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Session6 Data type in Oracle
 
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Session 6: Datatypes In Oracle   ALPHABET           : A-Z , a-z NUMBER              : 0-9 (with precision and scale) DATE / Temporal  : any Date and time (Hours, Minutes, Seconds, Mili-seconds, Timestamp, Timezone etc)   Alphabet + Number = Alphanumeric Data                                     = String / CHARACTER Datatype Category Number                    =  Numeric Datatype Category Date                         = Date Datatype Category 1. CHARACTER Datatype: CHAR, VARCHAR, NCHAR: CHAR is fixed length datatype and VARCHAR is Variable length datatype to store character data. i.e. A-Z , a-z , 0-9 , all keyboard characters etc. The default size is 1 character and it can store maximum up to 2000 bytes. Example : EName, EmpID, PassportNo, SSN, etc. EName CHAR(10) := ‘TOM’; wastage of 7 space after the string EName VARCHAR(10) := ‘TOM’; Spaces can be Reuse which left after the string NCHAR additionally handles NLS(National Language Support). Oracle supports a reliable Unicode datatype through NCHAR , NVARCHAR2 , and NCLOB  VARCHAR2, NVARCHAR2: These are Variable length datatype. VARCHAR2 handles alphanumeric character string whereas NVARCHAR2 handles alphanumeric character string with NLS(National Language Support). The default size is 1 character and it can store maximum up to 4000 bytes.   LONG:  Variable length string.  (Maximum size: 2 GB - 1) Only one LONG column is allowed per table. RAW:    Variable length binary string (Maximum size 2000 bytes) LONG RAW: Variable length binary string (Maximum size 2GB) 2. NUMERIC Datatype: NUMBER: It stores Numeric values and performs numeric calculations. NUMBER,   NUMBER(n),   NUMBER(p,s) It stores Numbers up to 38 digits of precision. SeqNo NUMBER;                     1, 123, 12345678 EmpID NUMBER(4);                 1, 123, 1234 Sal NUMBER(7,2);                     23456.78 , 123.45 — correction in video: Sal NUMBER(a7,2); which is wrong please ignore. 1234567 can be a type of NUMBER, NUMBER(7), NUMBER(7,0) It can store both integer and floating point numbers NUMERIC(p,s) FLOAT:   Ex:  EmpSal FLOAT;    FLOAT(7)       Decimal Points allowed DEC(p,s), DECIMAL(p,s) , REAL, DOUBLE PRECISION INTEGER:   Ex:  SSN INTEGER;       Decimal Points are not allowed INT, SMALLINT 3. DATE Datatype: DATE: It stores DATE(Date, Month, Year) and Time(Hour, Minute, Second, AM/PM) and performs calculations with such data. Default DATE format in Oracle is “DD-MON-YY” Based on "Gregorian calendar" where the date ranges from “JAN 1 4712 BC” to “DEC 31 9999 AD” doj DATE;    “18-MAR-2010 12:30:00 PM” TIMESTAMP:    It can store all parameters as DATE datatype and additionally it can have “Fraction of seconds” and TIMESTAMP WITH TIMEZONE / TIMESTAMP WITHOUT TIMEZONE. Range from 0-9 digits, the default size is 6. 4. LOB Datatype: LOB: “Large Object” data. It can store pictures, motion pictures, Textfiles etc. CLOB: “Character Large Object” is used to store structured information like a text file with a specific file format. BLOB: “Binary Large Object” is used to store Un-structured information like Image, JPEG files, MPEG files etc. BFILE: “Binary File” is used to store the pointer to a specific file / Just store the location of a file. Maximum size: (4 GB - 1) * DB_BLOCK_SIZE initialization parameter (8 TB to 128 TB) Extra Information: NCLOB : It supports all the character set supported by CLOB and additionally it handles NLS(National Language Support ) Maximum size: (4 GB - 1) * DB_BLOCK_SIZE initialization parameter (8 TB to 128 TB) ROWID and UROWID(optional size) Datatype: contains fixed length Binary data. BBBBBBB.RRRR.FFFFF combination of BLOCK-ROW-DATABASE FILE Physical and Logical ROWID Upcoming Session: Session 7: Populating Data into Tables(INSERT Statement): Inserting data into all columns of a table Inserting data into Required columns of a table Inserting NULL value into a table Inserting Special Values(USER / SYSDATE) into a table Supplying data at runtime(using & and &&) THANK YOU :)
Views: 293 Prabhat Sahu
Oracle LENGTH Function
 
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https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-length/ The Oracle LENGTH function allows you to find the length of a string, also known as the number of characters in a string. It’s a common feature in different languages, and SQL is no different. The LENGTH function only has one parameter: LENGTH ( string_value ) The parameter is the string_value which is the value to check the length of. The function returns a number that represents the number of characters in the function. Some points to remember about the Oracle LENGTH function: If string_value is NULL, then LENGTH will return NULL. If string_value is an empty string, the LENGTH will return NULL. The string_value can be any of the character data types - CHAR, VARCHAR2, NCHAR, NVARCHAR2, CLOB, NCLOB. If the string_value is a CHAR data type, then the LENGTH will include any trailing spaces in the value. For more information about the Oracle LENGTH function, including all of the SQL shown in this video and the examples, read the related article here: https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-length/
Views: 371 Database Star
Oracle SQL Tutorial 32 - VARCHAR2 and NVARCHAR2
 
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This video we are going to discuss the VARCHAR2 and the NVARCHAR2 data types. The previous videos are a good foundation to this video. I've actually discussed so much stuff in those videos that I don’t have a whole lot to say. Good for you, right? I discussed over the previous videos that you should prefer to use VARCHAR2 over CHAR. That's because there is not a difference in performance or storage for a VARCHAR2 column. The only difference is that an CHAR column forces each value to take up a certain length even if it's not. There is one difference between the variable length and fixed length data types here that you need to know about, and that is storage limits. CHAR has a limit of 2000 bytes, while VARCHAR2 has a limit of 4000 bytes. That means you can store twice as much junk in a VARCHAR2 column! Other than that, these data types work exactly the same. I recommend you always use the VARCHAR2 data types instead of the CHAR data types, and only use NVARCHAR2 if you have a non-Unicode database. This will allow you to store Unicode characters in a column. Now, the amount of storage you can put in a VARCHAR2 column is twice what you can put in a CHAR column, but 4000 characters is still not very many characters. This is where the LOB data types come in, which we will discuss in the next video! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 5974 Caleb Curry
Oracle SQL Tutorial 24 - Important Data Types
 
