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The shrinking of the Aral Sea -  "One of the planet's worst environmental disasters"
 
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The shrinking of the Aral Sea has been called "one of the planet's worst environmental disasters". The region's once prosperous fishing industry has been essentially destroyed, bringing unemployment and economic hardship. The Aral Sea region is also heavily polluted, with consequent serious public health problems. The retreat of the sea has reportedly also caused local climate change, with summers becoming hotter and drier, and winters colder and longer. Put together for the MSc in Environmental Technology.
Views: 345761 NV atCEPImperial
Aral Sea: Man-made environmental disaster - BBC News
 
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Subscribe to BBC News www.youtube.com/bbcnews It took just 40 years for the Aral Sea to dry up. Fishing ports suddenly found themselves in a desert. But in one small part of the sea, water is returning. Latest satellite pictures reveal that 90% of the Aral Sea has dried up, forming a new desert between Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan in Central Asia. It's a man-made environmental disaster. As part of the BBC's Richer World Season, Rustam Qobil visits the Aral Sea, a toxic desert sea bed, and talks to people who have lost their sea, health and loved ones. Subscribe to BBC News HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog Check out our website: http://www.bbc.com/news Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bbcworldnews Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bbcworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/bbcnews
Views: 172944 BBC News
the shrinking Aral Sea
 
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an animation of the shrinking of the aral-sea (uzbekistan & kazakhstan) in the period of 1960 till now, caused by irrigation for the cotton monoculture and rendering central asia an area of environmental disaster, health problems and political instability. Also see the documentary on youtube, Delta Blues: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0465vGRWhQE
Views: 88326 mirrormundo
Aral Sea - sandstorms and the fight against desertification | Tomorrow Today
 
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The Aral Sea was once the world's fourth largest lake. But for decades the rivers that feed it have been diverted for irrigation. As a result, the huge body of water between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan has steadily shrunk and is now only 10 percent of its original volume. What remains is a desert of sand, salt and toxic dust containing pesticides, fertilizers and industrial chemicals.Sandstorms carry the dust to surrounding regions, causing widespread desertification and health problems for the local population. Scientists are searching for ways to halt this environmental catastrophe.
Views: 2498 DW News
Aral Sea the life and Death on Google Earth Map
 
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info from:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aral_Sea The Aral Sea (Kazakh: Арал Теңізі Aral Teñizi; Uzbek: Orol Dengizi; Russian: Ара́льское море, tr. Aral'skoye Morye; IPA: [ɐˈralʲskəjə ˈmorʲɪ]; Tajik: Баҳри Арал Bahri Aral; older Persian: دریای خوارزم‎ Daryâ-ye Khârazm) was an endorheic lake lying between Kazakhstan (Aktobe and Kyzylorda provinces) in the north and Uzbekistan (Karakalpakstan autonomous region) in the south. The name roughly translates as "Sea of Islands", referring to over 1,100 islands that once dotted its waters; in Old Turkic aral means "island".[3] The Aral Sea drainage basin encompasses Uzbekistan and parts of Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan.[4] Formerly one of the four largest lakes in the world with an area of 68,000 km2 (26,300 sq mi), the Aral Sea has been steadily shrinking since the 1960s after the rivers that fed it were diverted by Soviet irrigation projects. By 2007, it had declined to 10% of its original size, splitting into four lakes – the North Aral Sea, the eastern and western basins of the once far larger South Aral Sea, and one smaller lake between the North and South Aral Seas.[5] By 2009, the southeastern lake had disappeared and the southwestern lake had retreated to a thin strip at the extreme west of the former southern sea; in subsequent years, occasional water flows have led to the southeastern lake sometimes being replenished to a small degree.[6] Satellite images taken by NASA in August 2014 revealed that for the first time in modern history the eastern basin of the Aral Sea had completely dried up.[7] The eastern basin is now called the Aralkum desert. In an ongoing effort in Kazakhstan to save and replenish the North Aral Sea, a dam project was completed in 2005; in 2008, the water level in this lake had risen by 12 m (39 ft) compared to 2003. Salinity has dropped, and fish are again found in sufficient numbers for some fishing to be viable.[8] The maximum depth of the North Aral Sea is 42 m (138 ft) (as of 2008).[1] The shrinking of the Aral Sea has been called "one of the planet's worst environmental disasters".[9] The region's once-prosperous fishing industry has been essentially destroyed, bringing unemployment and economic hardship. The Aral Sea region is also heavily polluted, with consequential serious public health problems.
Views: 1718 Adventure Story
Homework #1: Disparities of Health| Aral Sea Disaster
 
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This video displays the determinants of health using the aral sea tragedy and the film the hospital at the end of the world.
Views: 114 school account
Interesting The Shrinking of the Aral Sea Facts
 
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Views: 80 Health Apta
Dead Sea: From world wonder to sinkhole nightmare
 
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Once a tourist attraction and one of the world's first health resorts, the Dead Sea is receding at an alarming rate. Multiple canals and pipelines were proposed to reduce its recession. And though the dangers have been known for years, little has been done on the ground. Some say it could be too late. Let's get started with this report  by Maya Margit, on one of the major environmental problems caused by the decline of the Dead Sea - the creation of sinkholes. Filmed by Yevgeni Bronfermacher Edited by Nir Waxman
Views: 17969 i24NEWS English
The Aral Sea has shrunk in size by 90% in recent decades
 
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(7 Apr 2019) LEADIN: Once the fourth largest lake in the world, the Aral Sea has seen itself shrink to a slither of it's original size. All it left in it's trail was dry arid land, which the Uzbek government are now trying to transform into fertile planting terrain in order to stop desertification. STORYLINE: Rusted ships in the desert near the town of Moynaq are silent reminders of the fate of the Aral Sea. Once an important seaport, today Moynaq (Munak) is the victim of a manmade ecological catastrophe that took place here. People left when the lake started to disappear, causing economic and health issues. Now the city is dozens of kilometres from the shoreline of the the Aral Sea and just several thousand residents remain. Desert covers 80 percent of the country and is spreading each year, due to chronic drought. Once the world's fourth-largest lake, the sea has shrunk by at least 90 percent since the rivers that feed it were largely diverted in a Soviet project to boost cotton production in the arid region. The shrunken sea has ruined the once-robust fishing economy and left fishing trawlers stranded in sandy wastelands, leaning over as if they dropped from the air. The sea's evaporation has left layers of highly salted sand, which winds can carry as far away as Scandinavia and Japan, and which plague local people with health troubles. A new initiative to counteract the effects of the harmful program is being supported by the Uzbek government. Dean of the faculty of environment at Karakalpak State University, Yakub Amedov, is hoping that with the help of his students he can help to  change the landscape of the land in Moynaq. "Our main aim is to improve the environmental situation in the Moynaq region. President Shavkat Mirziyoyev supports any initiative of the development of the region. Now students of Karakalpak University are helping to plant the trees. Today we're planting plum, grapes, apple, apricot, cherry. In the future, we plan to make an educational site for students." he says. According to NASA, at the beginning of the 1960s, the Aral Sea received 50 cubic kilometres of fresh water from snowmelt and rainfall. In 1980 that number fell to zero. Since 1985 the Aral Sea has shrunk to a quarter of its original size. One of the ways to stop the desertification is intensive planting, according to Vadim Sokolov, head of the agency for implementation of the International Fund for Saving the Aral Sea. "One of the key ways to prevent the spreading of salt and chemicals that have accumulated from the Aral Sea is by tree planting and fixing the sand from the dried-up sea bed" Sokolov says. Sokolov notes that they have  managed to speed up the planting process hopefully setting the program at a faster pace. "More than 500,000 tonnes of seeds were collected in December (2018) and January (2019) and with the help of these seeds today, the middle of March, more than 500,000 hectares can be planted. In the past we were planting 5-10 thousand hectares, now in only three months we have planted 500,000 hectares. We plan to continue this work in the autumn and we plan to plant around a million hectares of the territory. Which is almost a third of the desert, which is on the dried up sea bed." Sokolov hopes to plant around a million hectares of the territory - that's one-third of the desert that once was a seabed. Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Archive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APArchives Google+: https://plus.google.com/b/102011028589719587178/+APArchive​ Tumblr: https://aparchives.tumblr.com/​​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/ You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d6fc8cf362beabfb23999e1a357e73b0
Views: 332 AP Archive
Interesting Aral Sea Facts
 
