Home
Videos uploaded by user “Vox”
What makes a truly great logo
 
04:45
Here's how a simple mark ends up meaning something big as a great logo. Joe Posner, and Michael Bierut (designer of the Hillary Clinton logo) explain. For more from Michael Bierut on graphic design, check out his book "How to use graphic design to sell things, explain things, make things look better, make people laugh, cry, and (every once in a while) change the world": http://www.amazon.com/How-Michael-Bierut/dp/0062413902 Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO About once a month, there's a new logo to fight about on the internet. The biggest one in recent memory was the highly controversial Hillary Clinton logo, which did not escape scrutiny from Vox.com either. But as a designer/filmmaker, something about these repeated discussions struck me as missing the point on what makes logos tick. It often has little to do with the subjective musings. So I called up Michael Bierut, the designer of that Hillary Clinton logo and countless others. He sat down with me and helped explain the elements of a great logo in the video above. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 3042457 Vox
The 116 images NASA wants aliens to see
 
05:06
Here are all the photos flying through interstellar space on Voyager's Golden Record. http://www.vox.com/2015/11/11/9702090/voyager-golden-record-pictures Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Sources: http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/spacecraft/scenes.html http://www.amazon.com/Pale-Blue-Dot-Vision-Future/dp/0345376595 http://www.amazon.com/Murmurs-Earth-Carl-Sagan-ebook/dp/B00BRUQ4HK/ref=sr_1_1 When Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 launched into space in 1977, their mission was to explore the outer solar system, and over the following decade, they did so admirably. With an 8-track tape memory system and onboard computers that are thousands of times weaker than the phone in your pocket, the two spacecraft sent back an immense amount of imagery and information about the four gas giants, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. But NASA knew that after the planetary tour was complete, the Voyagers would remain on a trajectory toward interstellar space, having gained enough velocity from Jupiter's gravity to eventually escape the grasp of the sun. Since they will orbit the Milky Way for the foreseeable future, the Voyagers should carry a message from their maker, NASA scientists decided. The Voyager team tapped famous astronomer and science popularizer Carl Sagan to compose that message. Sagan's committee chose a copper phonograph LP as their medium, and over the course of six weeks they produced the "Golden Record": a collection of sounds and images that will probably outlast all human artifacts on Earth. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 5192521 Vox
Thin underwater cables hold the internet. See a map of them all.
 
02:59
Your internet isn't just underwater. It's also covered in Vaseline. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Map by TeleGeography: http://www.submarinecablemap.com/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The internet is known to pulse through fiber optic cables and cell phone towers, but 99% of high-speed international information is transferred under the sea. How long has this been happening? Underwater cables delivering information isn't a novel idea — the first Transatlantic cable was laid in 1858—undersea cables have been around since the telegraph. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 2274821 Vox
Why this black hole photo is such a big deal
 
06:29
What it took to collect these 54-million-year-old photons from a supermassive black hole. Become a Video Lab member! http://bit.ly/video-lab This is an updated version of a video we published in 2016 about the Event Horizon Telescope, an international collaboration to image a black hole for the first time in human history. On April 10, 2019, the team announced their results: They had successfully imaged the supermassive black hole in the center of the galaxy m87, which is nearly 54 million light-years away from us. They were able to achieve unprecedented resolution using very long baseline interferometry, which combines the observations of multiple radio telescopes across the globe. The team wanted to find out whether Einstein's Theory of General Relativity holds up in the extreme environment of black holes, and the results do, in fact, seem to be consistent with the predictions. In the future, we may see more and shaper images of black holes as the team targets smaller wavelengths of light and recruits more telescopes. Eventually, they may include an orbiting space telescope. Vox Observatory takes a magnifying glass to some of life's most interesting questions with a focus on science and technology. Watch other Vox Observatory videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAoEHR4aW8I&list=PLJ8cMiYb3G5eNMPb_MTRyLDzm_AOIk7UF Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: https://www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 5255019 Vox
The 1995 Hubble photo that changed astronomy
 
05:27
The Hubble Deep Field, explained by the man who made it happen. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Click here to download the Hubble Deep Field images: http://www.spacetelescope.org/science/deep_fields/ /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 2929557 Vox
Here's what happens to your knuckles when you crack them
 
01:35
One man cracked his knuckles in one hand for 60 years and not the other. Watch the video to see what he found out. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Vox.com is news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 31096069 Vox
The World War II meme that circled the world
 