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In the upcoming videos we are going to discuss data types in depth, but I don't want to drown you in all of the details. Because of that, I'm giving you this video which is going to introduce you to the most important data types. Then, in the upcoming videos, I'll describe them in more depth. One of the data types we've already discussed in this video is NUMBER. This data type is used to, obviously, store a number. It can be used to store integers (whole numbers), or numbers with decimals. There are two other numeric data types you should know of. BINARY_FLOAT and BINARY_DOUBLE are both numeric data types that are known as floating point numbers. A floating point number is often used for large numbers that have decimal places where it is acceptable to not be completely precise. What I mean by this is that these numbers can only store numbers correctly up to a certain decimal point. If you need perfect precision, you will want to use the NUMBER data type. Now storing numbers is good sometimes, but occasionally you will want to store string data. String data can be any sequence of characters, including numbers. By telling the database that a column is a string data type, the database knows how to treat that column. There are four important string data types that you need to know about. The first two are CHAR and NCHAR. These data types are used to store a fixed-length string. So for example, you can say you want to store 12 characters. This means that every value for this column will be exactly 12 characters. If you insert less than 12 characters, the data will be padded with spaces. This means you will want to use one of these data types when every value in the column is the same length. What is the difference between CHAR and NCHAR? CHAR uses what is known as ASCII while NCHAR uses Unicode. The difference is what characters are allowed and how much space each character takes. ASCII takes up less space but only supports English, numbers, and some symbols. UNICODE allows you to store characters from multiple languages but takes up more space. Those were both fixed-length string. What if you want to store data that changes in length? That is where VARCHAR2 and NVARCHAR2 come in. When it comes to storing dates, the data types that are most important are DATE and TIMESTAMP. Date can be used to store dates and time. Timestamp is a data type that can be used to store an exact moment in time. Lastly, there are interval types. These store a date range. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 7222 Caleb Curry
65. MODIFY COLUMN Data Type and Its Size with or Without Constraint in SQL (Hindi)
 
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Views: 8975 Geeky Shows
MySQL 26 - VARCHAR Data Type
 
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Varchar is very similar to CHAR in that it is used to store strings, but there are some pretty big differences. The first difference is that when you store data less than the max it does not pad it with spaces to make it fit. The benefit in this is that you will save storage. The downside to this is that now MySQL is going to have to keep track of how many characters you have. To do this, each value is going to have an additional byte or two that MySQL can use. The max length is 65535 bytes. That is per value in that column! But you have to keep in mind encodings. If your characters are encoded with something such as UTF-8, each character can take up multiple bytes. The max size for a character in this case is 3 bytes. That means that we really can't store that many characters. Additionally, MySQL has a row limit of 65535 bytes (potential bytes…meaning declared sizes). What does this mean? It means that if you make this too big, you are not going to be able to create other columns. Earlier I said that there will be an additional byte or two for each value you put into this column. The purpose of this is to keep track of how long the string is. Why one or two and not one? The reason being is because with one byte we can only count to 255. if we want to keep track of bytes after that we need two bytes. This means that we actually can't store quite 65535 bytes. Realistically, we can't store that much because we have to store the length of the string, and each character can take up to 3 bytes which can push us over the row limit. This means the real max is a little less than a third of that. Not every character is going to take up 3 bytes, but MySQL assumes it will as to not cut you short. This is slightly different than CHAR because char you can store up to 255 characters, not bytes. Even if you use an encoding where some characters take up multiple bytes, you can still store 255 of them. Remember that reason for this is that VARCHAR is subject to the row-limit. MySQL will not let you go past the max and will tell you the appropriate max, so don't worry about it too much. You should try not to push your limits. Plus, most of the time you will not come even close to the max for most columns. Should you use the max? Varchar will only store what is needed to store a value, but you should still try to have the max size no more than what is needed. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 8425 Caleb Curry
Oracle Database11g tutorials 13 || SQL substr function / SQL substring function
 
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link of SQL substr blog : http://www.rebellionrider.com/SQL-substr-function.htm SQL substr function SQL Substr function will return a sub string of a specified length from the source string beginning at a given position. Tool used in this tutorial is command prompt. This tutorial series is part of SQL expert exam certification training. if you are preparing for SQL certification you can use my tutorials. This SQL Tutorial is a part of free training. Copy Cloud referral link || Use this link to join copy cloud and get 20GB of free storage https://copy.com?r=j7eYO7 Contacts E-Mail [email protected] Twitter https://twitter.com/rebellionrider Instagram http://instagram.com/rebellionrider Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/imthebhardwaj Linkedin. http://in.linkedin.com/in/mannbhardwaj/ Thanks for linking, commenting, sharing and watching more of our videos This is Manish from RebellionRider.com ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- As the name suggests SQL Substr function will return substring from a given source string. Let's see the Syntax Substr (source_string, start_pos, Substr_length) As we can see SQL substr function takes 3 parameters. First one is Source string from which you want to extract the segment. Second parameter is Starting position for sub string from the Source string. And the third parameter is Substr_length which is the length for the substring. First two parameters are mandatory to specify while third one is optional. So we can say. SQL Substr function will return a sub string of a specified length from the source string beginning at a given position. First parameter source string can be of any data type CHAR, VARCHAR2, NCHAR, NVARCHAR2, CLOB, or NCLOB whereas both start_pos, Substr_length parameters must be number data type. The returning result of SQL Substr function is of same data type of source string. Let's see an example of SQL Substr function. SELECT substr('www.RebellionRider.com',5,14) FROM dual; Here in this query url of my website www.RebellionRider.com is our source string with the total length of 22 characters, Now, I want to extract the name of my website that is, RebellionRider. So if you count the total length of the name of the website, it is 14. That's why I have specified 14 as my third parameter of SQL Substr function which is substr_length. Also the name of the website RebellionRider is starting from 5th position therefore I have specified 5 at second parameter of SQL substr function which is strt_pos or starting position. Execute it. Here is our result RebellionRider When starting position is larger than the length of source string. In this case SQL Substr function will return NULL as a result. Let's do an example. SELECT substr('www.RebellionRider.com',23,14) FROM dual; As you can see here I have specified 23 at starting position and the total length of our source string is 22 characters Let's execute And the result is Null. Second scenario When the Substr_length is greater than source string In this case the segment return is the substring from starting position to the end of the string. For example SELECT substr('www.RebellionRider.com',5,23) FROM dual; Our starting position is at 5 means at the first R of RebellionRider and length of substring is set to 23 which is greater than the length of source string that is 22. Execute. As you can see we get a substring from first R of RebellionRider till the end of the source String. Third scenario When you supply numeric or arithmetic expression or a DATE instead of character as Source string to SQL Substr function In this scenario If you have supplied a numeric string instead of character as source string, the oracle engine casts them as a character when they occur as parameter to SQL Substr function. And if you have supplied Arithmetic expression or a DATE then The Oracle engine first solves or evaluates the Arithmetic expression or the DATE Then casts them as a character. Means if you have arithmetic expression in your source string then oracle will first solve it and then change or say cast the value of its result into character. Let's see some example. SELECT substr(50000-7,2,4) FROM dual; Oracle first evaluates the arithmetic expression that is 50000-7 equals to 49993. And then oracle engine casts this result 49993 into a character string. Means 49993 will be a 5 characters string. Starting position of substring is 2, that means from the first 9 of 49993 We specified the length of substring is 4 so we must get 9993 as our result. Let's check execute
Views: 82613 Manish Sharma
Oracle LEAST Function
 