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Thanks For Watching Subscribe to become a part of #TeamHealthApta SUBSCRIBE for awesome videos every day!: LIKE us on FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/healthapta FOLLOW us on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/healthapta Want to live forever on the internet? Submit your video to us: Rate, Comment, Share... Thanx and Enjoy the videos.
Views: 3388 Health Apta
The Salton Sea Is Shrinking And Exposing Toxic Dust | AJ+ Docs
 
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Watch Our Latest Documentaries: http://ajplus.co/ajplusdocsnew California’s Salton Sea is disappearing, which could endanger wildlife and cause a public health disaster. Subscribe for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCV3Nm3T-XAgVhKH9jT0ViRg?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ajplusenglish Download the AJ+ app at http://www.ajplus.net/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajplus
Views: 261874 AJ+
Why millions of Americans could be drinking bad water - BBC News
 
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While Flint made headlines two years ago when 12 people died due to high lead levels in the city's water, more than 1,000 water systems across the US have drinking water that fails safety standards for lead. For the BBC's America First? series, the BBC's Aleem Maqbool is exploring health and social issues where the US, the richest country in the world, does not perform well in international rankings. Please subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog World In Pictures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS3XGZxi7cBX37n4R0UGJN-TLiQOm7ZTP Big Hitters https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS3XGZxi7cBUME-LUrFkDwFmiEc3jwMXP Just Good News https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS3XGZxi7cBUsYo_P26cjihXLN-k3w246
Views: 17087 BBC News
Full Documentary: "Aral. The lost sea" by Isabel Coixet | We Are Water Foundation
 
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The drying up of the Aral Sea is one of the greatest environmental disasters in history. Between 1954 and 1960, the government of the former Soviet Union ordered the construction of a 500 km-long canal that would take a third of the water from the Amu Darya River for an immense area of irrigated land in order to grow cotton in the region. The increasing need for water, due to bad transport management and a lack of foresight and efficiency in land irrigation, meant that more water had to be diverted from rivers flowing into the Aral Sea. As a result, in the eighties, the water reaching the port was as little as 10% of the amount in 1960, and the Aral Sea began to dry up. Consequently, the Aral Sea currently occupies half of its original surface area and its volume has decreased by a quarter, 95% of the nearby reservoirs and wetlands have become deserts and more than 50 lakes from deltas with a surface area of 60,000 hectares have dried up. In terms of climate, this process has eliminated the area’s environmental shock absorbing capacity, making winters and summers harsher, with a subsequent increase in severe droughts. The wind has displaced tons of the saline sand that was originally at the bottom of the dried-up area to a distance of up to 200 km, which has drastically exacerbated the situation. Added to this, fertilisers and pesticides were used indiscriminately, polluting the air and groundwater. The Soviet goal to have saline water at four times the limit recommended by the WHO reduced the groundwater level from 53 to 36 metres, which in turn caused serious problems with the supply of drinking water. The consequences for the health of the population have also been extremely serious. The region has the highest infant mortality rates in all of the former Soviet Union. Chronic bronchitis has increased by 3000% and arthritis by 6000%. In the Uzbek region of Karakalpakstan, anaemia is epidemic among women and 97% of them have haemoglobin levels lower than the 110 grams per litre of blood established by the WHO. Experts point out that this is caused by the consumption of stagnant water containing zinc and magnesium. In the same zone of Uzbekistan, liver cancer increased by 200% from 1981 to 1987, throat cancer by 25% and infant mortality by 20%. Also, cases of hepatitis, respiratory disease, eye-related illness and intestinal infection in the region are seven times higher than in 1960. All of this occurred in a relatively short period of time and the most shocking thing is that it happened with an almost total lack of international awareness. In 2003, satellite pictures from NASA demonstrated the full scale of the disaster and what many scientists had already announced. World opinion is now mobilising and we are beginning to find out the full extent of the current human disaster. In January 1994, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan signed an agreement pledging 1% of their budgets to contribute to the recovery of the sea; however, cooperation among these countries has been minimal. Currently, the northern zone of the Aral Sea is recovering slightly as a result of the construction of the Kokaral dam by the Kazak Government to retain water that would normally flow into Uzbek territorial waters. more information at www.wearewater.org
Top 10 Most Dangerous Places To Visit
 
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Top 10 Most Dangerous Places To Visit At number 10, The Korean Demilitarized zone One might think that a demilitarized zone would be a safe place to go, but it's otherwise. The word “demilitarized” is a bit misleading since it refers to a stretch of land between the borders of North Korea and South Korea, which could also be called a no-man’s-land. Within the 250-kilometer stretch of land, which is approximately 4 kilometers wide, there exists the largest accumulation of antipersonnel land mines on the planet. At number 9, Anthrax Islands, It refer to three sites used for hazardous biological disease testing. Gruinard, a Scottish island in the United Kingdom used in World War II Vozrozhdeniya, an island in the Aral Sea used by the Soviet Union in the Cold War Plum Island (New York), an island off Long Island, New York in the United States, the location of a testing lab for hazardous livestock diseases. At number 8, Picher, Oklahoma Picher is a ghost town and former city in Ottawa County, Oklahoma, United States. More than a century of unrestricted subsurface excavation dangerously undermined most of Picher's town buildings and left giant piles of toxic metal- contaminated mine tailings heaped throughout the area. It's a no man landzone now. At number 7, Gilman, Colorado Gilman is an abandoned mining town in southeastern Eagle County, Colorado, United States. Once a center of lead and zinc mining, was abandoned in 1984 by order of the Environmental Protection Agency because of toxic pollutants, including contamination of the ground water. Humans are prohibited. At number 6, Bikini Atoll known for the nuclear testing the United States conducted on it during the 1940s and 1950s, in which the indigenous population were removed. Left the islands contaminated with enough radioactivity to keep away humans. At number 5, Wittenoom, Australia Wittenoom is a ghost town 1,106 kilometres (687 mi) north-north-east of Perth of Western Australia. The town was shut down in 1966 due to unprofitability and growing health concerns from asbestos mining in the area. Today, three residents still live in the town as of 2018, which receives no government services. At number 4, Centralia, Pennsylvania Centralia is a borough and near-ghost town in Columbia County, Pennsylvania, United States. Its population has dwindled from more than 1,000 residents in 1980 to 63 by 1990, to only seven in 2013, a result of the coal mine fire which has been burning beneath the borough since 1962. The underground fire is still burning as of 2018 and may continue to do so for 250 years. At number 3, Aral Sea The Aral Sea was once a large lake between the borders of Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. But thanks to global climate change, the lake is ostensibly gone. The sea began shrinking, due to a Soviet plan in the 1960s, to reroute several of the rivers feeding it. But most of the water, has evaporated, thanks to the increase in global temperatures. called as “one of the planet’s worst environmental disasters. Now the eastern basin of the Aral Sea is now known as the Aralkum Desert ! At Number 2, Fukushima Exclusion Zone, Japan Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster was an energy accident at the Nuclear Power Plant, initiated primarily by the tsunami following the Tōhoku earthquake on 11 March 2011. Immediately after the tsunami disabled the emergency generators that would have provided power to control and operate the pumps necessary to cool the reactors. The insufficient cooling led to three nuclear meltdowns, hydrogen-air explosions, and the release of radioactive material. Investigations showed the man-made nature of the catastrophe and its roots in regulatory capture. Due to all the contamination, the area within 20 kilometers exclusion zone is currently off-limits. At number 1, Chernobyl Zone Of Alienation, Ukraine The worst nuclear disasters of all time occurred at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant explosion in 1986. Since the accident, an exclusion zone has been established extending 30 kilometers in all directions. The nuclear power plant site clean-up is scheduled for completion in 2065 and the land will not be fully safe for human habitation for many decades to come.
Views: 418 super topper
Most Dangerous Abandoned places In The World!!
 
