b5a7-13cef5d729fe&pf_rd_r=TB32F9DPKHWNH4KRZ3BD& Various forms of art such as Impressionism, Pointillism, Art nouveau, post impressionism, fauvism, expressionism, cubism, futurism, de stijl, abstract expressionism and minimalism are being discussed in detail along with the famous artists who have contributed for the modernized art forms in this documentary.
Views: 49456 Education Channel
John Everett Millais (1829-1896) A collection of paintings 4K
 
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Sir John Everett Millais (1829-1896) was an English painter and illustrator who was one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. He was a child prodigy who, aged eleven, became the youngest student to enter the Royal Academy Schools. The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was founded at his family home in London, at 83 Gower Street. Millais became the most famous exponent of the style, his painting Christ in the House of His Parents (1850) generating considerable controversy, and painting perhaps the embodiment of the school, Ophelia, in 1850-51. By the mid-1850s Millais was moving away from the Pre-Raphaelite style to develop a new form of realism in his art. His later works were enormously successful, making Millais one of the wealthiest artists of his day, but some former admirers including William Morris saw this as a sell-out. While these and early 20th-century critics, reading art through the lens of Modernism, viewed much of his later production as wanting, this perspective has changed in recent decades, as his later works have come to be seen in the context of wider changes and advanced tendencies in the broader late nineteenth-century art world, and can now be seen as predictive of the art world of the present. Millais's personal life has also played a significant role in his reputation. His wife Effie was formerly married to the critic John Ruskin, who had supported Millais's early work. The annulment of the marriage and her wedding to Millais have sometimes been linked to his change of style, but she became a powerful promoter of his work and they worked in concert to secure commissions and expand their social and intellectual circles. Millais was born in Southampton, England in 1829, of a prominent Jersey-based family. His parents were John William Millais and Emily Mary Millais. Most of his early childhood was spent in Jersey, to which he retained a strong devotion throughout his life. The author Thackeray once asked him "when England conquered Jersey." Millais replied "Never! Jersey conquered England." The family moved to Dinan in Brittany for a few years in his childhood. His mother's "forceful personality" was the most powerful influence on his early life. She had a keen interest in art and music, and encouraged her son's artistic bent, promoting the relocating of the family to London to help develop contacts at the Royal Academy of Art. He later said "I owe everything to my mother." His prodigious artistic talent won him a place at the Royal Academy schools at the unprecedented age of eleven. While there, he met William Holman Hunt and Dante Gabriel Rossetti with whom he formed the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in September 1848 in his family home on Gower Street, off Bedford Square. Millais's Christ in the House of His Parents (1849–50) was highly controversial because of its realistic portrayal of a working class Holy Family labouring in a messy carpentry workshop. Later works were also controversial, though less so. Millais achieved popular success with A Huguenot (1851–52), which depicts a young couple about to be separated because of religious conflicts. He repeated this theme in many later works. All these early works were painted with great attention to detail, often concentrating on the beauty and complexity of the natural world. In paintings such as Ophelia (1851–1852), Millais created dense and elaborate pictorial surfaces based on the integration of naturalistic elements. This approach has been described as a kind of "pictorial eco-system." Mariana is a painting that Millais painted in 1850-51 based on the play Measure for Measure by William Shakespeare and the poem of the same name by Alfred, Lord Tennyson from 1830. In the play, the young Mariana was to be married but was rejected by her betrothed when her dowry was lost in a shipwreck. This style was promoted by the critic John Ruskin, who had defended the Pre-Raphaelites against their critics. Millais's friendship with Ruskin introduced him to Ruskin's wife Effie. Soon after they met she modelled for his painting The Order of Release. As Millais painted Effie they fell in love. Despite having been married to Ruskin for several years, Effie was still a virgin. Her parents realised something was wrong and she filed for an annulment. Thank you, please subscribe for future videos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0gMk3w9hw8BbtqoUpEMKeg?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 183 Master Painters
FANTASTIC ART {FANTASY ART } MOVEMENT | FANTASTIC ART [ FANTASY ART ] MOVEMENT  VIDEO DOCUMENTARY
 