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https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-greatest/ The Oracle LEAST function is a useful function, but I don’t think it’s very well understood. It returns the least or smallest value in a set of values. You can provide the values, and use numbers or text values. The syntax for the Oracle LEAST function is: LEAST(expr1 [, expr_n]) The expr1 is the first expression to use for your comparison. Expr_n is one or more expressions to use in the comparison, separated by commas. This is optional. So how is LEAST calculated? If the parameters are numeric, the LEAST function finds the smallest number. If the parameters are characters, the function finds the earliest value if they were sorted alphabetically (using their character values). What data type is returned? It depends on the parameters you provide. It could be the same as the parameters you provide, or VARCHAR2 if the parameters are all characters. You can also use the LEAST function with dates. It’s the opposite of the GREATEST function. For more information on the LEAST function, including the SQL used in this video and the examples, read the related post here: https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-greatest/
Views: 173 Database Star
Oracle LOWER Function
 
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https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-upper-lower/ The Oracle LOWER function is used to convert a string to a lowercase value. It’s useful for comparing text or string values that may have mixed case, such as user input or data from different tables. The opposite of the LOWER function is the UPPER function (which converts to upper case). The syntax of LOWER is: LOWER(input_string) The input_string is the string value to convert to a lower case value. It can be any of CHAR, VARCHAR2, NCHAR, NVARCHAR2, CLOB, or NCLOB. The return type is the same as the input type. You can use the LOWER function in a WHERE clause. However, unless you have a function-based index on the column, any indexes won’t be used. For example, if you have an index on first_name, a query that uses “WHERE LOWER(first_name)” won’t use this index. You’ll have to create an index on the LOWER(first_name) for this to be used. It’s not required, but it’s just something to keep in mind. For more information about the Oracle LOWER function, including all of the SQL shown in this video and the examples, read the related article here: https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-upper-lower/
Views: 60 Database Star
Difference between Replace and Translate function in oracle
 
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This video demonstrates the difference between a replace function and a translate function in oracle using an suitable example. Both the function does a similar task, but has a lot of difference in implementation and output when used. Be learning the difference users can easy justify the correct scenarios on where to use translate and when to use replace. If you want more such videos of exciting and amazing 'difference between' concepts, check out the links below : union and union all : https://youtu.be/n9FqQOd8liY char and varchar2 : https://youtu.be/039qzwjWf4k procedure and function : https://youtu.be/q3LmOenL120 in and exists : https://youtu.be/REX4IjRYlFw rank and dense_rank : https://youtu.be/WGSX998hZ9M delete and truncate : https://youtu.be/u76wMm2byXo %type and %rowtype : https://youtu.be/MlLUFeZ_3eM
Views: 2175 Kishan Mashru
MySQL 24 - Important Data Types
 
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I decided that instead of going through all of the categories of data types real slow, I'm going to give you a video that gives you the most important data types. That way, you can have a pretty good idea of what data types you need to use and when. Also, if any of the info in this video is too fast, you can watch the next videos to get a more in depth understanding. The first data type is CHAR. This data type stores a string that is of a fixed length. You will only want to use this when you know the length of the data for the column. For example, you might have a column for phone numbers. As long as you know that every phone number is going to be the same format, you could use a column with the CHAR data type. You would just specify it as CHAR(length). VARCHAR works in a similar fashion to CHAR, but it works best for variable length data. That means that if you have a column where each row is going to have a different length, you would want to use VARCHAR. For example, if you had a column for an email address, each email is going to be any number of characters. Now, we are going to be going into numeric data types. For each of the numeric data types there are two variations. Signed and unsigned. Signed data types allow for negative values, but the highest value will be lower. Unsigned do not allow negatives but can store higher positive numbers. INT is the data type you use when you need whole numbers. This is likely going to be the data type used for ID columns. DOUBLE is the data type that can be used when you need to store a real number. This means that there can be numbers after a decimal point. There is also a data type called FLOAT. This works similarly but cannot handle as many numbers after the decimal. These data types have the downside in that they often cannot be trusted when doing math. Only use DOUBLES for data where it is acceptable to be pretty close to correct. DECIMAL is a datatype that can be used for numbers where precision is extremely important. For example, Decimal can be used for columns dealing with money, important measurements, or anything where we need the data to work 100% as expected in arithmetic. TIMESTAMP is a column that is used to easily record an instance in time. This is often used to record when row is created or updated. That's because it will automatically generate a value when an INSERT or UPDATE is issued against the database. DATE, DATETIME, and TIME are all used to store dates and times. There are some differences between these and a TIMESTAMP, but I'll just give you one for now to tease you To understand the differences between these and the timestamp, you need to understand something known as UTC time. UTC time is a standard that you can compare against all time zones. It is known as coordinated universal time. So for example, PST is 8 hours behind UTC. The different between TIMESTAMP and these is that TIMESTAMP will convert whatever value to UTC when stored, and convert it back to whatever your time zone is when you retrieve it. This means that if you want to store a date that is going to change to the users time zone when retrieved, use TIMESTAMP. If it needs to stay the same no matter what, use DATETIME. If that's not super clear, we'll try to discuss it in more detail in an upcoming video. The goal of this video was not to teach you the intimate details on defining data types. The goal was to give you a rough over view of the main data types you will find in MySQL. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 9795 Caleb Curry
Char vs Varchar2 |Char vs Varchar2 in Oracle|Datatype in Oracle | Difference Between char & Varchar2
 
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Oracle DUMP Function
 
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https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-dump/ The Oracle DUMP function tells you the data type of an expression you specify. Specifically, this function returns a string that explains what type of data it is, along with the length, and an internal representation. The syntax of the DUMP function is: DUMP ( expression [, return_format] [, start_position] [, length] ) The parameters of this function are: - expression: this is the expression that will be looked at and will have information displayed from this function. It can be a column or any other kind of expression. - return_format: this is the format of the data to return. - start_position: this is the starting position of the expression to return the internal representation for. Does not impact the data type shown. - length: this is the length from the start_position that the internal representation of the expression is shown for. The DUMP function returns a VARCHAR2 data type. For more information about the Oracle DUMP function, including all of the SQL shown in this video and the examples, read the related article here: https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-dump/
Views: 122 Database Star
MySQL 32 - FLOAT and DOUBLE Data Types
 