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Description 1.Wittenoom,Western Australia Wittenoom is a ghost town 1,106 kilometres (687 mi) north-north-east of Perth in the Hamersley Range in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. The area around Wittenoom was mainly pastoral until the 1930s when mining began in the area. By 1939, major mining had begun in Yampire Gorge, which was subsequently closed in 1943 when mining began in Wittenoom Gorge. In 1947 a company town was built, and by the 1950s it was Pilbara's largest town. During the 1950s and early 1960s Wittenoom was Australia's only supplier of blue asbestos. The town was shut down in 1966 due to unprofitability and growing health concerns from asbestos mining in the area. Today, three[1] residents still live in the town, which receives no government services. In December 2006, the Government of Western Australia announced that the town's official status would be removed, and in June 2007, Jon Ford, the Minister for Regional Development, announced that the townsite had officially been degazetted. The town's name was removed from official maps and road signs and the Shire of Ashburton is able to close roads that lead to contaminated areas. The Wittenoom steering committee met in April 2013 to finalise closure of the town, limit access to the area and raise awareness of the risks. Details of how that would be achieved were to be determined but it would likely necessitate removing the town's remaining residents, converting freehold land to crown land, demolishing houses and closing or rerouting roads. By 2015 six residents remained; in 2016 the number had reduced to three. 2.Kantubek Uzbekistan Kantubek (Russian: Кантубек) was a town on Vozrozhdeniya Island (Uzbekistan) in the Aral Sea. The town is still found on maps, but is uninhabited and lies in ruins today. Kantubek used to have a population of approximately 1,500, and housed scientists and employees of the Soviet Union's top-secret Aralsk-7 biological weapons research and test site. Brian Hayes, a biochemical engineer with the United States Department of Defense's Threat Reduction Agency, led an expedition in the spring and summer of 2002 to neutralize what was believed to be the world's largest anthrax dumping grounds. His team of 113 people neutralized between 100 and 200 tonnes of anthrax over a three-month period. The cost of the cleanup operation was approximately US$5,000,000. 3.Love Canal,Niagara falls Love Canal is a neighborhood within Niagara Falls, New York. It is the site of a pollution disaster that extensively affected the health of hundreds of its residents, necessitating a Superfund cleanup operation. Originally intended in the 1890s as a planned model community, Love Canal grew and then slowly declined before being bought out in the 1940s by the Hooker Company, which dumped industrial waste in the never completed canal. In the late 1970s, Love Canal received national attention for the public health problem originating from the disposal of 22,000 barrels of toxic waste. Numerous families were displaced from their houses, which had been contaminated with chemicals and toxic waste. Many of the families suffered several health issues with common problems of high red blood cell counts and indications of leukemia. The entire neighborhood has since been demolished and a Superfund cleanup was only wrapped up in 2004. New York State Health Department Commissioner David Axelrod calls the Love Canal incident a "national symbol of a failure to exercise a sense of concern for future generations".[1] The Love Canal incident was especially significant as a situation where the inhabitants "overflowed into the wastes instead of the other way around. 4,Picher, Oklahoma Picher is a ghost town and former city in Ottawa County, Oklahoma, United States. This was a major national center of lead and zinc mining at the heart of the Tri-State Mining District. More than a century of unrestricted subsurface excavation dangerously undermined most of Picher's town buildings and left giant piles of toxic metal-contaminated mine tailings (known as chat) heaped throughout the area. The discovery of the cave-in risks, groundwater contamination, and health effects associated with the chat piles and subsurface shafts resulted in the site being included in 1980 in the Tar Creek Superfund Site by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The state collaborated on mitigation and remediation measures, but a 1996 study found that 34% of the children in Picher suffered from lead poisoning due to these environmental effects, which could result in lifelong neurological problems.[4] Eventually the EPA and the state of Oklahoma agreed to a mandatory evacuation and buyout of the entire township. The similarly contaminated satellite towns of Treece, Kansas and Cardin, Oklahoma were included in the Tar Creek Superfund site.
Views: 3938 SMART HUB
Largest CA Lake is Disappearing
 
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The Salton Sea is the site of one of the largest man-made environmental disasters in the western United States yet most of us haven't heard of it. The thing is, we can fix it. My Camera Kit: http://bit.ly/TedWillisKit ***CORRECTION: *The Sea is NOT "Completely Toxic". Millions of healthy animals live in it and depend on it, people also fish & swim. It is Class A Rec 1 water for boating and fishing. There are heavy-metal toxins in the sediment that become detrimental if they are airborne. This is the biggest reason we need to keep it wet. The Sea is very much alive and the algaes consume the extra nutrients, which pulls oxygen out of the water, occasionally causing fish die offs. *The Sea is not a complete accident; it has filled and dried over the millennia, and would have likely been here if we hadn't farmed, diked and moved the water over and over. It was once connected to the Gulf of California, and since then has even been a much larger freshwater lake, Lake Cahuilla. Ancestors of the same tribes that live here now fished on its ancient shores. *The $9 Billion dollar plan was a dyke halfway across the Sea and that plan was shut down to too many problems for how expensive it was. To build a pipeline from the Gulf of California, construction will cost about $1 Billion dollars, as well as a seawater purchase agreement through Mexico and the Cucapa Tribe. This would not come close to $9 Billion for only import. * Spelling - "The EcoMedia Compass, instead of Eco Media Compass * Spelling - Cynthia Portillo Behind the Scenes: https://youtu.be/Ck9ovtdhPnw Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKsQU2dMpeP5nY6VzxKE6RQ?sub_confirmation=1 Website: http://www.trekt.net/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/trekttv/ Follow these guys Dadsocks - www.instagram.com/dadsocks/ EcoMedia Compass - www.instagram.com/ecomediacompass/ Music: Mussart - Olan Mill Somimes - Olan Mill Novnal - Olan Mill olanmill.bandcamp.com Something New in All Sizes and Colors - Underground Citiesundergroundcities.bandcamp.com Transcription: Ted Willis, Jim Crowell Salton Sea Aerial Footage Provided by EcoMedia Compass Interviewees: Linda Lemus, Kerry Morrison, Cynthia Portillo, Don Stephens Special Thanks to Giovanni Arechavaleta and EcoMedia Compass
Views: 239910 Ted Willis
Lake Became Desert Within Thirty Years..
 