02:08
Kilroy was here — those three words showed up in a lot of surprising places. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ We know about the epic drama of World War II, but what about the jokes? The above video tells the story (as best as we can). The iconic piece of graffiti that was known, in America, as "Kilroy Was Here" traveled the world in a fashion remarkably similar to a modern meme. Read some more background here: http://www.vox.com/2015/12/11/9886246/kilroy-was-here Sounds via RiverNile7, Daemeon1427, and JasonElrod, found at Freesound.org. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 3313350 Vox
Asian flush, explained
 
03:16
It's not because they're drunker than you are. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Asian flush, also widely known as Asian glow, is when Chinese, Japanese and Korean people turn red after drinking alcohol. What causes Asian glow? Genetics, basically. Around 36% of Northeast Asians are deficient in one of the enzymes that metabolizes alcohol, due to a gene mutation called ALDH2*2. This leads to a buildup of a toxic substance called acetaldehyde, which causes Asian flush and can also cause cancer, especially esophageal cancer. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 2054199 Vox
Apollo 11’s journey to the moon, annotated
 
05:14
The moon landing was a feat of engineering, accomplished through the careful deconstruction of a 3,000 ton spacecraft. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Apollo 11 launched on July 16, 1969, carrying Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins on a journey to pull off humankind’s first moon landing. The eight-day journey was made possible by the careful deconstruction of the Saturn V rocket and Apollo spacecraft, and made use of a technique of docking components of the spacecraft in lunar orbit so the astronauts could land on, and then launch from, the lunar surface. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Views: 1035339 Vox
Scientists agree: Coffee naps are better than coffee or naps alone
 
02:25
Is your napping technique backed up by scientific research? This one is. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO --- It's counterintuitive, but scientists agree that drinking coffee before napping will give you a stronger boost of energy than either coffee or napping alone. To understand a coffee nap, you have to understand how caffeine affects you. After it's absorbed through your small intestine and passes into your bloodstream, it crosses into your brain. There, it fits into receptors that are normally filled by a similarly shaped molecule called adenosine. Adenosine is a byproduct of brain activity, and when it accumulates at high enough levels, it plugs into these receptors and makes you feel tired. But with the caffeine blocking the receptors, it's unable to do so. Here's the trick of the coffee nap: sleeping naturally clears adenosine from the brain. So if you nap for those 20 minutes, you'll reduce your levels of adenosine just in time for the caffeine to kick in. The caffeine will have less adenosine to compete with, and will thereby be even more effective in making you alert. --- Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 1483342 Vox
The bizarre physics of fire ants
 
03:59
They're not just an animal, they're a material. And that's got engineers interested. // Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO For more information about the Hu lab: http://www.hu.gatech.edu/ Red imported fire ants (solenopsis invicta) are native to South America and an invasive species in the United States. One of the adaptations that makes them so hardy is that they can build large structures by linking their bodies together. This is how they form rafts that can float during floods. When they're aggregated together, fire ants can be seen as a material and the Hu lab at Georgia Tech has been testing that material for years. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 3228959 Vox
Why people never smiled in old photos
 
03:20
Early portraits looked pretty grim. A lot of old photos from the 19th and early 20th century are fraught with doom and gloom—and on the occasion the literal dead face. That led to the popular belief that people just did not smile in old photographs. The common explanation is due to the limited technology at the time to capture a smile. Exposure times were long and the thinking was it's easier to hold a serious expression over a long period. Another theory included early photography being heavily influenced by painting (which meant no smiling). Read more on why photographs were sans smiles at: http://www.vox.com/2015/4/8/8365997/smile-old-photographs Video by Phil Edwards and Gina Barton. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 1950345 Vox
What a conductor actually does on stage
 
04:42
It’s more than just dancing around. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO If you’ve ever seen an orchestra perform you’ve probably had a difficult time looking away from the person dead center on the stage – the conductor. It’s hard to miss someone as they swing their arms around pointing at the musicians that seem to be focused instead on their music stands. So what exactly is the conductor doing? We decided to ask James Gaffigan – a conductor who recently guest conducted the New York Philharmonic in Central Park – just what it is that makes a conductor so necessary and how their actions shape the performance. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Views: 1817452 Vox
Airplane black boxes, explained
 