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FLOAT and DOUBLE data types are data types that can be used to store numbers that can include decimal numbers. They are specifically used to store estimates. What do I mean? I mean that the precision of a FLOAT or DOUBLE value can be lost when doing math. The data types are only capable of maintaining a certain level of precision. The level of precision is usually adequate for most mathematical operations. If you need to store exact data, you will want to look into using the INT or DECIMAL data type instead. The numbers stored in a FLOAT or DOUBLE column are called floating point numbers, we'll see why in just a moment. Why are they called floating point numbers? let's look at a number. 150. This number could be represented as 150, or it could be represented as 1.5 * 10^2, or 1.5e2. With floating point numbers, scientific notation is used. These numbers are called floating point numbers because the decimal can float to different spots as we change the exponent. This means that the data type needs to store the number, how many decimal the number needs moved, and a sign bit. The benefit of floating point numbers is that they allow us to store pretty huge numbers. The down side is that they are not storing values exactly because they are limited in size. This means that only a certain level of precision is to be expected from a floating point data type. If you remember from the video of DECIMAL, precision is the number of digits in a number. As long as the precision for one of these data types exceeds the need for your specific data, the data type can work fine. For example, if you are storing a number like 15 trillion, you don't have to worry as much with precision as your number does not contain a lot of digits. This number can be represented as 1.5 x 10^13. This is a lot different than trying to store 1.5534534534 x10^13. Now we know both of these data types do not maintain a high number of digits correctly, but what is the difference between FLOAT and DOUBLE. The difference is the amount of storage they take up. Float takes up 4 bytes while DOUBLE takes up 8. The benefit in DOUBLE is that because it has more room to store data, it has a higher level of precision and can store bigger numbers. Now, what level of precision can you expect from either of these? FLOAT around 7 and DOUBLE around 15. Now, these data types are obnoxious because the exact values depend on your operating system and in general these monsters cannot be trusted. Especially when you start doing math with different numbers. In general, it is recommended to use the DOUBLE data type to have a higher level of precision and calculations in MySQL are done with DOUBLE. Always remember… prepare for trouble, make it double. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 8629 Caleb Curry
Oracle MONTHS_BETWEEN Function
 
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https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-months_between/ The Oracle MONTHS_BETWEEN function allows you to find the number of months between two dates. You can enter two dates and the function returns the difference. This function is often used as part of other calculations. Sometimes you’ll want to know the difference between two dates to perform other functions. The syntax of the MONTHS_BETWEEN function is: MONTHS_BETWEEN(date1, date2) What do these two parameters mean? The function performs date1 minus date2. So, if date1 is larger, the result is positive. If date2 is larger, then the result is negative. What data type is returned? It depends on the values you provide. If the dates are both on the same day of the month (e.g. both on the 10th of the month), then the result is an integer or whole number. If not, then the result will be a decimal value. For more information on the MONTHS_BETWEEN function, including the code used in this video and examples, read the related article here: https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-months_between/
Views: 1065 Database Star
Oracle SQL Tutorial 27 - CHAR Part 1
 
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This video and the next is going to cover CHAR and NCHAR. Be sure to check out the previous two videos as these are going to introduce you to some foundational knowledge required to understand these data types. CHAR is a fixed-length data type. What that means is that every value for a CHAR column is going to be the same length. You specify the length in parenthesis when you create the table. The thing you need to know though is that the default measurement is in bytes. That means if you specify the length to be CHAR(50), the length of each value will be 50 bytes, by default. If you want to change that to 50 characters, you can pass in the word CHAR as in CHAR(50 CHAR). This is known as a qualifier. Specifically, they are known as length semantics qualifiers (describes the meaning of the given length). Now, I said the default was bytes, but you can actually change the default to characters. In that situation, you can actually use the keyword BYTE to break away from the default. In general, it's best to put CHAR or BYTE even if it is the default. In general, it's best to keep things consistent. It's okay to have these measured in CHAR or BYTE, but it is recommended that every column is the same. It allows you to be more consistent as if some columns measure length in bytes and some measure length in characters, things can get confusing. If you do want to change the default, look up NLS_LENGTH_SEMANTICS as well as the potential problems it may bring. What values are allowed in parenthesis? That is what we are going to discuss in the next video. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 4983 Caleb Curry
Oracle LTRIM Function
 
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https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-trim/ The Oracle LTRIM function allows you to remove a specific character from the left side of a string. It’s one of the most commonly used string manipulation functions in SQL, in my experience. The “L” in “LTRIM” stands for “left”. It’s often used to remove spaces from the left of a string. However it can be used to remove other characters, such as leading characters from URLs. The syntax for the LTRIM function is: LTRIM(input_string, [trim_character]) The input_string is the text you want to remove characters from. It can be any kind of expression, such as a specific text value or a column. The trim_character is the character you want to remove from the left of the string. It’s an optional parameter, and if you don’t specify it, then a space character is used by the function. The parameters can be any type of string. The function will return either a VARCHAR2 or a LOB data type, depending on the type of data you specify in the parameters. You can specify more than one value for the trim_character, and the LTRIM function will remove both characters from the left of the string. The function is similar to the RTRIM value, where RTRIM removes characters from the right of the string. For more information on the LTRIM function, including the SQL used in this video, read the related article here: https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-trim/
Views: 128 Database Star
Oracle ADD_MONTHS Function
 
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https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-add_months/ The Oracle ADD_MONTHS allows you to add a specified number of months to a date value, and return the new date value. It’s great for performing calculations on dates, or date arithmetic, which can be hard in many different programming languages. The syntax of the ADD_MONTHS function is: ADD_MONTHS ( input_date, number_months ) The function returns a DATE value. The parameters of this function are: - input_date (mandatory): This is the starting date, or the date that you will add a number of months to. - number_months (mandatory): This is an integer value that represents the number of months to add to input_date. The input_date can be any datetime value, or even a character value that can be converted to a date. Also, the number_months can be any number value, or a character value that can be converted to a number. What if the number of days in the two months are different? For example, adding a month to Jan 31 could result in Feb 31, which does not exist. Well, in this case, Oracle would work out that the date does not exist, and use the last date of the month (e.g. Feb 28). You can also provide a negative value for ADD_MONTHS to subtract months from the specified date. For more information about the Oracle ADD_MONTHS function, including all of the SQL shown in this video and the examples, read the related article here: https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-add_months/
Views: 499 Database Star
Oracle GREATEST Function
 