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http://www.youtube.com/c/ArtHistoryPhilosophyofLifeChannel?sub_confirmation=1 If you find this video somewhat helpful pls do not hesitate to subscribe to our channel for more videos. I really Thank you for dedicating your precious time watching this video. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ FANTASTIC ART {FANTASY ART } MOVEMENT | FANTASTIC ART [ FANTASY ART ] MOVEMENT VIDEO DOCUMENTARY ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ IS A BROAD AND LOOSELY DEFINED ART GENRE. IT IS NOT RESTRICTED TO A SPECIFIC SCHOOL OF ARTISTS,GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION OR HISTORICAL PERIOD.IT CAN BE CHARACTERISED BY SUBJECT MATTER – WHICH PORTRAYS NON-REALISTIC,MYSTICAL, MYTHICAL OR FOLKLORIC SUBJECTS OR EVENTS – AND STYLE, WHICH IS REPRESENTATIONAL AND NATURALISTIC,RATHER THAN ABSTRACT - OR IN THE CASE OF MAGAZINE ILLUSTRATIONS AND SIMILAR,IN THE STYLE OF GRAPHIC NOVEL ART SUCH AS MANGA.FANTASY HAS BEEN AN INTEGRAL PART OF ART SINCE ITS BEGINNINGS,BUT HAS BEEN PARTICULARLY IMPORTANT IN MANNERISM,MAGIC REALIST PAINTING, ROMANTIC ART,SYMBOLISM, SURREALISM AND LOWBROW.IN FRENCH, THE GENRE IS CALLED LE FANTASTIQUE,IN ENGLISH IT IS SOMETIMES REFERRED TO AS VISIONARY ART,GROTESQUE ART OR MANNERIST ART.IT HAS HAD A DEEP AND CIRCULARINTERACTION WITH FANTASY LITERATURE.THE SUBJECT MATTER OF FANTASTIC ART MAY RESEMBLETHE PRODUCT OF HALLUCINATIONS,AND FANTASTIC ARTIST RICHARD DADD SPENT MUCHOF HIS LIFE IN MENTAL INSTITUTIONS.SALVADOR DALÍ FAMOUSLY SAID: "THE ONLY DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ME..."AND A MADMAN IS THAT I AM NOT MAD". SOME RECENT FANTASTIC ART DRAWS ON THE ARTIST'S EXPERIENCE, OR PURPORTED EXPERIENCE, OF HALLUCINOGENIC DRUGS.THE TERM FANTASY ART IS CLOSELY RELATED, AND IS APPLIED PRIMARILY TO RECENT ART (TYPICALLY 20TH CENTURY ONWARDS) INSPIRED BY,OR ILLUSTRATING, FANTASY LITERATURE.THE TERM HAS ACQUIRED SOME PEJORATIVE OVERTONES.FANTASTIC ART HAS TRADITIONALLY BEEN LARGELY CONFINED TO PAINTING AND ILLUSTRATION,BUT SINCE THE 1970S HAS INCREASINGLY BEEN FOUND ALSO IN PHOTOGRAPHY.FANTASTIC ART EXPLORES FANTASY, IMAGINATION, THEDREAM STATE, THE GROTESQUE, VISIONS AND THE UNCANNY, AS WELL AS SO-CALLED "GOTH" ART.GENRES WHICH MAY ALSO BE CONSIDERED AS FANTASTIC ART INCLUDE THE SYMBOLISM OF THE VICTORIAN ERA, AND SURREALISM. WORKS BASED ON CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY, WHICH HAVE BEEN A STAPLE OF EUROPEAN ART FROM THE RENAISSANCE PERIOD, ALSO ARGUABLY MEET THE DEFINITION OF FANTASTIC ART, AS ART BASED ON MODERN MYTHOLOGY SUCH AS JRR TOLKIEN'S MIDDLE EARTH MYTHOS UNQUESTIONABLY DOES.RELIGIOUS ART ALSO DEPICTS SUPERNATURAL OR MIRACULOUS SUBJECTS IN A NATURALISTIC WAY, BUT IS NOT GENERALLY REGARDED AS FANTASTIC ART. MANY ARTISTS HAVE PRODUCED WORKS WHICH FIT THE DEFINITION OF FANTASTIC ART. SOME, SUCH AS NICHOLAS ROERICH, WORKED ALMOST EXCLUSIVELY IN THE GENRE, OTHERS SUCH AS HIERONYMUS BOSCH, WHO HAS BEEN DESCRIBED AS THE FIRST "FANTASTIC" ARTIST IN THE WESTERN TRADITION, PRODUCED WORKS BOTH WITH AND WITHOUT FANTASTIC ELEMENTS, AND FOR ARTISTS SUCH AS FRANCISCO DE GOYA. -------------------------------------------------------- ARTICLE SOURCE : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fantastic_art ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Important note: due to copyright limitations in Europe all the images inside any video are for indicative art purpose only, it does not necessarily done by the artist himself the video is talking about or the art movement a video talks about. sorry if it might seem to be a misleading. I will try to append at the end of any video the reference link so in case the artworks needed to be seen by viewer it would be easy to find. Thnx
How to use Gimp like an Artist (How to draw in Gimp)
 
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How to use Gimp - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SoP5LOFxPeY&list=UUlm7crl7splsP-DmxEyvkgg Sketch Method - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7OhrjopCjmA Blob Method - http://www.deviantart.com/art/Complete-Digital-Painting-and-GIMP-Tutorial-339824344 FreeGimp's Method - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxCDOUqc5-c open up gimp and create a new file. make the file size at least 1000 by 1000. I’m making it 1080 by 1920 pixels. Also we need to go into advanced options. And change the X resolution and the Y resolution. Change it to about 300. Fill the image with white. The sketch method. make sure your tablet is connected to your computer. Then click the gimp tab and click Input devices. Click the icon that looks like a paintbrush. Mine says ‘Quartz Pen’. Go to mode: and change where it says ‘disabled’ and make it say ‘screen’ then click save. Now you can use your tablet with gimp. To test this out double click the paintbrush tool. Then where it says ‘dynamics’ change the dynamic to Pressure Opacity. Then draw lightly around your screen. Then try and apply pressure to your pen when drawing. If it got darker when you applied pressure then your tablet was successfully paired to Gimp. The paintbrush tool simply acts as a paintbrush by drawing wherever you draw. The paintbrush tool uses your foreground color as your ink. With the paintbrush tool we can change the brush shape by clicking this and choosing a few brushes. We can also change the size of the brush here. We will not change the Aspect Ratio and the Angle those must stay at 0. We can also apply dynamics. Basically these change how the brush works or draws depending on which one you select. For our purposes we will change the brush size between 3.0 and 5.0, We will be using 3 brushes. Those brushes are: Hardness 050, Hardness 100, and Pencil Scratch. You can use these brushes interchangeably, which one you use regularly is simply personal preference. We will also change the dynamics. Click on the dynamics button, then click on the bottom right hand corner and click this dynamics button. Now over here we will create a new custom dynamic. To do that click this paper icon. Name this. Pressure Opacity & Size. Then click these two boxes where it says Pressure Opacity and Pressure Size. Then close these two tabs. Now go back to dynamics and click Pressure Opacity & Size.Now it’s very comfortable to sketch pictures like this. I’m going to sketch a line-art. If you mess up you can simply use the eraser tool or click the undo button a few times. Now that our sketch has its basic shape we want to finalize it. To do that click this icon here and make a new layer. Make the layer transparent and click okay. Go and double click the ink tool. Make sure the opacity is 100, then click smooth stroke. Leave the quality at 20 and the weight at 50. Then go over to size and make it between 1.0 and 2.0. I’m making it 1.0. Then rename the transparent layer you just made by right clicking it and clicking edit layer attributes. Rename it to Lineart. Now trace over your sketch. For all the curvy parts use one smooth continuous stroke. Take your time. For all of the hard edges such as this. Make individual strokes that meet up on angles like so. If you can’t see your ink because the sketch is too dark below. Then simply change the color of the sketch, by using the fill tool and filling your sketched lines with a light-blue or red. Once you’re done. Make another layer by clicking here, except this time make it a white layer. Then drag that layer under the lineart layer. Now I know the lineart looks a little dumb; but now we’re going to make it a lot better. To do that rename the white layer to Coloring and shading. Then select the paintbrush tool. Make the size roughly 20, turn the dynamics off, and select the Hardness 050 brush. Then select your base colors. Mine will be red and blue, and start coloring in your picture. Don’t worry about shading or being accurate yet. Once you’ve added your base colors. You can start shading. To shade simply determine where the light is coming from. For us we’ll make it from the left. Then double click the doge and burn tool. Keep the brush at hardness 050, and the size at 20. Make sure dynamics are off. Keep the opacity at 100, and make the exposure 100 as well. Then Select dodge. Dodge makes the colors you go over brighter. To make certain colors brighter using dodge click shadows or highlights. Shadows make darker colors like blue brighter. Highlights make lighter colors like red brighter. (you should only use highlights for shiny objects like metals or liquids for realistic affect) Since we covered our image with base tones there’s no need to select the mid-tone option. Now we’ll select the burn option. The burn option makes whatever area we want; darker or in other words gives it shadow. We’ll toggle between highlights and shadows while using the burn tool.
Views: 304470 GalacticsTutorials
Pablo Picasso - Great Cubism Collection - Inside Museum
 