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The Aral Sea is situated in Central Asia, between the Southern part of Kazakhstan and Northern Uzbekistan. Up until the third quarter of the 20th century it was the world?s fourth largest saline lake, and contained 10grams of salt per liter. The two rivers that feed it are the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers, respectively reaching the Sea through the South and the North. The Soviet government decided in the 1960s to divert those rivers so that they could irrigate the desert region surrounding the Sea in order to favor agriculture rather than supply the Aral Sea basin. The reason why we decided to explore the implications up to today of this human alteration of the environment is precisely that certain characteristics of the region, from its geography to its population growth, account for dramatic consequences since the canals have been dug. Those consequences range from unexpected climate feedbacks to public health issues, affecting the lives of millions of people in and out of the region. By establishing a program to promote agriculture and especially that of cotton, Soviet government led by Khrouchtchev in the 1950s deliberately deprived the Aral Sea of its two main sources of water income, which almost immediately led to less water arriving to the sea. Not only was all this water being diverted into canals at the expense of the Aral Sea supply, but the majority of it was being soaked up by the desert and blatantly wasted (between 25% and 75% of it, depending on the time period). The water level in the Aral Sea started drastically decreasing from the 1960s onward. In normal conditions, the Aral Sea gets approximately one fifth of its water supply through rainfall, while the rest is delivered to it by the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers. Evaporation causes the water level to decrease by the same amount that flows into the Sea, making it sustainable as long as inflow is equal to evaporation on average. Therefore the diversion of rivers is at the origin of the imbalance that caused the sea to slowly desiccate over the last 4 decades. Level of salinity rose from approximately 10g/l to often more than 100g/l in the remaining Southern Aral. Salinity of the rivers varies with place and time, as well as through the seasons. When going through the desert, rivers often collect some salt compounds residues in the ground that result in higher salinity, but may well be lowered again after going through irrigated lands. Dams also affect salinity, notably by reducing its variability with the seasons. Smaller lakes within the Aral Sea that have stopped being fed by river flows tend to have higher salinity due to evaporation, causing some or all fishes that either survived or had been reintroduced in the 1990s to die. Even re-watering those lakes does not compensate for the increased salinity over the years. In 1998, water level was down by 20m, with a total volume of 210km3 compared to 1,060km3 in 1960. Most of the changes in climate and landscape in the Aral Sea basin that we are about to explore are at the least indirect products of Human induced changes. While we must remember at all times that society is responsible for the crisis that has unfolded in and around the Aral, the point we want to make is that most of the actual changes that have afflicted the Sea since the 1960s are the result of our environment’s reaction to the stresses society has imposed on it. Thus, the difficulty lies as much in understanding the way climate and other natural systems function as in being capable of weighing the potential consequences of our actions before we undertake them. Risk assessment combined with scientific understanding should undercut our actions more efficiently; adding an ethical dimension to the equation remains more than welcome in addition to those more accessible and quantifiable factors, but is too fragile to be the centerpiece on which our decisions rely before we commit to large scale actions which can often, as we are about to see, engender even larger responses from our environment. -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "The Parents Must Be Watch This Video (Tamil)" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3F7VA8cU43A -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 116 Madukkur Mohamed
How can art help mental health?
 
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Subscribe to BBC News www.youtube.com/bbcnews The Bethlem Royal Hospital in south London is the world's oldest psychiatric institution, treating patients for nearly eight centuries. Previously known as Bedlam, over the years the hospital has acquired a huge and significant collection of art and artefacts, much of it by patients. For years it has been stored in unsuitable temporary accommodation. On Thursday a new £4m gallery and museum to show off the collection opens to the public. BBC News was given access to the new space to see how art can play a role in mental health and met one former patient whose work is included in the exhibition. Video journalist: Joe Inwood Subscribe to BBC News HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog Check out our website: http://www.bbc.com/news Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bbcworldnews Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bbcworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/bbcnews
Views: 15843 BBC News
About The Aral Sea
 
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Yusup Kamalov (Karakalpakstan, Uzbekistan). An expert on the Aral Sea problem speaks about the Aral Sea importance in the region.
15 Dramatic Changes on Earth Revealed by NASA
 
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If you compare some of the photographs which can be found on NASA’s website, you can really see how human beings have changed the appearance of our world over the years. The time difference between these images ranges from five to 100 years. Incredible stuff. Other videos you might like: What If Dinosaurs Were Still Alive Today? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeFnH4xux7w& A Unique Creature on Earth That Can Never Be Killed https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8893cgbUfg& The Solar System Is Not Like You Think It Is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FvpAe3MacM& TIMESTAMPS: Pedersen Glacier, Alaska 0:20 Aral Sea, Central Asia 0:44 Lake Oroville, California 1:06 Carroll Glacier, Alaska 1:22 Powell Lake, Arizona and Utah 1:50 Bear Glacier, Alaska 2:19 Forests in Rondonia, Brazil 2:45 McCarty Glacier, Alaska 3:03 The Dasht River, Pakistan 3:22 Matterhorn Mountain in the Alps 3:38 Toboggan Glacier, Alaska 3:54 Great Man-Made River, Libya 4:16 Qori Kalis Glacier, Peru 4:35 Mar Chiquita Lake, Argentina 4:52 Muir Glacier, Alaska 5:08 SUMMARY: - Pedersen Glacier is an outlet glacier located in Kenai Fjords National Park near Seward. The photo taken in 1917 shows that it was an ordinary massive glacier once. No icebergs are visible anymore. - The Aral Sea in Kazakhstan almost disappeared by 2014 due to the extensive irrigation of cotton fields. - Lake Oroville was hit hard by the lack of water while California was suffering from a severe drought. - The photo taken at the same place almost 100 years later shows that the Carroll glacier still exists, but it has serious problems. The ice cap has melted and has been covered with natural debris. - Powell Lake is an artificial reservoir located on the Colorado River. It’s easy to notice that its water level has reduced over 15 years. - The rise in temperature from 1950 to 1990 caused the giant Bear Glacier to retreat by one mile. From 2000 to 2005, it moved another two miles. - Since the 1960s, Amazon rain forests have been actively cut down. According to current estimates, they now have about 80% left. The state of Rondonia in Brazil lost most of its forests. - Toboggan Glacier covered a large territory once. Unfortunately, like many other glaciers on our planet, this one keeps melting fast. Comparing the two photos, you can see that there is less snow in 2000. - Qori Kalis Glacier located in the Andes mountains of Peru. Frankly speaking, it's almost impossible to recognize this place nowadays – the difference is truly shocking. - Mar Chiquita Lake is the biggest salt lake in South America. As you see, it has become smaller in recent years, but the area still looks lush. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 2343810 BRIGHT SIDE
Aral Sea | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Aral Sea Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The Aral Sea () was an endorheic lake (one with no outflow) lying between Kazakhstan (Aktobe and Kyzylorda Regions) in the north and Uzbekistan (Karakalpakstan autonomous region) in the south. The name roughly translates as "Sea of Islands", referring to over 1,100 islands that had dotted its waters; in the Turkic languages aral means "island, archipelago". The Aral Sea drainage basin encompasses Uzbekistan and parts of Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Afghanistan and Iran.Formerly the fourth-largest lake in the world with an area of 68,000 km2 (26,300 sq mi), the Aral Sea has been shrinking since the 1960s after the rivers that fed it were diverted by Soviet irrigation projects. By 1997, it had declined to 10% of its original size, splitting into four lakes – the North Aral Sea, the eastern and western basins of the once far larger South Aral Sea, and one smaller intermediate lake. By 2009, the southeastern lake had disappeared and the southwestern lake had retreated to a thin strip at the western edge of the former southern sea; in subsequent years, occasional water flows have led to the southeastern lake sometimes being replenished to a small degree. Satellite images taken by NASA in August 2014 revealed that for the first time in modern history the eastern basin of the Aral Sea had completely dried up. The eastern basin is now called the Aralkum Desert. In an ongoing effort in Kazakhstan to save and replenish the North Aral Sea, a dam project was completed in 2005; in 2008, the water level in this lake had risen by 12 m (39 ft) compared to 2003. Salinity has dropped, and fish are again found in sufficient numbers for some fishing to be viable. The maximum depth of the North Aral Sea is 42 m (138 ft) (as of 2008).The shrinking of the Aral Sea has been called "one of the planet's worst environmental disasters". The region's once-prosperous fishing industry has been essentially destroyed, bringing unemployment and economic hardship. The water from the diverted Syr Darya river is used to irrigate about 5 million acres (2 million hectares) of farmland in the Ferghana Valley. The Aral Sea region is also heavily polluted, with consequential serious public health problems. UNESCO added the historical documents concerning the development of the Aral Sea to its Memory of the World Register as a unique resource to study this "environmental tragedy".
Views: 44 wikipedia tts
Could planting millions of trees on Uzbekistan's dried out Aral Sea bed help save the Karakalpak.
 