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https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-greatest/ The Oracle GREATEST function is a useful function, but I don’t think it’s very well understood. It returns the greatest or largest value in a set of values. You can provide the values, and use numbers or text values. The syntax for the Oracle GREATEST function is: GREATEST(expr1 [, expr_n]) The expr1 is the first expression to use for your comparison. Expr_n is one or more expressions to use in the comparison, separated by commas. This is optional. So how is GREATEST calculated? If the parameters are numeric, the GREATEST function finds the largest number. If the parameters are characters, the function finds the latest value if they were sorted alphabetically (using their character values). What data type is returned? It depends on the parameters you provide. It could be the same as the parameters you provide, or VARCHAR2 if the parameters are all characters. You can also use the GREATEST function with dates. It’s also the opposite of the LEAST function. For more information on the GREATEST function, including the SQL used in this video and the examples, read the related post here: https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-greatest/
Views: 314 Database Star
Oracle SQL Tutorial 28 - CHAR Part 2
 
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Now this video is a continuation of the last video. I decided to break the video up into sections so they didn't cover so much information and drag on for 10 minutes. This video we are going to talk about the length of CHAR. Now it is important to remember that CHAR is a fixed-length data type. This means that every row's value for this column is going to have the same length. The length is given to the database by specifying the length in parenthesis, such as CHAR(10). If you give a value shorter than that, it will be padded with spaces. What range is allowed though? The lowest is actually one. The highest is 2000. Now, remember that Oracle allows either the specification of CHAR or BYTE. The limit of 2000 is actually 2000 bytes. What happens if you put 2000 CHAR? Well, Oracle actually lets you do that. What is the problem with this though? The problem is that not all characters are 1 byte. This means that our 2000 CHAR is inaccurate. This will only work with 1 byte characters. This might not seem like a big problem, but it can lead to runtime errors in code that uses our database. A runtime error is when our code runs and in certain circumstances we get an error and others we do not. If we allow a user to insert up to 2000 characters, but they decide to use multibyte characters such as Chinese, we will get an error. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 4021 Caleb Curry
MySQL 31 - DECIMAL Data Type
 
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The DECIMAL data type is similar to the INT data type in that when you use the number for math, it maintains precision. The difference though is obvious in the name. The DECIMAL data type allows for numbers after a decimal point (and before the decimal point). The DECIMAL data type allows us to store what is known as a fixed-point number. A fixed point number is a number that has a specific number of digits available to store numbers in. That means we can't do things like use a DECIMAL data type to store as many digits of PI as possible, because we can't store unlimited digits. We are limited to a certain number. There are two keywords you need to understand when you are working with the DECIMAL data type, precision and scale. Precision is the number of digits and scale is the number of those digits that will come after the radix. You are going to want to provide these numbers when you declare a column of this data type. For example, DECIMAL(5, 2) has a precision of 5 digits and a scale of 2 digits. That means we can store a maximum of two digits after the decimal and four digits total. This gives us a possible range from -999.99 to 999.99 The highest number of digits is 65, and the highest number of digits after the decimal is 30. This data type is also known as DEC, NUMERIC, and FIXED. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 8711 Caleb Curry
SQL 033 Data Types, Character String Data, VARCHAR
 
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Explains the SQL VARCHAR or variable length character data type. From http://ComputerBasedTrainingInc.com SQL Course. Learn by doing SQL commands for ANSI Standard SQL, Access, DB2, MySQL, Oracle, PostgreSQL, and SQL Server.
Views: 2214 cbtinc
Oracle SQL Tutorial 11 - CREATE TABLE
 
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The way you create a table is to use the CREATE TABLE command. CREATE TABLE users() So in this situation, the name comes right after the TABLE keyword. The next thing we do is put all of the columns on a line that we want to put in our table. CREATE TABLE users( user_id, username, first_name, last_name ) Notice the naming conventions here. For this series we are going to make columns with what is known as snake casing. This is where each individual word is separated by an underscore. if you have more than one column, all of them have to have commas except the last one. The comma is a way to say that another column is coming, so you don't need to do it on the last one. Now you would think we were done, but we also have to say what data type each column is. Later we will extensively discuss data types so we can focus on them exclusively. For now, here are the data types we are going to use: CREATE TABLE users( user_id NUMBER, username VARCHAR2(50), first_name VARCHAR2(50), last_name VARCHAR2(50) ) Now, inside of the parenthesis for varchar2, we pass in a number... This is the max length of the string. But the question is, what is it measured in? The default is actually in bytes, not characters. For example if we have the string hello, it is 5 characters, but it might take up a total of 10 bytes of storage. So I would recommend adding the keyword char right after the number so it defaults to 50 characters, not bytes. CREATE TABLE users( user_id NUMBER, username VARCHAR(50 CHAR), first_name VARCHAR2(50 CHAR), last_name VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) ) This will work to create a table, but it's really missing a lot of information… which column is the primary key? Are we adding any indexes? Is there any thing else we need to say about these columns? So as you can tell, we are making progress, but there is still so much to learn. The biggest gotcha to remember from this video is that the data type VARCHAR ends in a 2, stupid, right? who would end the name of something with a 2? Once again, this is Caleb from CalebTheVideoMaker2, and we will catch you in the next one! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ HELP ME! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 38582 Caleb Curry
ORACLE 12c New Features: Mở rộng kiểu VARCHAR2 lên 32,767 bytes, ko còn lo thiếu chổ nửa!
 
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New feature 12c: Extend to VARCHAR2() 32k, instead of 4000 bytes.
Views: 5377 1Click2beDBA
ORDER BY Clause in Oracle | Oracle Tutorials for Beginners
 
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Oracle Tutorials for Beginners ORDER BY Clause In Oracle ORDER BY Clause in SQL Oracle Tutorials for Beginners Oracle SQL Introduction #Oracle Tutorisla for Beginners Oracle for Beginners Oracle plsql tutorial for Beginners Oracle plsql tutorial for Beginners Oracle plsql tutorial for Beginners ORDER BY in Oracle SQL ORDER BY in Oracle SQL ORDER BY in Oracle SQL NULLS FIRST in Oracle NULLS FIRST in Oracle NULLS LAST in Oracle NULLS LAST in Order by Clause how order by clause works in oracle oracle order by date oracle sort varchar2 alphabetically oracle order by case multiple columns oracle sql order by specific values order by in oracle w3schools sql order by multiple columns oracle order by column not in select order by in oracle w3schools oracle order by multiple columns oracle sql order by specific values how order by clause works in oracle oracle order by date oracle order by group by sql order by alphabetical order by sql
Views: 599 Oracle PL/SQL World
MySQL 25 - CHAR Data Type
 