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For more Picasso Movies check this playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJr8DXQAZXG055wPdYJ8to45GWA19C_IU To Subscribe to This Channel: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=starartsproductions Pablo Ruiz Picasso, born 25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973, was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, stage designer, poet and playwright who spent most of his adult life in France. Regarded as one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture, the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore. Among his most famous works are the proto-Cubist Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (1907), and Guernica (1937), a dramatic portrayal of the bombing of Guernica by the German and Italian airforces during the Spanish Civil War. Picasso demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a naturalistic manner through his childhood and adolescence. During the first decade of the 20th century, his style changed as he experimented with different theories, techniques, and ideas. After 1906, the Fauvist work of the slightly older artist Henri Matisse motivated Picasso to explore more radical styles, beginning a fruitful rivalry between the two artists, who subsequently were often paired by critics as the leaders of modern art. Picasso's work is often categorized into periods. While the names of many of his later periods are debated, the most commonly accepted periods in his work are the Blue Period (1901–1904), the Rose Period (1904–1906), the African-influenced Period (1907–1909), Analytic Cubism (1909–1912), and Synthetic Cubism (1912–1919), also referred to as the Crystal period. Much of Picasso's work of the late 1910s and early 1920s is in a neoclassical style, and his work in the mid-1920s often has characteristics of Surrealism. His later work often combines elements of his earlier styles. Exceptionally prolific throughout the course of his long life, Picasso achieved universal renown and immense fortune for his revolutionary artistic accomplishments, and became one of the best-known figures in 20th-century art. Thanks for Watching! Subscribe for More Movies!
Views: 546 Star Arts
Alfred Stevens (1823-1906) A collection of paintings 4K Ultra HD
 
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Alfred Émile Léopold Stevens (1823-1906) was a Belgian painter, known for his paintings of elegant modern women. Alfred Stevens was born in Brussels. He came from a family involved with the visual arts: his older brother Joseph (1816–1892) and his son Léopold (1866–1935) were painters, while another brother Arthur (1825–99) was an art dealer and critic. His father, who had fought in the Napoleonic wars in the army of William I of the Netherlands, was an art collector who owned several watercolors by Eugène Delacroix, among other artists. His mother's parents ran Café de l'Amitié in Brussels, a meeting place for politicians, writers, and artists. All the Stevens children benefited from the people they met there, and the social skills they acquired in growing up around important people. After the death of his father in 1837, Stevens left middle school to begin study at the Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts in Brussels, where he knew François Navez, the Neo-Classical painter and former student of Jacques-Louis David who was its director and an old friend of Stevens's grandfather. Following a traditional curriculum, he drew from casts of classical sculpture for the first two years, and then drew from live models. In 1843, Stevens went to Paris, joining his brother Joseph who already was there. He was admitted to the École des Beaux-Arts, the most important art school in Paris. Although it is said that he became a student of its director Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, this is likely not true. An early picture by Stevens, The Pardon or Absolution (Hermitage, St. Petersburg), signed and dated 1849, shows his mastery of a conventional naturalistic style which owes much to 17th-century Dutch genre painting. Like the Belgian painter and friend with whom he stayed in Paris, Florent Joseph Marie Willems (1823–1905), Stevens carefully studied works by painters such as Gerard ter Borch and Gabriel Metsu. The single most important work from the second half of Stevens's career is the monumental Panorama du Siècle, 1789–1889, which he painted with Henri Gervex. Stevens painted the women and details and Gervex the men, with the help of fifteen assistants. It was shown to great acclaim at the International Exhibition held in Paris in 1889. He also received several great professional tributes. In 1895, a large exhibition of his work was held in Brussels. In 1900, Stevens was honored by the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris with the first retrospective exhibition ever given to a living artist. Supported by patrons led by the Comtesse de Greffulhe, it achieved social cachet as well as popular success. In 1905, he was the only living artist allowed to exhibit in a retrospective show of Belgian art in Brussels. Despite these exhibitions, he was not able to sell enough of his work to manage well financially. Having outlived his brothers and most of his friends, he died in Paris in 1906, living alone in modest rooms. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Stevens_(painter) Thank you, please subscribe for future videos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0gMk3w9hw8BbtqoUpEMKeg?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 125 Master Painters
LIVE Q&A with MoMA Curator Anne Umland (April 24)
 
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What does it take to be a curator at The Museum of Modern Art? Join Anne Umland on a tour of MoMA's Picasso gallery and a Live Q&A where she explores how curators decide which artworks go on display, how new exhibitions are designed, and even how to become a curator! Originally broadcast on Tuesday, April 24 at 6:30 p.m. EDT Learn more about Painting & Sculpture: http://bit.ly/2IhnOLa Subscribe for our latest videos, and invitations to live events: http://mo.ma/subscribe Explore our collection online: http://mo.ma/art Plan your visit in-person: http://mo.ma/visit The comments and opinions expressed in this video are those of the speaker alone, and do not represent the views of The Museum of Modern Art, its personnel, or any artist. #art #moma #museum #modernart #artist #paint #painting #sculpture #live #livestream #curator #askmoma
Contemporary West African art celebrated at exhibition
 