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Could planting millions of trees on Uzbekistan's dried out Aral Sea bed help save the Karakalpak people?find out how toxic chemicals ended up in the exposed sea bed leading to widespread health.
Views: 276 Variation !
A Shrinking Salton Sea Raises Health Concerns
 
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Agencies and residents are turning their attention to air quality as shoreline dries up along California's largest inland body of water.
Views: 1979 KPBS News
As Salton Sea Goes Down, Health Concerns Rise
 
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California's largest lake is shrinking. Activists say it could turn into an environmental disaster and already threatens the health of people who live in the sun-scorched Imperial Valley. (June 3) Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress Get updates and more Breaking News here: http://smarturl.it/APBreakingNews The Associated Press is the essential global news network, delivering fast, unbiased news from every corner of the world to all media platforms and formats. AP’s commitment to independent, comprehensive journalism has deep roots. Founded in 1846, AP has covered all the major news events of the past 165 years, providing high-quality, informed reporting of everything from wars and elections to championship games and royal weddings. AP is the largest and most trusted source of independent news and information. Today, AP employs the latest technology to collect and distribute content - we have daily uploads covering the latest and breaking news in the world of politics, sport and entertainment. Join us in a conversation about world events, the newsgathering process or whatever aspect of the news universe you find interesting or important. Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress http://www.ap.org/ https://plus.google.com/+AP/ https://www.facebook.com/APNews https://twitter.com/AP
Views: 793 Associated Press
Ships Graveyard in the Desert of Moynaq, Uzbekistan
 
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Ships Graveyard in the Desert of Moynaq, Uzbekistan Moynaq ship Graveyard — Mo‘ynoq also spelled as Muynak and Moynaq, is a city in northern Karakalpakstan in western Uzbekistan. Formerly a sea port, now home to only a few thousand residents at most, Mo‘ynoq's population has been declining precipitously since the 1980s due to the recession of the Aral Sea. 30 years ago Moynaq was one of two biggest Soviet fishing harbours at the Aral Sea. The Aral Sea has been steadily decreasing since the 1960s, as the waters of the two rivers feeding it, the Amu Darya and Syr Darya, were aimed at irrigating agricultural areas. Formerly one of the four largest lakes in the world with an area of 68,000 km2 or 26,300 sq mi, the Aral Sea has been steadily shrinking since in 1960s after the rivers that fed it were diverted by Soviet irrigation projects. In 2007, it had declined to 10% of its original size, splitting into four lakes – the North Aral Sea, the eastern and western basins of the once far larger South Aral Sea, and one smaller lake between the North and South Aral Seas.However, in 2009, the southeastern lake had disappeared and the southwestern lake had retreated to a thin strip at the extreme west of the former southern sea. The maximum depth of the North Aral Sea is 42 meter or 138 ft in 2008. The shrinking of the Aral Sea has been called "one of the planet's worst environmental disasters". The region's once-prosperous fishing industry has been essentially destroyed, bringing unemployment and economic hardship. The Aral Sea region is also heavily polluted, with consequent serious public health problems. The retreat of the sea has reportedly also caused local climate change, with summers becoming hotter and drier, and winters colder and longer. In an ongoing effort in Kazakhstan to save and replenish the North Aral Sea, a dam project was completed in 2005; in 2008, the water level in this lake had risen by 12 m or 39 ft compared to 2003. Salinity has dropped, and fish are again found in sufficient numbers for some fishing to be viable. The Aral Sea watershed encompasses Uzbekistan and parts of Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan. Today Mo‘ynoq's major "tourist attractions" are the armada of rusting hulks that once made up the proud fishing fleet during the Soviet era, and a one-room museum devoted to Mo‘ynoq's heritage as a center of the fishing industry. Poisonous dust storms kicked up by strong winds across the dried and polluted seabed give rise to a multitude of chronic and acute illnesses among the few residents who have chosen to remain, most of them ethnic Karakalpaks, and weather unmoderated by the sea now buffets the town with hotter-than-normal summers and colder-than-normal winters. Like us and Join us at Xtreme Collections for more fun and knowledge.
Views: 514 XtremeCollectionS
White Gold - The True Cost Of Cotton
 
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Fashion Victims? Up to one third of Uzbekistan's workforce is made to labour on cotton farms; denied ownership of the land they work, and forced to labour without reasonable wages they are unable to opt out of cotton cultivation -- those who try are subject to violence, imprisonment and intimidation. Tens of thousands of children are forced to pick the cotton harvest each year. Crucially, the suffering caused by this industry comes at the hands of the government. It is the Uzbek state, not the country's mafia that instigates the abuses connected to the production and sale of cotton turning its people in to a slave nation. For more information please visit www.ejfoundation.org The Environmental Justice Foundation is leading an international campaign to end human rights and environmental abuses in cotton production, and to promote organic and fairly traded cotton. In Uzbekistan, tens of thousands of children, some as young as seven, are taken out of school and forced to work in the cotton fields for little or no money during the harvest. The period can last up to three months, during which older children live in dormitories or classrooms under harsh conditions. The combined effect of exhausting work, a poor diet, lack of clean water and exposure to toxic pesticides has a dramatic impact on health. The cotton industry has also caused an ecological disaster. The Aral Sea, once the world's fourth largest inland lake, providing the region with fish and water, has shrunk to 15% of its original size. The salinity of water and soil has increased, and as desperate farmers apply more water to their fields, they exacerbate the problem. This leads to infertile soil and areas of salty desert contaminated with pesticide residues.
Salton Sea could impact southern California
 
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A place that was once flourishing as a popular tourist destination has become a ghost town. and the people who do live there are now facing serious health problems. and if not fixed the issue could plague nearly half of California. RT America’s Natasha Sweatte is at the Salton Sea with an in-depth look. Find RT America in your area: http://rt.com/where-to-watch/ Or watch us online: http://rt.com/on-air/rt-america-air/ Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTAmerica Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_America
Views: 108844 RT America
Caspian evidence
 
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Caspian sea evidence Support research via PayPal https://www.paypal.me/philippdruzhinin Article Ancient Aral sea towns https://sibved.livejournal.com/272373.html
Views: 1308 Philipp Druzhinin
Philip Micklin – Desiccation of the Aral Sea: A Water Management Disaster of the Soviet Union
 