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The first category of data types that we are going to cover in this MySQL series are the string data types, or character data types. There are two that I am going to talk about in this video, CHAR and VARCHAR. We'll start with CHAR. CHAR is a string data type where you specify how many characters are allowed in parenthesis after you declare the column as this type. For example, we can say CHAR(50) to allow up to 50 characters for each value in that column. The thing to know about CHAR though is that it is a fixed-length string. That means every single value inside of that column is actually going to be whatever you declare the length as. So if you say CHAR(50), every string is going to be 50 characters long. If, for example, you have a row that only uses 40 characters, MySQL will pad the right side of the string with spaces until it fills 50 characters. Now, the highest value you can put in here is 255. The 255 refers to characters. This means that you can have strings with up to 255 characters. How does the computer know how to store these characters? That has to deal with the character set and the encoding of the characters. By default, MySQL is going to use UTF-8. We are not going to discuss UTF-8 in detail for a while but essentially UTF-8 says that each character can take up to 3 bytes of storage. 255 comes from the max number you can count to using binary. So if we are keeping track of how many values are in this column in an 8 bit number, 255 is the highest. If you don't know what I'm talking about it, we'll worry about it later. You can actually make the column CHAR(0). In this situation, the only thing you could put in as a value for this column is an empty string (''). When retrieving variable length CHAR data from a database it may not look like the database pads the value. That's because MySQL actually strips spaces from the value when presented. If you want to keep all of the spaces that have been added when you retrieve the value, you can do that. Look up PAD_CHAR_TO_FULL_LENGTH online. In the next video we are going to discuss VARCHAR. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 5044 Caleb Curry
MySQL Data Types 1 - Char and Varchar
 
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Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. Videos Available for Download - http://www.udemy.com/calebthevideomaker2-database-and-mysql-classes/ Playlist - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krx-w9icrkU&list=PL405B31DD586979DE Welcome to your very first video in this series, MySQL Datatypes! Please subscribe and like my videos, it means a TON to me. Thanks :) This is simply a small course to introduce you to all of the datatypes(excluding spatial, which I will not be covering in this course). All of the datatypes are broken into 4 sections, these are Numeric, Date and Time, String, and Spatial. In all, these are the datatypes I will be covering: tinyint, smallint, mediumint, int, bigint, decimal, float, double, real, bit, boolean, serial, date, datetime, timestamp, time, year, char, varchar, tinytext, text, mediumtext, longtext, binary, varbinary, tinyblob, mediumblob, blob, longblob, enum, and set. Wooah that's a lot. haha. I will not be going over geometry, point, linestring, polygon, multipoint, or multilinestring. If you want to learn more about Spatial types, start here: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/mysql-spatial-datatypes.html Want more information about what is covered in these videos? Always be sure to read the supporting page in the MySQL manual. http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/index.html Video information: Char and Varchar ___________________________ Char has a character range from 0 up to 255, varchar allows up to 65535. a max length can be specified in parenthesis such as char(40). char is right padded to fit the specified amount of characters, and the spaces are then removed on retrieval. Only trailing spaces will be removed. for example. Cat_hat__ will come out as cat_hat. This can be a bad thing if you need to store spaces. you will need to use varchar instead. If a value entered is too long, it will be "truncated," or cut to length. Extra info ________ a character set is an allowed range of characters that are entered into an entry. such as UTF-8. Utf 8 is 3 bytes for every character. the storing information for varchar and char are like this.. char - string length. varchar - string length+1. A 10 character entry using UTF-8 would then take 30 bytes in char, and 31 bytes in varchar, but if only 5 characters are entered, it will be 30 bytes for char, and 16 for varchar. This is because char stores the trailing spaces till the requested size is full (in this case 10). A table maximum row size is 65535, so this means if you have a varchar 65535 that is completely full in one column, that is the max allowed stored across that column. Any corrections needing made in these videos please message me. Thank you! More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://Twitter.com/calebCurry Subscribe (it's free!): http://bit.ly/PqPyvH Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 15039 Caleb Curry
Oracle SQL Generate Random Alphanumeric String
 
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In this video, you’ll learn how to generate random alphanumeric characters in an SQL statement in Oracle SQL You can use Oracle SQL to generate random alphanumeric string values by using one of the built-in functions. This function allows you to specify the type of string to generate - upper or lowercase alpha characters only, mixed alpha characters, uppercase alphanumeric characters, or any printable characters. You can also specify the length of the string to generate, This can be a fixed number, or you can use another function to generate a random number to use for the length! You’ll see some examples of generating random alphanumeric string values in this video. For more information and tips on Oracle SQL, check out DatabaseStar.com: https://www.databasestar.com/
Views: 523 Database Star
Oracle SQL Tutorial 26 - UTF-8 and UTF-16
 
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UTF-8 and UTF-16 are different encodings for the Unicode character set. Let's discuss UTF-8 first. UTF-8 is what is known as a variable-length character set. This means that the amount of storage a character takes up depends on what character it is. For example, if we store the character A, it will only take up one byte. In fact, ASCII is a subset of UTF-8. That means UTF-8 encoding can work with ASCII data. If you are new to computer storage, a byte is a very small amount of information. The smallest thing a computer can store is a bit. 1 or 0. On or off. There are 8 bits in a byte, 1024 bytes in a kilobyte, 1024 kilobytes in a megabyte, 1024 megabytes in a gigabyte, and 1024 gigabytes in a terabyte, and 1024 terabytes in a petabyte. Considering it is completely possible for a database to be multiple petabytes, you can understand that a byte is very small. If you store a non-English character, the size of UTF-8 will increase to 2, 3, or 4 bytes. If you think back to when we used the VARCHAR data type, we passed in 50 CHAR. The reason we throw in that CHAR is that the default for Oracle is 50 characters. Now you can understand why adding the CHAR might be important. If a character can take up multiple bytes, you cannot guarantee 50 characters. Now, on to UTF-16. UTF-16 is also a variable length encoding, but it differs in that It is either 2 or 4 bytes. That means to store an A, it now takes two bytes rather than one. Even though a byte is so small, when you are storing billions of characters, an unnecessary byte really adds up to a lot of wasted storage. We can only represent so many characters with 2 bytes. When we run out of options, we move to four bytes to allow for other characters. Which do we use? It often depends on what platform you are on and also what languages you are working with. For example, if you are working with Asian language, UTF-16 stores each character in 2 bytes while UTF-8 stores each character in 3 bytes. So you could save space by using UTF-16. Additionally, UTF-16 works better when you are writing code in Java or something from Microsoft .NET because UTF-16, or a subset of it called UCS-2, is widely adopted. Other than that, UTF-8 will be the one you want. Now that we have built a pretty good foundation of character sets, we can now continue our discussion of data types. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 8745 Caleb Curry
Oracle UPPER Function
 