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Showcasing the creativity of some of West Africa's leading artists. The works here at the Mall Galleries near London's Trafalgar Square are providing a vivid glimpse of the region's colourful landscapes. These photo-realistic oil paintings are from Lagos-born artist Abiodun Olaku. His oil canvases are spread with atmospheric light, subtle shapes and vivid colour. According to organisers here, Olaku's unique style and haunting effect has made him one of the most sought after artists in Nigeria today. Now in its second year, this show - named 'Transcending Boundaries' - is celebrating the excellence of West African contemporary art and illustrating its growing global popularity. Among the eleven artists being showcased here are leading names, all well-known in their own respective countries. Curator, Anshu Bahanda, says the exhibition's name was inspired by the instructions she passed down to its artists. "Every artist I talk to, we were about trying to push boundaries," she says. "Trying to push emotional, psychological, national boundaries, trying to open up the world to their work. And one point, when I'd repeated this word, like the tenth time, I just stopped mid-conversation and said 'This is what I'm going to call the show, I'm going to call it Transcending Boundaries." Visitors aren't just encouraged to enjoy these artworks, they're also urged to take them home as every piece here is for sale - priced between 3,000 and 30,000 British Pounds (4,988 USD and 49,884 USD). Bahanda claims there's lots of underlying meanings behind the pieces in this collection of art work. Such as Nigerian artist's Ben Osaghae's acrylic painting - named 'A Poor People's Bank.' "It's about what happen, how people are treated in a poor country by the system, by the banking system and by system on the whole when they're into profit," she says. "So, a lot of the works are about socio-political commentary." If collectors are looking for a true taste of West Africa, then the oil paintings of Nigeria's Edosa Ogiugo may be just to their tastes. His works are unrestrained, bold in colour and often feature people gliding through the canvasses in full motion. Born in 1961, Ogiugo pioneered the Nigerian Guild of Fine Art that brings together full time studio artists from all over the country, giving them a collective voice. Now, he's had his works exhibited across Africa, Europe and America. Ogiugo says he communicates emotion through his pieces by putting a part of himself on canvas. "I think first I enter into the mood, so actually participate in what you see, so I'm like essentially part of the picture," he says. Another artist creating emotional pieces is Rom Isichei, a graduate of London's Chelsea College of Art and Design. Isichei, also from Nigeria, uses mixed media in order to provoke an avant-garde aesthetic. He constantly views his work as being in progression and transition, often spending weeks at a time applying layer upon layer to his canvases in order to create the desired affect. With this piece - named 'Basking in Sensous Regard' - Isichei says he intended to make it unrecognisable from up close, therefore people would have to take a few steps back to appreciate it. "I wanted to obscure the model portrait in such a way that, you need to go back," he says. "It's like creating a mystery, I wanted to encounter that mystery. Because, my works are naturalistic, very realistic, in a way they're expressionistic, so you need to go, take a stance, look at them, before you see what's going on." But it's not all just oil on canvas, there's also sculpture from West Africa. These elegant wooden sculptures were created by Ghana-born artist Reuben Ugbine. Bahanda says she believes it's linked to Africa's emerging economic status. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/5a9472287b2c199e6941eeae0500c5f4 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 165 AP Archive
JAPANESE LEGACY: Four Generations of Yoshida Family Artists
 
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A 2002 rare first edition exhibition catalogue which Bibliophile has specially imported and which was printed by the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. In 1953, the Japan Society of New York sponsored a 'Yoshida Family Exhibition' which featured 406 woodblock prints by Hiroshi (1876-1950), his wife Fujio (1887-1987), their sons Toshi (1911-95) and Hodaka (1926-95); Hodaka's wife Chizuko (born 1924), and his middle son Kobun (born 1945). This one-family art movement focussed on the 'creative print' (sosaku-hanga) instead of the 'new print' (shin-hanga) movement of which Hiroshi was a leading member. Here are abstractions as well as naturalistic woodcuts, watercolours and oil paintings, printmaking. The family developed their style by studying, teaching and exhibiting in North America as well as drawing inspiration from frequent travel around the world. The eight persons represented in the show for this exhibition catalogue spanned four generations from ancient Japanese tradition to modernity. The Yoshidas can trace their artistic beginnings to the Edo period (1615-1868), when they served as painters to the Nakatsu Warrior clan. They adopted pupils with techniques from Western-style oil painting and the family depicted Africa's exotic animals, birds, nudes and houses from Latin America, created two of the largest woodcuts ever to be printed, one of tigers and the other of an eagle, each measuring about 144 x 199cm, almost 5 x 7 feet! Hodaka produced his monumental wall prints, the largest one Red Wall measuring 112 x 172cm. These and other striking examples make their appearance in glorious colour and large format in this super sized softback. There is a checklist by artist's name and title and the subjects are captivating, be they from nature, abstract design, waterfalls, flowers, colourful woodblocks, two cranes in the Dance of Eternal Love or Lion Attacking Wildebeest, Air Battle in China from 1941 and the Skyline of New York from 1928 to traditional cherry trees and volcanoes in Japan. ORDER YOURS TODAY:- https://www.bibliophilebooks.com/epages/Bibliophile.sf/en_GB/?ObjectPath=/Shops/Bibliophile/Products/84349
Views: 189 bibliophilebooks
Zambian artist uses ancient rock art to inspire his paintings
 