01:10:36
Recorded June 29, 2010 Philip Micklin — Department of Geography, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI -- This interdisciplinary 3-day institute will explore global water issues, including those that affect the Great Lakes region. Daily topics addressed will include: water scarcity, effective water management, and water issues in politics, sanitation, agriculture, and economics. Faculty and staff from the University of Chicago and other educational institutions from around the world will speak each day, interspersed with discussions of K-12 curriculum development. Intended primarily for elementary through community college educators (but open to all interested parties), the Institute will address each theme through a series of presentations and group discussions. Attendees will receive suggested instructional resources for curriculum building and K-12 lessons aligned to Illinois State Standards will be developed based on presentations made at the Institute. This internationally focused conference is presented by The University of Chicago’s Center for International Studies, Program on the Global Environment, Center for East Asian Studies, Southern Asian Language and Area Center, Center for East European and Russian Eurasian Studies, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, and Center for Latin American Studies.
Views: 344 UChicagoCISSR
The other inconvenient truth | Jonathan Foley | TEDxTC
 
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The Other Inconvenient Truth: How Agriculture is Changing the Face of Our Planet We typically think of climate change as the biggest environmental issue we face today. But maybe it's not? In this presentation, Jonathan Foley shows how agriculture and land use are maybe a bigger culprit in the global environment, and could grow even larger as we look to feed over 9 billion people in the future.
Views: 254265 TEDx Talks
Aral Sea disaster
 
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Prepared by: Tleuzhan Sharipullayev Sanzhar Amanzholov Nurbolat Gabassov Danen Dossaibek
सूख गया दुनिया का चौथा सबसे बड़ा सागर, जहाजों को नहीं मिला आगे का रास्ता
 
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In the last 50 years, the world's fourth largest ocean, i.e. Aral Sagar, has dried up to 90 percent. There was also a time when this sea of ​​1534 Island was called the ocean of the islands. The occurrence of drying of the Aral Sea is being considered as one of the biggest environmental disasters in the world. Due to the start of dry season from the ocean began in 1960, and by 1997, the Aral Sea was divided into four lakes. By the year 2009, the southeastern part of the ocean went completely dry, and the south-western part became a thin strip. The most harmful damage to the ocean is its phishing industry. The phishing industry was completely destroyed, due to which unemployment and economic crisis started. The polution has increased due to the drying of the water, and the people living in the area of ​​Aral Sagar are facing problems related to health. It has also had tremendous impact on the weather. Both heat or cold are wreaking havoc. The dam project of Kazakhstan was completed in 2005, to save the sea from drying and its parts to fill the North Aral Sea, after which the level of water in the ocean rose to 12 meters in 2003 compared to 2003. However, despite all this, the situation of the ocean could not be improved much.
Views: 458 101 MASTI
Part 2: The Shrinking Salton Sea Endangers Region’s Health
 
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California’s largest lake, the Imperial Valley’s Salton Sea, is poised to begin shrinking at unprecedented speed this year. The retreat is raising concerns about the future of a place that is considered both an ecological treasure and a looming public health disaster. KPBS Reporter Erik Anderson has a look in the second of two reports.
Views: 598 KPBS News
#AralSea: Frank Schwalba Hoth explains efforts being made
 
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The degradation of the Aral Sea is one of the worst environmental crises that our world has faced, on a par with deforestation of the Amazon rain forest. Thirteen years ago, in October 2003, the government of Kazakhstan announced the beginning of construction of the Kokaral Dam, an ambitious and decisive project. With the support of major international financial institutions, including the World Bank, the country began to address the issue of the possible loss of the Aral Sea. Water levels have now increased from a low of 38m to a more desirable level of 42m. The water surface has increased by 20% and today salinity is at 13 grams per litre, not far from 1960 levels. Fish catches from the region have increased from 52 tons in 2004 to an incredible 11 thousand tons in 2015. Life is slowly reviving. Local residents report better health and well being after the micro-climate around the water body has improved. If the ambitious plans of the government of Khazakstan are realised, then water will return to Aralsk, and the city will become a seaport once again. The lake systems will be restored and environmental and economic recovery of the northern part of the Aral Sea will be an enduring gift to future generations. The challenge is not merely regional, it is global, and the future of the Aral Sea is as important to as yet unborn generations as it is to those living and working in the region today. Frank Schwalba-Hoth, former MEP and one of the 'founding fathers' of Green politics, speaks to EU Reporter's James Drew.
Views: 1074 Eu Reporter
Toxic cloud causing health problems in Russia
 
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An alarming sight but 'don't panic' is the message from Russian authorities as they battle to contain the effects of a toxic spill. The brown-yellow cloud billowed over the city of Chelyabinsk after some 50 litres of the chemical bromine were spilled in a minor rail collision. Close to 150 people are reported to have sought medical help, complaining of various health problems. The poisonous bromine can damage internal organs and the nervous system. ... http://www.euronews.net/
Views: 1679 euronews (in English)
Rayappa Kasi   Aral Sea, MadhaTV Tamil Talk, Episode 41
 
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Aral Sea: Episode 41 Directed by M.D. Kanakaraj The Aral Sea is situated in Central Asia, between the Southern part of Kazakhstan and Northern Uzbekistan. Up until the third quarter of the 20th century it was the world?s fourth largest saline lake, and contained 10grams of salt per liter. The two rivers that feed it are the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers, respectively reaching the Sea through the South and the North. The Soviet government decided in the 1960s to divert those rivers so that they could irrigate the desert region surrounding the Sea in order to favor agriculture rather than supply the Aral Sea basin. The reason why we decided to explore the implications up to today of this human alteration of the environment is precisely that certain characteristics of the region, from its geography to its population growth, account for dramatic consequences since the canals have been dug. Those consequences range from unexpected climate feedbacks to public health issues, affecting the lives of millions of people in and out of the region. By establishing a program to promote agriculture and especially that of cotton, Soviet government led by Khrouchtchev in the 1950s deliberately deprived the Aral Sea of its two main sources of water income, which almost immediately led to less water arriving to the sea. Not only was all this water being diverted into canals at the expense of the Aral Sea supply, but the majority of it was being soaked up by the desert and blatantly wasted (between 25% and 75% of it, depending on the time period). The water level in the Aral Sea started drastically decreasing from the 1960s onward. In normal conditions, the Aral Sea gets approximately one fifth of its water supply through rainfall, while the rest is delivered to it by the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers. Evaporation causes the water level to decrease by the same amount that flows into the Sea, making it sustainable as long as inflow is equal to evaporation on average. Therefore the diversion of rivers is at the origin of the imbalance that caused the sea to slowly desiccate over the last 4 decades.
Views: 77 Rayappa Kasi
जब सूखा दुनिया का सबसे बड़ा सागर तो सामने आयी हैरान करने वाली सच्चाई
 
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The extent of Aral Sagar present between Kazakhstan and Northern Uzbekistan has dried up, it is enough to tell these pictures. In the last 50 years, 90 percent of the world's fourth largest sea or Aral Sea has dried up. There was also a time when this sea of ​​1,534 islands was called the ocean of the islands. The event of drying of the Aral Sea is believed to be one of the biggest environmental disasters in the world. From the 1960s, the process of drying started from the ocean and by 1997, the Aral Sea was divided into four lakes. It was named after the Northern Aral Sea, the Eastern Basin, the Western Basin and the largest part of the Southern Aral Sea. By the year 2009, the south-eastern part of the ocean went completely dry and the south-western part became a thin strip. The most harmful damage to the ocean is its phishing industry. The phishing industry was completely destroyed, due to which the phase of unemployment and economic crisis started. Due to the drying of the water, the polution has increased and people living in the area of ​​Aral Sagar are struggling with health related problems. It has also had tremendous impact on the weather. Both heat or cold are wreaking havoc.
Views: 232 MEXA NEWS
Salton Sea shrinks; restoration funds not spent
 