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https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-upper-lower/ The Oracle UPPER function is used to convert a string to an uppercase value. It capitalises a string value. It’s useful for comparing text or string values that may have mixed case, such as user input or data from different tables. The opposite of the UPPER function is the LOWER function (which converts to lower case). The syntax of UPPER is: UPPER(input_string) The input_string is the string value to convert to an upper case value. It can be any of CHAR, VARCHAR2, NCHAR, NVARCHAR2, CLOB, or NCLOB. The return type is the same as the input type. You can use the UPPER function in a WHERE clause. However, unless you have a function-based index on the column, any indexes won’t be used. For example, if you have an index on first_name, a query that uses “WHERE UPPER(first_name)” won’t use this index. You’ll have to create an index on the UPPER(first_name) for this to be used. It’s not required, but it’s just something to keep in mind. For more information about the Oracle UPPER function, including all of the SQL shown in this video and the examples, read the related article here: https://www.databasestar.com/oracle-upper-lower/
Views: 165 Database Star
Difference between char,nchar,varchar,nvarchar in SqlServer
 
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Compleate diffrence between char,nchar,varchar,nvarchar in SqlServer
Views: 16180 Tech mohan
how to count length of field or data in sql server
 
08:31
with full hd for sql programming language
Views: 959 Sourn Sarim
SQL LEN() | LENGTH() Function
 
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The SQL LEN() function returns the length of the value of a given input string or in a table field.
Views: 422 suresh babu
MySQL 33 - Datetime, Date, Time Data Types
 
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Next up on our MySQL to-do list is to learn about storing dates and times. There are various data types in MySQL for storing dates and times. It seems MySQL and databases likes to break everything up into multiple data types to make things more organized at the consequence of being confusing and annoying. This video is going to be talking about the DATETIME, DATE, and TIME data types. These are all used to store, you guessed it, dates and times. The one you choose depends on your needs. If you just need dates, choose DATE. If you just need times, choose TIME, if you need both stored together, choose DATETIME. Now you set a column one of these data types whenever you want every row for this field to have some sort of date, time or both…but how exactly is the data formatted? This requires us to understand some convention. For example, in the USA at least, if you have something like 4:30AM, by convention you know the hour is 4 and the minutes are 30. But this is just an agreed upon convention. MySQL has its own convention…For example 2017-02-02. The first thing is the year, the second is the month, and the third is the day. That is for the DATE. The convention for time is 22:54:30. The first is the hour (military time), the second is the minute, and the third is the seconds. Lastly, there can actually be fractions of seconds…up to microseconds! .123456. To use fractional seconds though you must specify to MySQL the precision of the TIME or DATETIME when you create it, for example DATETIME(6) would allow microsecond precision. How do you actually give a date to MySQL? By that I mean let's say you have a table with a column of DATETIME(6), and you want to give a value for that column, how do you format it? It's quoted. For example: '2017-02-02 22:54:30.333333' MySQL interprets this as a DATETIME. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 38676 Caleb Curry
Oracle SQL Tutorial 31 - NCHAR Part 2
 
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This video is going to be part 2 of NCHAR. That's because I have a bit more things to say about it before we move on to other data types. The first thing I wanted to mention is that if you declare an NCHAR(50), it is going to always be 50 characters. You do not need to use the CHAR or BYTE keyword in parenthesis to specify which you would like. We've said that NCHAR uses Unicode, but as we've learned in the last video, there are many character sets that use Unicode. Which character set is NCHAR going to use? That decision is based off of what your database's national character set is. So for every database you can declare a database character set and you can declare a national character set. The national character set is what is used for this data type. There are two options for the national character set, AL16UTF16, and UTF8. The default is AL16UTF16, which uses the utf-16 encoding. The Oracle docs has a lot of pros and cons for each one, but in general the defaults are default for a reason, so AL16UTF16 usually works fine. Now, a few videos ago I made a comment about the CHAR and NCHAR data types and how they might not be recommended. Why so? The reason is that CHAR is secretly just a VARCHAR2 that is padded to take up a full length. It does not save space nor improve performance in the database, so the chances are you are never going to want to use it. That being said, everything you've learned has not been a waste because a lot can be applied to the VARCHAR2 and NVARCHAR2 data types. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 3998 Caleb Curry
HOW TO CREATE TABLE IN ORACLE
 
07:40
In this video we will see how to create table in oracle also PFB syntax and create table statement used in this video --CREATE TABLE SYNTAX CREATE TABLE TABLE_NAME ( COL1_NAME DATA_TYPE (LENGTH), COL2_NAME DATA_TYPE (LENGTH), COL3_NAME DATA_TYPE (LENGTH) ) ; CREATE TABLE STUDENT ( SNAME VARCHAR2(20), SROLLNO NUMBER(4,0), SCLASS VARCHAR2(20) );
Views: 68 DWBIADDA VIDEOS
Every VARCHAR2(N) Declaration a Bug!? (HC-4)
 
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That's right. VARCHAR2 declarations mean that you have to provide an "N" or constraint on the size of the variable. If you have such declarations all over your code, that's a form of hard-coding and you are likely to get hammered by VALUE_ERROR exceptions. This video shows you how to fix this problem, focusing in on the very helpful SUBTYPE feature of PL/SQL. ============================ Practically Perfect PL/SQL with Steven Feuerstein Copyright © 2015 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Other names may be registered trademarks of their respective owners. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the “Materials”). The Materials are provided “as is” without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties or merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Why is varchar(max) getting truncated?
 
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Have you ever tried to fit more than 8000 characters into a variable defined as varchar(max) (or nvarchar(max)) only to see your data get truncated? Today we explore why this happens and how to fix it, allowing you to create really long SQL strings. Related blog post with example code: https://bertwagner.com/2018/05/15/why-is-my-varcharmax-variable-getting-truncated/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/bertwagner Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bertwagner/ https://www.instagram.com/sqlwithbert/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SQLWithBert
Views: 512 Bert Wagner
Oracle Part 6 Primary Key
 
24:45
Primary key, varchar, length, trim, order by clause
Views: 1130 Free OpenMentor
Oracle 12C New Feature DDL Logging
 
05:41
oracle 12c new features How to enable DDL Logging in oracle? oracle 12c new features for developers
Views: 255 Siva Academy
Find Special Character in a string using Sql
 
01:10
In this video we learn how to find the special character , number in a string using sql server. -- How to Find Number and character in a string SELECT Employeeid,LastName FROM Employees WHERE LastName like '%[^0-9A-Z]%' -- How to find Special Character in a string SELECT Employeeid,LastName FROM Employees WHERE LastName like '%[@,#,$,%,*]%' -- How to find number in a string SELECT Employeeid,LastName FROM Employees WHERE LastName like '%[0-9]%'
Views: 2343 SmartCode
MySQL 27 - TEXT, TINYTEXT, MEDIUMTEXT, LONGTEXT
 