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(24 Apr 2016) FOR CLEAN VERSION SEE STORY NUMBER: 4030630 LEAD IN: A Zambian artist is calling for more protection of his country's ancient rock art. Dating back 12,000 years, several rock art sites in Zambia have been damaged by thieves looking to make money from selling segments of the ancient, precious stonework. STORY-LINE Zambia is well known for its wildlife and adventure sports, but for this artist it's the country's rocks that are most inspiring. Zenzele Chulu gets many of his ideas from the country's extensive rock art. Aside from being aesthetically interesting, rock art serves as an insight into earlier civilisations. This unusually naturalistic painting of an eland antelope is overlaid with abstract grid designs. According to Zambia's Visual Arts Council the earliest rock art dates from 10,000 BC and is ascribed to the Twa people - although exact dates have been disputed. Sadly a section of this rock at has been removed by thieves highlighting the precarious conservation status of some of Zambia's rock art. Back at his Lusaka studio, Chulu works on his paintings. He began painting realistic landscapes and has since evolved his style to more abstract works inspired by Zambia's rock art. He's exhibited across Africa, Europe and the Far East. "The original rock art that I saw actually had different layers. That gave me the idea that that was actually done at different stages of life. They would paint the first layer and then they would come again… So that also was embodied in my work, the way oil colours sometimes overlap. I blend the lines, the dots," he says. This exhibition is at Lusaka's Henry Tayali Art Centre. Isaya Higa, an expatriate in Zambia, has already bought eight of Chulu's pieces. "I think his painting has a way of grabbing your attention and evokes subtle and complex feelings through the combination of shapes and colours. I think that is the most important thing. And also what really struck me was his originality, and his uniqueness so to speak", he says. For Chulu these exhibitions are an opportunity to voice his concern about issues of vandalism, illegal rock quarrying and graffiti at rock art sites. "It's been a very disheartening finding that the authorities at times tend to be very defensive when it comes to the protection of these sites. But when you physically go there, that's when you see the reality that actually much of these sites are in danger of disappearing," says Chulu. Kagosi Mwamulowe is Director at the National Heritage Commission East-Central Region. He insists caretakers are being employed at some of the rock art sites. "If you are talking about one or two persons monitoring a ten square kilometre area sometimes it's not easy to mitigate. But otherwise the other engagement we have been involved in is to talk to the local communities so that they can be part and parcel of the conservation of our heritage." Here at the Avencion Group, a business development firm in Zambia, the staff sell Chulu's work from the office and has held exhibitions of abstract rock art and realistic landscapes. The number of rock art sites in Zambia is uncertain and many remain undiscovered. Mkoma, near Chipata, requires a local permit to access. Some of the rock art here at Mkoma is said to be schematic anthropomorphic, meaning it resembles people. More food for thought for Zenzele Chulu in continuing to reflect its artistic complexity through his own paintings. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/36b2a6d8ebd1128a78827faf754d2244 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 167 AP Archive
Pablo Picasso - Famous painters Bios - Wiki Videos by Kinedio
 
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Learn how to increase your general knowledge quickly with Kinedio's video encyclopedia. Short biographical videos about the life and work of famous painters Pablo Ruiz Picasso (1881 – 1973) was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, stage designer, poet and playwright who spent most of his adult life in France. As one of the greatest and most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture,the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore. Picasso demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a naturalistic manner through his childhood and adolescence. During the first decade of the 20th century, his style changed as he experimented with different theories, techniques, and ideas. Exceptionally prolific throughout the course of his long life, Picasso achieved universal renown and immense fortune for his revolutionary artistic accomplishments, and became one of the best-known figures in 20th-century art. Visit us at http://kinedio.com Wiki Videos by Kinedio - Wikipedia as a video experience. Famous Painters Category. Source: This video uses material of Wikipedia and Flickr. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pablo_Picasso https://www.flickr.com/photos/recuerdosdepandora/6628382451 https://www.flickr.com/photos/markart/236849245 https://www.flickr.com/photos/fort-greene/6966706368
Contemporary Realism Art Movement Video | Contemporary Realism Art Movement Video Documentary
 
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http://www.youtube.com/c/ArtHistoryPhilosophyofLifeChannel?sub_confirmation=1 If you find this video somewhat helpful pls subscribe to our channel for more videos. Thanks For dedicating the time to watch :) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Contemporary Realism Art Movement Video | Contemporary Realism Art Movement Video Documentary ------------------------- Contemporary Realism Art movement The contemporary realism movement is a North American style of painting which came into existence c. 1960s and early 1970s. Featuring a straightforward approach to representation practiced by artists such as Philip Pearlstein, Alex Katz, Jack Beal and Neil Welliver. The movement refers to figurative art works created in a natural yet highly objective style. Today the term Contemporary Realism encompasses all post-1970 sculptors and painters whose discipline is representational art, where the object is to portray the "real" and not the "ideal". Some Contemporary Realists, like Beal and Rackstraw Downes, began as trained abstract painters. (Abstract Expressionism had been well-established by c. 1960.) Rural artist enclaves (e.g., The Hamptons; areas of Maine) encouraged naturalistic imagery for some. Others shared approaches and methods of Photorealism. Some art schools, notably the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, have continued to nurture the legacy of 19th-century American Realist painting; Yale has seen a loose, inter-generational network of representational painters over the past few decades. The New York Academy of Art continues to further contemporary figurative art. A number of women artists have been prominently associated with stylistic variants of contemporary realism, including (not limited to) Jane Freilicher, Jane Wilson, Lois Dodd, Janet Fish, Catherine Murphy, Yvonne Jacquette and Martha Mayer Erlebacher. Real, Really Real, Super Real: Directions in Contemporary American Realism (San Antonio Museum Association, 1981; exhibition catalogue). Mark Strand, Robert Hughes, Timothy-Greenfield Sanders, Art of the Real: Nine American Figurative Painters (New York: Clarkson N. Potter, 1983). ---------------------------------------------------------------- Wikipedia Source Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contemporary_realism ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ http://www.youtube.com/c/ArtHistoryPhilosophyofLifeChannel?sub_confirmation=1 If you find this video somewhat helpful pls subscribe to our channel for more videos. Thanks For dedicating the time to watch :) Important note: due to copyright limitations in Europe all the images inside any video are for indicative art purpose only, it does not necessarily done by the artist himself the video is talking about or the art movement a video talks about. sorry if it might seem to be a misleading. I will try to append at the end of any video the reference link so in case the artworks needed to be seen by viewer it would be easy to find. Thnx
Painting Demonstration by Ryan S. Brown
 