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Salton Sea shrinks; restoration funds not spent
Views: 1905 ABC 10 News
सूख गया दुनिया का चौथा सबसे बड़ा सागर, जहाजों को नहीं मिला रास्ता
 
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The slim river coming out of Canada's largest glacier is in discussion these days. Scientists have now submitted reports on this river that has dried up in just four days last year. It is mentioned in the way that this river has been caught in global warming. The same hunting of global warming has also happened in the Aral Sea. The world's fourth largest Aral Sea, which is between Kazakhstan and northern Uzbekistan, has completely dried up. - There was also a time when the Arl Sea with 1,534 islands was called the Sea of ​​Islands. But 90 percent of its share has dried in the past 50 years. - The occurrence of drying of the Aral Sea is believed to be one of the biggest environmental disasters in the world. - From 1960 began the process of drying from the ocean and by 1997, the Aral Sea was divided into four lakes. It was named after the Northern Aral Sea, the eastern basin, the west basin and the largest part of the southern Aral Sea. As of 2009, the southeastern part of the ocean has completely dried up and the south-western part is transformed into thin strip. The effect of drying of ocean The most harmful damage to the ocean is its phishing industry. The phishing industry was completely destroyed, due to which the phase of unemployment and economic crisis started. Due to the drying of the water, the polution has increased and people living in the area of ​​Aral Sagar are struggling with health related problems. It has also had tremendous impact on the weather. Both heat or cold are wreaking havoc. Drying of this ocean started from a Soviet project. The flow of rivers for the Soviet Union's Irrigation Project was changed in 1960, after which the process of drying of this ocean continues. The dam project of Kazakhstan was completed in 2005 to save the sea from drying and its parts to fill the Northern Aral Sea, after which the level of water in the ocean rose to 12 meters in 2003 compared to 2003. However, despite all this, the situation of the ocean could not be improved much.
Views: 4046 ADP News
Landing A Wood On The Arals Dry-out Sea Floor
 
06:29
Uzbekistan has an ambitious plan to stop widespread health problems that developed when the Aral Sea disappeared.
Views: 5 OLOLUS
सूख गया दुनिया का सबसे बड़ा सागर, जहाजों को नहीं मिला आगे का रास्ता...
 
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सूख गया दुनिया का चौथा सबसे बड़ा सागर, जहाजों को नहीं मिला आगे का रास्ता... Watch This Video :- https://youtu.be/HhY_no3pxPY The extent of Aral Sagar present between Kazakhstan and Northern Uzbekistan has dried up, it is enough to tell these pictures. In the last 50 years, 90 percent of the world's fourth largest sea or Aral Sea has dried up. There was also a time when this sea of ​​1,534 islands was called the ocean of the islands. The event of drying of the Aral Sea is believed to be one of the biggest environmental disasters in the world. From the 1960s, the process of drying started from the ocean and by 1997, the Aral Sea was divided into four lakes. It was named after the Northern Aral Sea, the Eastern Basin, the Western Basin and the largest part of the Southern Aral Sea. By the year 2009, the south-eastern part of the ocean was completely dry. And the south-western part is transformed into a thin strip. The most harmful damage to the ocean is its phishing industry. The phishing industry was completely destroyed, due to which the phase of unemployment and economic crisis started. Due to the drying of the water, the polution has increased and people living in the area of ​​Aral Sagar are struggling with health related problems. It has also had tremendous impact on the weather. Both heat or cold are wreaking havoc. Drying of this ocean started from a Soviet project. The flow of rivers for the Soviet Union's Irrigation Project was changed in 1960, after which the process of drying of this ocean continues. The dam project of Kazakhstan was completed in 2005, to save the sea from drying and its parts to fill the North Aral Sea, after which the level of water in the ocean rose to 12 meters in 2003 compared to 2003. However, despite all this, the situation of the ocean could not be improved much. Subscribe Us for Latest News & Updates ► https://goo.gl/K8pjDQ Stay Connected with Us : Follow Us On Facebook ► https://goo.gl/GEkOqP Follow Us On Twitter ► https://twitter.com/hjnews4u Follow Us On Google plus ► https://goo.gl/LZglUF HJ NEWS !! HJ NEWS outbreaks the conventional news reading and brings to you the real face of every information at one click! Latest news from India and the world, politics and nation, entertainment, sports and science. Witness the panoramic vision of the state on every aspect you can think of! It is easy for every person to watch the news in form of video rather than reading every sentance.. So, Friends Please Watch , Like , Share & Subscribe HJ NEWS
Views: 4306 HJ NEWS
ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES: WATER INTRODUCTION
 
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ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES: WATER INTRODUCTION
Views: 714 Walter Jahn
Thoughts and Ideas Episode 4 - Climate Change
 
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What is the issue Leave the world in a better place than we got it. Mass extinction of wild animals. Rising sea levels. ❇️ Support me at http://abdullahsameer.com/support What’s happening Loss of wild animals Yuval Harari writes, “If you took all the people in the world and put them on a large set of scales, their combined mass would be about 300 million tons. If you then took all our domesticated farm animals—cows, pigs, sheep and chickens—and placed them on an even larger set of scales, their mass would amount to about 700 million tons. In contrast, the combined mass of all surviving large wild animals—from porcupines and penguins to elephants and whales—is less than 100 million tons. Our children’s books, our iconography and our TV screens are still full of giraffes, wolves and chimpanzees, but the real world has very few of them left. There are about 80,000 giraffes in the world, compared to 1.5 billion cattle; 200,000 wolves, compared to 400 million domesticated dogs; 50 million penguins compared with 50 billion chickens; 250,000 chimpanzees—in contrast to billions of humans. Humankind really has taken over the world.” Rising sea levels The sun melts the ice, which means more water, which then absorbs more sunlight. It’s a snowball effect. In “Bill Nye Saves the World, Episode 1: ‘The Earth is a Hot Mess’” which is on Netflix, much of this is described. He even shows you how in Venice Italy rising water levels are affecting them now. For example there is a bookstore owner who put his books in bath tubs to avoid them getting damaged from the water. Bangkok’s government published a report three years ago warning the city could be underwater in the next 15 years, sinking due to water extraction and heavy buildings pressing into the sediment. With the city only 1.5m above sea level, rising seas are worsening the problems https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2011/sep/06/bangkok-thailand-risks-steadily-sinking Luckily, technology can help, for those who can afford it: The Netherland's Billion Dollar Sea Wall Netherlands solution is to spend money to combat this. https://interestingengineering.com/netherlands-billion-dollar-sea-wall The main problem is that good part of the Netherlands sits below sea-level. Any major fluctuation in the sea depth will cause extensive flooding to a vast amount of land. The plan to solve this included a revolutionary designed dam which incorporated removable gates that were hollow and had the ability to float and be removed. Not all countries are so lucky though The Bangladeshi island that’s disappearing https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/19/opinion/sunday/climate-change-bangladesh.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=image&module=opinion-c-col-right-region&region=opinion-c-col-right-region&WT.nav=opinion-c-col-right-region “My house was over there,” said Zainal Abedin, a farmer, pointing to the waves about 100 feet from the shore. “At low tide, we can still see signs of our house.” Already much of Kutubdia has been swallowed by rising seas, leaving countless families with nothing. Nurul Haque, a farmer who lost all his land to the ocean, told me that he may have to pull his daughter, Munni Akter, 13, out of eighth grade and marry her off to an older man looking for a second or third wife, because he has few financial options left to support her. Coffee A combination of effects, resulting from higher temperatures and shifting rainfall patterns, will make the land where coffee is currently grown unsuitable for its production. According to the National Academy of Science, in Latin America alone, more than 90 per cent of the land used for coffee production could suffer this fate. It’s estimated that Ethiopia, the sixth largest producer in the world, could lose over 60 per cent of its production by 2050. That’s only a generation from now. What we can do Eating Less Meat According to Scientific American meat production (beef, chicken and pork) emits more atmospheric greenhouse gases than do all forms of global transportation or industrial processes. Only energy production generates more greenhouse gases than does raising livestock for food. Stop using plastic water bottles https://www.banthebottle.net/articles/plastic-water-bottles-impose-health-and-environmental-risks/ -plastic water bottles take 700 years to decompose - 86% of water bottles end up in the landfill - 15 to 17 million barrels of oil are used to makes these bottles They overwhelm the recycling centers. Get a water filter instead! Or a water cooler with reusable bottles. Reusable cups/stir sticks One person on Quora calculated that one use wooden sticks just at starbucks is 1800 trees per year. Pretty insane for something you use once and then throw away https://www.quora.com/How-many-trees-does-it-take-to-supply-a-days-worth-of-Starbucks-stir-sticks -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Can Islam Be Reformed?" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfCeLcSe57s -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 1298 Abdullah Sameer
Environmental Health and Safety Case Studies
 