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The TEXT data types have not yet been discussed, but they are another string data type. They are similar to the VARCHAR data type with some minor differences that are important to know. The first thing to note is that there are four versions used to determine different sizes. From least to greatest size is TINYTEXT, TEXT, MEDIUMTEXT, LARGETEXT. These each have different maximum byte sizes: 255, 65535, 16 million something, and 4 billion something. You create a column as one of these data types just as you would with a varchar column. You work with them exactly the same, too. If that is the case, what are the primary differences between these and VARCHAR? The first difference is that VARCHAR is restricted by the row limit of a table. TEXT tables do not contribute nearly as much (max of 12 bytes) because the data is not stored inline in the table. This means that if you need to allow for extra space for other rows, you can use a TEXT column. And even though the table only contains a pointer to the data, it is all hidden to us and working with a TEXT column is the same as working with a VARCHAR column. The second primary difference is that TEXT data types do not allow for a default other than NULL. Thirdly, VARCHAR is limited to just under 64KB, whereas you can use MEDIUMTEXT or LARGETEXT to allow for more storage. So if what you are trying to store as an individual value is over 64KB, use a text column. Other than those three things, VARCHAR will usually work just fine for our text needs. Now, last thing is that these data types are often called CLOB data types. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 6008 Caleb Curry
PART-2 (Oracle Functions) Oracle PL SQL Training - Fast Track Series
 
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Topic 2: Functions in PL SQL. In oracle there are two types of functions available. 1. Oracle Supplied Function (Built in Functions) Scaler Functions a) String Functions Length, instr, substr, rtrim, ltrim, lower, upper, concat, replace sqlplus sanket/patel SQL*Plus: Release 11.2.0.2.0 Production on Tue Feb 14 11:38:56 2017 Copyright (c) 1982, 2010, Oracle. All rights reserved. Connected to: Oracle Database 11g Express Edition Release 11.2.0.2.0 - Production SQL# SQL# select length('sanket') from dual; LENGTH('SANKET') ---------------- 6 SQL# select instr('sanket','n') from dual; INSTR('SANKET','N') ------------------- 3 SQL# select substr('sanket',1,3) from dual; SUB --- san SQL# select ltrim(' sanket ') from dual; LTRIM('S -------- sanket SQL# select rtrim(' sanket ') from dual; RTRIM('S -------- sanket SQL# select trim(' sanket ') from dual; TRIM(' ------ sanket SQL# select lower('SanKet') from dual; LOWER( ------ sanket SQL# select upper('SanKet') from dual; UPPER( ------ SANKET SQL# select concat('sanket','patel') from dual; CONCAT('SAN ----------- sanketpatel SQL# SQL# select replace('patel','e','i') from dual; REPLA ----- patil SQL# b) Date Functions Sysdate, add_months, extract, last_day, next_day, months_between c) Numeric Functions Trunc, ceil, round d) Oracle Type Cast or Conversion Functions To_char, to_date, to_number e) Null functions Nvl, Nvl2 Aggregate Functions Count,min,max,sum 2. User Defined Functions (PL SQL) CREATE [OR REPLACE] FUNCTION function_name [ (parameter [,parameter]) ] RETURN return_datatype IS | AS [declaration_section] BEGIN executable_section [EXCEPTION exception_section] END [function_name]; Characteristics of Functions • Function must returns some value • Function can be called from select statement • Function support all three types of parameters available in oracle like IN, OUT and IN OUT parameters. Types of Parameters: IN Parameter: We can’t overwrite value of such kind of parameters. It is used to pass reference values to program and utilized it within the programs or sub-programs or other standalone programs. OUT Parameter: We can overwrite value of such kind of parameters. It is not useful to pass reference values to program and utilized it within the programs or sub-programs or other standalone programs but output value must need to be hold by calling program. IN OUT Parameter: We can overwrite value as well as pass reference value to program or sub-programs or other standalone programs but output value must need to be hold by calling program. EXAMPLES: --FUNCTION WITH OUT PARAMETER CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION GET_DATE_HH24TIME RETURN VARCHAR2 IS HH24DATE_TIME VARCHAR2(20); BEGIN HH24DATE_TIME := TO_CHAR(SYSDATE,'DD/MM/YYYY HH24:MI:SS'); RETURN HH24DATE_TIME; END; / --FUNCTION WITH PARAMETER CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION GET_P_DATE_HH24TIME (P_HH24DATE_TIME IN DATE) RETURN VARCHAR2 IS HH24DATE_TIME VARCHAR2(20); BEGIN HH24DATE_TIME := TO_CHAR(P_HH24DATE_TIME,'DD/MM/YYYY HH24:MI:SS'); RETURN HH24DATE_TIME; END; / SELECT GET_P_DATE_HH24TIME(SYSDATE) FROM DUAL; Drop Functions: We can drop function from the database. DROP FUNCTION GET_P_DATE_HH24TIME; SQL# SELECT OBJECT_NAME FROM USER_OBJECTS WHERE OBJECT_TYPE = 'FUNCTION'; OBJECT_NAME --------------------------------------------------------------------------GET_DATE_HH24TIME GET_P_DATE_HH24TIME DROP FUNCTION GET_DATE_HH24TIME;
Views: 4726 Sanket Patel
About that error: ORA-06502: numeric or value error
 
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"ORA-06502: numeric or value error" is one of the most commonly occurring and irritating errors for PL/SQL developers. Value too big for its "container"? Trying to stuff a non-numeric string value into a number through implicit conversion? [naughty naughty] In this video, Steven takes a close look at ORA-06502, exploring the ways it can be raised and how best to deal with those scenarios. ============================ Practically Perfect PL/SQL with Steven Feuerstein Copyright © 2015 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Other names may be registered trademarks of their respective owners. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the “Materials”). The Materials are provided “as is” without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties or merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
88. MID and LENGTH Function in SQL (Hindi)
 
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Please Subscribe Channel Like, Share and Comment Visit : www.geekyshows.com
Views: 6325 Geeky Shows
SQL 032 Data Types, Character String Data, CHAR or CHARACTER
 
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Explains the SQL CHAR or CHARACTER data type. From http://ComputerBasedTrainingInc.com SQL Course. Learn by doing SQL commands for ANSI Standard SQL, Access, DB2, MySQL, Oracle, PostgreSQL, and SQL Server.
Views: 527 cbtinc
Administration de base de données Oracle - 6 -  L'opérateur BETWEEN
 
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Découvrons dans cette vidéo la clause BETWEEN...
Views: 6869 LES TEACHERS DU NET
how to create database ,table  with primary key and auto increment in phpmyadmin
 
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This video explain how to create database and table and primary and auto increment in phpmyadmin
Views: 60100 expert programming

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