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This is a painting demonstration given to students at the Center for Academic Study & Naturalist Painting (CAS) as an introduction to oil painting.
Views: 2236 Ryan Brown
Anastasia Samoylova - Fine Artist
 
01:10:04
Photographer Anastasia Samoylova appropriates naturalistic images of mountains, trees, flowers and the ocean from the internet to create layered, collage-like compositions that reinterpret the concept of landscape photography. Her talk is part of the i3: Images, Ideas, Inspiration lecture series, which features presentations by digital photographers, hardware and software developers and industry experts. Presented by MPS Digital Photography.
Views: 2132 School of Visual Arts
Primitive art
 
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Understanding the role of visual perception in Primitive art vis-à-vis the style.
Thomas Pollock Anshutz (1851-1912) - A collection of paintings 2K Ultra HD Silent Slideshow
 
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Thomas Pollock Anshutz (1851-1912) - A collection of paintings and drawings 2K HD Silent slideshow An American painter and teacher. Co-founder of The Darby School and leader at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Anshutz was known for his award-winning portraiture work and working friendship with Thomas Eakins. Thomas Anshutz was born in Newport, Kentucky in 1851. He grew up in Newport and Wheeling, West Virginia. His early art instruction took place at the National Academy of Design in the early 1870s, where he studied under Lemuel Wilmarth. In 1875, he moved to Philadelphia and took a class taught by Thomas Eakins at the Philadelphia Sketch Club, a class which would solidify a close relationship and influence between Eakins and Anshutz. In 1892 Anshutz married Effie Shriver Russell. The two spent their honeymoon in Paris, where Anshutz attended classes at Académie Julian. In 1893 they returned to Philadelphia. Later in his life he proclaimed himself a socialist. He retired from teaching in the fall of 1911 due to poor health and died on June 16, 1912. Eakins began teaching at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 1876, the same year that Anshutz enrolled as a student. Eakins was Chief Demonstrator of Anatomy and Christian Schussele was Professor of Drawing and Painting. In 1878 Anshutz became Eakins's assistant, eventually succeeding Eakins as Chief Demonstrator when Eakins was promoted to Professor of Drawing and Painting. In 1880, while still a student, Anshutz completed his first major work, The Ironworkers' Noontime. The Ironworkers' Noontime, Anshutz's most well known painting, depicts twenty-or-so workers on their break in the yard of a foundry. Painted near Wheeling, West Virginia, it is conceived in a naturalistic style similar to that of Eakins, although Eakins never painted industrial subjects. The piece was exhibited at the Philadelphia Sketch Club in 1881 and compared to Eakins's work by art critics. Art historian Randall C. Griffin has written of it: "One of the first American paintings to depict the bleakness of factory life, The Ironworkers' Noontime appears to be a clear indictment of industrialization. Its brutal candor startled critics, who saw it as unexpectedly confrontational—a chilling industrial snapshot not the least picturesque or sublime." It is now in the collection of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. Around 1880 Eakins became involved in photography, incorporating it into his classes and using it as a tool for his artwork. Anshutz and other students at the Academy started to make use of the camera, posing models and making prints for study. Anshutz participated in Eakins's The Naked Series, photographing nude models in seven pre-defined standing poses. He modeled for Eakins himself, along with colleagues such as J. Laurie Wallace and Covington Few Seiss, who would pose outdoors nude, often wrestling, swimming and boxing. Eadweard Muybridge eventually made his way to Philadelphia and Anshutz and Eakins helped build Muybridge's zoopraxiscope. Eakins was forced to resign from the Academy in an 1886 scandal that was sparked by his use of a fully nude male model in front of either an all-female or a mixed-male-and-female class. Anshutz did not defend his mentor, in fact, he turned against him. Anshutz co-signed a letter to the Philadelphia Sketch Club: "We hereby charge Mr. Thoms Eakins with conduct unworthy of a gentleman & discreditable to this organization & ask his expulsion from the club". Anshutz was promoted to Eakins's position at the Academy. Anshutz would briefly travel to Europe, focusing primarily on his teaching in Philadelphia. Numerous artists studied under Anshutz, including Elizabeth Sparhawk-Jones, George Luks, Charles Demuth, John Sloan, Charles Sheeler, Everett Shinn, John Marin, William Glackens, and Robert Henri. As a teacher, Anshutz, according to art historian Sanford Schwartz, "was known as much for his approach-ability as his sarcasm, which apparently wasn't of the withering variety." The Anshutz family regularly vacationed in Holly Beach, New Jersey which served as a creative place for the painter. There he experimented with watercolours, bright color palette, and simple compositions. He also photographed the natural environment, utilising the images as studies for paintings, specifically Holly Beach and trips down the Delaware and Maurice rivers. Although Anshutz experimented persistently with landscape painting, he was more well known for his portraiture, which won him numerous awards in the 1890s and 1900s. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Pollock_Anshutz
Views: 97 Master Painters
Pablo Picasso at Work in France - Vallauris (1949)
 