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In this webinar KPA Risk Management Consultant and District Manager Jennifer Blake will provide an in-depth look into real-life Hazmat Spills and Emergencies that have occurred. She will review each mitigation and clean-up process, the inherited liability, and the follow-up to these incidents. This webinar will help to raise awareness about Hazmat Spills and Emergencies and demonstrate how to develop your own implementation process for when an unsuspecting spill occurs at your facility.
Views: 410 KPA
Aquatic Biodiversty:  The Changing Shape Of Our Planet
 
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Aquatic Biodiversty: The Changing Shape Of Our Planet Aquatic biodiversity is important to the health and well-being of our planet, but is being threatened at an increasing rate. It is affected by many variables, including irrigation, contamination, and evaporation. Irrigation Irrigation is, possibly, the most subtle threat to aquatic biodiversity. Until recently, most irrigation issues were considered strictly from an engineering standpoint, with little regard to how construction and maintenance of irrigation channels would affect aquatic biodiversity. body of water's aquatic biodiversity The channels were just earthworks, with no seepage protection. Over time, seepage affects a body of water's aquatic biodiversity by changing its composition, affecting all life in or sustained by it. Contamination of the body of water In the past, lakes were often used as dumping grounds for waste materials. These materials are ingested by native animal and plant life, directly affecting aquatic biodiversity by killing off entire species. According to Philip Micklin and Nikolay V. Aladin's article in the Scientific American, over the last thirty years animal life has decreased as follows: Fish species, from 32 to 6; bird species, from 319 to 160; and mammal species, from 70 to 32. Evaporation If rate of evaporation exceeds rate of rainfall, snowmelt, or groundwater supply, aquatic biodiversity is threatened. volume decreases When a body of water's volume decreases (transforming the area into first a marsh, then dry ground, then eventually a desert) aquatic biodiversity changes as well. Micklin and Aladin state that the Aral Sea has actually suffered sufficient evaporation that it split into two smaller bodies, the Small and Large Aral Seas. Large Aral Sea The Large Aral Sea split again, into a deep western basin, a shallow eastern basin, and an isolated gulf. None are as deep as the original body of water and damage has been done to both plant and animal sectors. They further note that the marshland has decreased from 100,000 hectares in 1960 to 15,000 hectares in the 1990s. percentage of salinity Second, the percentage of salinity (the ratio of salt to water) can rise. Two of the smaller bodies are no longer habitable largely due to this aspect. According to Micklin and Aladin, the salinity of the Large Aral Sea has risen from about 14 grams per liter (g/l) to over 100. ocean's salinity A typical ocean's salinity is about 53 g/l, so this is devastating. What were once lush expanses of plant life sustained by the lake's water are now barren except for the few varieties able to thrive in either saline soil, dry conditions or both. aquatic biodiversity If damage was restricted to this one body of water, the threat to aquatic biodiversity would not necessarily be world-threatening. The problem (exceedingly costly to fix once the damage has begun), however, is spreading. The latest victims are Central Africa's Lake Chad and California's Salton Sea. survival Unfortunately, even economically fortunate countries are cautious in allocating funds for remedying the problems. Unless ways can be found to help smaller countries, where immediate survival is often more urgent than long-term effects, we can expect these changes to continue, with disastrous effects.
Views: 265 DefineBiodiversity
"China Will Disrupt the World:" Economic Meltdown Rant For Sept  29, 2014
 
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In this week's installment of my "Healthy Economy/Sick Planet" rant, I look at six more examples from the mainstream media detailing the inverse relationship between the health of the global economy and the health of the globe. Here is how Big Agriculture destroyed the Aral Sea: http://news.yahoo.com/watch-1-274-square-mile-aral-sea-dry-181445568.html Here is how India is responding to its "energy crisis": http://news.yahoo.com/watch-1-274-square-mile-aral-sea-dry-181445568.html Here is one more way China is planning to "disrupt the world": http://finance.yahoo.com/news/big-shift-china-economy-disrupt-western-retailers-li-135928818--business.html Here is how Japan is faring in Texas: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/630658d8-47ba-11e4-be7b-00144feab7de.html#axzz3EjekmKRC Here is how insurance companies are reacting to climate change: http://news.morningstar.com/articlenet/article.aspx?id=666554&SR=Yahoo Here is how rich Africans will survive the End Times: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-09-29/diageo-targets-further-africa-growth-with-spirits-ahead-of-beer.html?cmpid=yhoo
Views: 246 Humptydumptytribe
RUSSIA: CHECHNYA: REFUGEES FACE SERIOUS HEALTH RISKS
 
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Russian/Nat Cholera, the plague and anthrax are becoming real threats in war-torn Chechnya according to a Russian public health chief. At a press conference today the head of the State Sanitary Committee pointed to the serious health risks confronting the rebel republic . Some of the most vulnerable are the hundreds of thousands of refugees who are living in crowded and sometimes insanitary conditions . Health officials just back from the war zone described the conditions in Chechnya as horrifying. They confirmed reports of contaminated drinking water and admitted that there are now serious threats of an outbreak of cholera, diphtheria and even plague. The sanitary committee has already sent dozens of medics to the region but their work is being hampered by the continued fighting. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) The present time is a crucial period for the development of epidemics but all the work we consider to be absolutely essential is being carried out with the fighting going on in the background. That really does restrict our abilities to move our brigades in the area SUPER CAPTION: Nikolai Shestopalov, Chief of State Sanitation Committee And officials fear that the continued bombing of the area and large numbers of dead cattle could lead to an outbreak of the killer disease anthrax. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) In Grozny there are four burial sites filled with anthrax-infected cattle. It's hard for us to say what condition they are in today. If they are bombed, torn open, the situation will become much more complex. SUPER CAPTION: Yevgeny Belyayev, Chairman State Sanitation Committee Those most in danger are the hundreds of thousands of refugees who have fled the war- torn Republic for the neighbouring havens of Ingushetia and Dagestan. There they are living in crowded, unheated conditions with no real medicine. The sanitary committee has already vaccinated over 2-thousand people in the area against various infectious diseases but local doctors complain of a lack of supplies. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) We have a problem with medicine, food and housing of course. The buildings are cold, there is no heat. SUPER CAPTION: Dr. Leila Muratova, Nazran Hospital But children could suffer the most. The majority have had no immunizations for the past two or three years and are vulnerable through fatigue, cold and hunger. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/0a9ea63ce6dcf08612af776cf0267400 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 71 AP Archive

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