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For more Pablo Picasso Movies check this playlist on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJr8DXQAZXG055wPdYJ8to45GWA19C_IU To Subscribe to This Channel: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=starartsproductions Thanks for Watching ... Pablo Ruiz Picasso, born 25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973, was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, stage designer, poet and playwright who spent most of his adult life in France. Regarded as one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture, the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore. Among his most famous works are the proto-Cubist Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (1907), and Guernica (1937), a dramatic portrayal of the bombing of Guernica by the German and Italian airforces during the Spanish Civil War. Picasso demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a naturalistic manner through his childhood and adolescence. During the first decade of the 20th century, his style changed as he experimented with different theories, techniques, and ideas. After 1906, the Fauvist work of the slightly older artist Henri Matisse motivated Picasso to explore more radical styles, beginning a fruitful rivalry between the two artists, who subsequently were often paired by critics as the leaders of modern art. Picasso's work is often categorized into periods. While the names of many of his later periods are debated, the most commonly accepted periods in his work are the Blue Period (1901–1904), the Rose Period (1904–1906), the African-influenced Period (1907–1909), Analytic Cubism (1909–1912), and Synthetic Cubism (1912–1919), also referred to as the Crystal period. Much of Picasso's work of the late 1910's and early 1920's is in a neoclassical style, and his work in the mid-1920's often has characteristics of Surrealism. His later work often combines elements of his earlier styles. Exceptionally prolific throughout the course of his long life, Picasso achieved universal renown and immense fortune for his revolutionary artistic accomplishments, and became one of the best-known figures in 20th-century art.
Views: 3885 Star Arts
What is GENRE ART? What does GENRE ART mean? GENRE ART meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is GENRE ART? What does GENRE ART mean? GENRE ART meaning - GENRE ART definition - GENRE ART explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Genre art is the pictorial representation in any of various media of scenes or events from everyday life, such as markets, domestic settings, interiors, parties, inn scenes, and street scenes. Such representations (also called genre works, genre scenes, or genre views) may be realistic, imagined, or romanticized by the artist. Some variations of the term genre art specify the medium or type of visual work, as in genre painting, genre prints, genre photographs, and so on. Rather confusingly, the normal meaning of genre, covering any particular combination of an artistic medium and a type of subject matter (as, for example, in the romance novel), is also used in the visual arts. Thus, genre works, especially when referring to the painting of the Dutch Golden Age and Flemish Baroque painting—the great periods of genre works—may also be used as an umbrella term for painting in various specialized categories such as still-life, marine painting, architectural painting and animal painting, as well as genre scenes proper where the emphasis is on human figures. Painting was divided into a hierarchy of genres, with history painting at the top, as the most difficult and therefore prestigious, and still life and architectural painting at the bottom. But history paintings are a genre in painting, not genre works. The following concentrates on painting, but genre motifs were also extremely popular in many forms of the decorative arts, especially from the Rococo of the early 18th century onwards. Single figures or small groups decorated a huge variety of objects such as porcelain, furniture, wallpaper and textiles.
Views: 490 The Audiopedia
Helene Schjerfbeck 海萊內·謝爾夫貝克 (1862-1946) Realism Expressionism Finnish
 
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[email protected] Helene Schjerfbeck (July 10, 1862 – January 23, 1946, pronounced IPA: [he'le:n 'ɧærvbek] in Standard Swedish and IPA: [helɛ:n ʃærvbek] in Finland Swedish) was a Finnish painter. She is most widely known for her realist works and self-portraits, and less well known for her landscapes and still lifes. Throughout her long life, her work changed dramatically. Her work starts with a dazzlingly skilled, somewhat melancholic version of late-19th-century academic realism…it ends with distilled, nearly abstract images in which pure paint and cryptic description are held in perfect balance. (Roberta Smith, New York Times, November 27th 1992) Helena Sofia Schjerfbeck was born on July 10, 1862, in Helsinki, Finland (then an autonomous Grand-Duchy within the Russian Empire), to Svante Schjerfbeck (an office manager) and Olga Johanna (née Printz). When she was four she suffered a hip injury, which prevented her from attending school. She showed talent at an early age, and by the time she was eleven she was enrolled at the Finnish Art Society Drawing School, where her fees were paid by Adolf von Becker, who saw promise in her [ref. Ahtola-Moorhouse]. At this School Schjerfbeck met Helena Westermarck. When Schjerfbeck’s father died of tuberculosis on February 2, 1876, Schjerfbeck’s mother took in boarders so that they could get by. A little over a year after her father’s death, Schjerfbeck graduated from the Finnish Art Society drawing school. She continued her education, with Westermarck, at a private academy run by Adolf von Becker, which utilised the University of Helsinki drawing studio. Professor G. Asp paid for her tuition to Becker’s private academy. There, Becker himself taught her French oil painting techniques. In 1879, at the age of 17, Schjerfbeck won third prize in a competition organised by the Finnish Art Society, and in 1880 her work was displayed in an annual Finnish Art Society exhibition. That summer Schjerfbeck spent time at a manor owned by her aunt on her mother’s side, Selma Printz, and Selma’s husband Thomas Adlercreutz. There she spent time drawing and painting her cousins. Schjerfbeck became particularly close to her cousin Selma Adlercreutz, who was her age. She set off to Paris later that year after receiving a travel grant from the Imperial Russian Senate. In Paris, Schjerfbeck painted with Helena Westermarck, then left to study with Léon Bonnat at Mme Trélat de Vigny’s studio. In 1881 she moved to the Académie Colarossi, where she studied once again with Westermarck. The Imperial Senate gave her another scholarship, which she used to spend a couple of months in Meudon, and then a few more months in Concarneau, Brittany. She then went back to the Académie Colarossi briefly, before returning to the Adlercreutz family manor in Finland. Schjerfbeck continued to move around frequently, painting and studying with various people. Schjerfbeck made money by continuing to put her paintings in the Art Society’s exhibitions, and she also did illustrations for books. In 1884 she was back in Paris at the Académie Colarossi with Westermarck, but this time they were working there. She was given more money to travel by a man from the Finnish Art Society and in 1887 she traveled to St Ives, Cornwall, in Britain. There she painted The Convalescent, which won the bronze medal at the 1889 Paris World Fair. The painting was later bought by the Finnish Art Society. At this period Schjerfbeck was painting in a naturalistic plein-air style. In the 1890s Schjerfbeck started teaching regularly in Finland at the Art Society drawing school, but in 1901 she became too ill to teach and in 1902 she resigned her post. She moved to Hyvinkää, all while taking care of her mother who lived with her (the mother died in 1923). While living in Hyvinkää, she continued to paint and exhibit. "Schjerfbeck’s sole contact with the art world was through magazines sent by friends." Since she did not have art, Schjerfbeck took up hobbies like reading and embroidery. During this time Schjerbeck produced still lifes and landscapes, as well as portraits, such as that of her mother, local school girls and women workers, and also self-portraits, and she became a modernist painter. Her work has been compared to that of artists such as James McNeill Whistler and Edvard Munch, but from 1905 her paintings took on a character that was hers alone. She continued experimenting with various techniques such as using different types of underpainting. 海萊內·謝爾夫貝克(瑞典語:Helene Schjerfbeck,國際音標發音:[he'le:n 'ɧærvbek],1862年7月10日-1946年1月23日)是芬蘭畫家。她是芬蘭最受推崇的現代主義美術畫家之一。近年來她的作品受到越來越多的關注。
Views: 257 Tuen Tony Kwok
#FRESCOArtExpansionV5  - Artist Pablo Picasso
 
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Pablo Ruiz Picasso (/pɪˈkɑːsoʊ, -ˈkæsoʊ/;[2] Spanish: [ˈpaβlo piˈkaso]; 25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973) was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, stage designer, poet and playwright who spent most of his adult life in France. Regarded as one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture,[3][4] the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore. Among his most famous works are the proto-Cubist Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (1907), and Guernica (1937), a dramatic portrayal of the bombing of Guernica by the German and Italian airforces. Picasso demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a naturalistic manner through his childhood and adolescence. During the first decade of the 20th century, his style changed as he experimented with different theories, techniques, and ideas. After 1906, the Fauvist work of the slightly older artist Henri Matisse motivated Picasso to explore more radical styles, beginning a fruitful rivalry between the two artists, who subsequently were often paired by critics as the leaders of modern art.[5][6][7][8] Picasso's work is often categorized into periods. While the names of many of his later periods are debated, the most commonly accepted periods in his work are the Blue Period (1901–1904), the Rose Period (1904–1906), the African-influenced Period (1907–1909), Analytic Cubism (1909–1912), and Synthetic Cubism (1912–1919), also referred to as the Crystal period. Much of Picasso's work of the late 1910s and early 1920s is in a neoclassical style, and his work in the mid-1920s often has characteristics of Surrealism. His later work often combines elements of his earlier styles. Exceptionally prolific throughout the course of his long life, Picasso achieved universal renown and immense fortune for his revolutionary artistic accomplishments, and became one of the best-known figures in 20th-century art. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pablo_Picasso
Views: 7 Play Ch
Jose Jimenez Aranda: A collection of 47 works (HD)
 
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In order for the LEARNFROMMASTERS project to continue its activity, YOUR KIND SUPPORT IS REQUIRED: PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/LearnFromMasters PAYPAL: https://www.paypal.me/LearnFromMasters --- José Jiménez Aranda: A collection of 47 works (HD) Description: "José Jiménez y Aranda was born in Seville, 7th February 1837, the son of a cabinet maker, he entered Seville’s Fine Art School at the age of fourteen, as the pupil of Antonio Cabral Bejarano (1788-1861), Manuel Barron y Carrillo (1814-1884) and Eduardo Cano de la Peña (1823-1897). During his early years, he concentrated on lithography and portraiture, winning an honourable mention at his debut in the 1864 National Exhibition for “Orphan Girl”. In 1867 he moved to Jerez de la Frontera to undertake a commission for the Church of St. Michael and, in the same year, married. In 1869 he returned to Seville and opened a painting studio. His work now centred around genre scenes, like “The Second-hand Dealers” and “The Romance Sellers”. In 1871 he met Mariano Fortuny y Carbo (1838-1874) in Seville, who had been working in Rome and José Aranda later moved there with his wife, brother, Manuel (b.1848) and pupil, José Garcia y Ramos (1852-1912). Four years later, he returned to Spain, having already attained considerable recognition, both in Paris and Rome. His brother, Luis Jiminez y Aranda (b.1845), who had moved to Paris in 1874, negotiated terms with dealers; Goupil and Capobianchi, to represent José in the city. In 1878 he won a prize at the Paris World Exhibition with “The Spur-Stone” and made his debut at the Salon in 1879 with a work entitled “A Sermon in the Orange Trees Patio”, which was well reviewed in the magazine ‘L’art Contemporain’. Due to his tremendous success in Paris, his dealers persuaded him to move there in 1881, where he settled in Montparnasse. It is said that his hard work and comparatively secluded life, separated him from the cultural changes of the day. Certainly though, he maintained a great deal of respect among the many Spanish painters living in Paris. He exhibited regularly at the Salons until 1889, when Armand Gouzien wrote of his works in ‘La Illustracion Espanola y Americana’: “In the folklore paintings of Jiménez Aranda we admire the knowledge and cleverness of the composition, the acute study of the types, the truthfulness of the attitudes, the elegance of the finish, and the perfection of the drawing (…) His pictures are masterpieces of observation, with the serenity of descriptive works”. His Paris production is dominated by the ‘frock-coat’ theme, just as that made in Rome, in which, according to Aureliano de Beruete, the most important thing “(…) even more than technical execution, (is) the clarity of the scene represented. Neither doubts nor commentary on its meaning. Nothing of figures or objects too few or too many, under the pretext of seeking picturesque contrast or a note of colour to set the effect in to relief (…)”. (Quoted by Bernardino de Pantorba in ‘Jimenez de Aranda: Biographical and Critical Essay’, Madrid 1930. During this time his work was shown and awarded prizes constantly throughout all the major European cities. In 1890 José Aranda returned to Spain and settled in Madrid, where he won a first-class medal at the National Exhibition with “A Misfortune”. This period also saw a change of theme from the more typical genre painting, to the more naturalistic painting. This altering of focus was due largely to his brother, Luis Aranda, whose style was current with the French Schools of the period. In 1892, after the deaths of his wife and one of his daughters, he returned to live in Seville, where he taught in the Free Academy of Fine Art and held a chair at the Official School, becoming a Director in 1897. He visited France often, to see his brother and in 1900 submitted to the Paris World Exhibition, his “Drawings from Don Quixote” and won a gold medal. During his last years of his life, he went to Alcala de Guadaira to paint out-of-doors, creating a meeting point for local artists. He died in Seville on 6th May 1903 at the age of sixty-six. " --- SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/c/LearnFromMasters?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnFromMasters/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/learnfrommasters/ Contact: [email protected] LIST OF ARTISTS already posted on LearnFromMasters: https://goo.gl/hri4HE --- Thank you so much for your support! #LearnFromMasters #SpanishPainter #OnlineArtGallery #CollectionOfPaintings #ArtHistory #JoseJimenezAranda #TASCHEN
Views: 1697 LearnFromMasters

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