05:31
Sometimes flight recorders are the only way the victims' families will know what happened to the plane. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Immediately following an airplane crash anywhere in US territory, the National Transportation Safety Board dispatches a team of investigators to survey the wreckage, gather information from the airline and from air traffic control, and retrieve the plane's so-called "black boxes." These flight recorders — one stores cockpit audio recordings, the other stores airplane instrument data — are sent to NTSB's lab in Washington, DC, for analysis. There, officials listen to what are sometimes the pilots' final, panicked moments of life. They interpret not only what the pilots were saying before the crash but also any snaps, bangs, and alarms captured by the cockpit area microphone. By combining those audio clues with data from the plane's instruments and sensors, as well as evidence from the scene, investigators can usually determine the cause of the crash, even in cases with no surviving witnesses. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 1659341 Vox
Why ships used this camouflage in World War I
 
05:00
Dazzle camouflage was fantastically weird. It was also surprisingly smart. WWII saw another kind of strange history unfold: a meme (yes, really). Watch our video on it here: http://bit.ly/2Co9DEu Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Dazzle camouflage was a surprisingly effective defense against torpedoes. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explains why. World War I ships faced a unique problem. The u-boat was a new threat at the time, and its torpedoes were deadly. That led artist Norman Wilkinson to come up with dazzle camouflage (sometimes called “razzle dazzle camouflage”). The idea was to confuse u-boats about a ship’s course, rather than try to conceal its presence. In doing so, dazzle camouflage could keep torpedoes from hitting the boat — and that and other strategies proved a boon in World War I. This camouflage is unusual, but its striking appearance influenced the culture, inspired cubist painters’ riffs, and even entered into the world of fashion. Though dazzle camouflage lost its utility once radar and other detection techniques took over from u-boat periscopes, for a brief period in time it was an effective and unusual way to help ships stay safe. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Views: 1884598 Vox
Why Japan has so many vending machines
 
04:47
What vending machines can teach you about this country Subscribe to the Vox Borders newsletter for weekly updates: http://www.vox.com/borders-email Follow Johnny for more photos and videos from his travels around the globe. Facebook: https://goo.gl/l0x5cA Instagram: https://goo.gl/CduwlO While in Japan I noticed vending machines everywhere. Looking into it a little deeper a discovered that there's a very interesting answer to why Japan has so many vending machines. It's an economic story but it's also a story about how Japanese society values robotics and automation. I even found a business card vending machine: https://youtu.be/Ogb7FyzQhbk Vox Borders is a new international series focused on telling the human stories that emerge from lines on the map. Johnny will travel to six border locations to produce a final set of documentaries. While he travels he'll release dispatches on YouTube and Facebook documenting his experiences. Learn more: http://www.vox.com/borders-dispatch Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 4090653 Vox
The Panama Papers, explained with piggy banks
 
02:07
A massive document leak reveals the secrets of shell companies. Matt Yglesias explains, adapting an analogy from reddit user DanGliesack: https://www.reddit.com/r/explainlikei... For much more on the Panama Papers, check out the full explanation at Vox.com: http://www.vox.com/2016/4/3/11356326/... Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 891801 Vox
Mercury retrograde, explained WITHOUT astrology
 
03:50
The science buried under the pseudoscience. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Sources: Mars photography by Tunç Tezel: http://www.twanight.org/newtwan/galleries.asp?Sort=Photographer&Value=Tunc%20Tezel&page=1 Mars visualization from Nooch 86: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TK9ozJYELR8 Solar system orbits via Michael Van Daniker, Andrew Lund, and the Astronomy Workshop of Douglas Hamilton at U. Maryland http://janus.astro.umd.edu/SolarSystems/ Ptolemaic system vsualizer via Nebraka Astronomy Applet Project: http://astro.unl.edu/naap/ssm/animations/ptolemaic.html Retrograde motion visualizer via MHeducation: http://highered.mheducation.com/olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=swf::800::600::/sites/dl/free/0072482621/78780/Retro_Nav.swf::Retrograde%20Motion Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 920946 Vox
The booming CBD craze, explained
 
04:51
This marijuana extract is everywhere. But does it work? Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Read more about CBD on Vox.com: https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2018/11/1/18024806/cbd-oil-vape-hemp Cannabidiol is having a moment. Increasingly common state legalization and loose federal regulation means that anyone in any state can go online or to a physical store and buy CBD products — from oils to dog treats to bath bombs — without fear of arrest. It’s been shown to help treat a number of conditions including psychosis, anxiety, movement disorders, multiple sclerosis, and epilepsy and seizures. For years, people have used medical marijuana to address those conditions — but CBD is showing promise as a possible way to get the benefits of medical cannabis without getting high. Here’s the catch: Most of the CBD products that have trickled down to the consumer market are poorly labeled and have extremely low doses. Granted, it’s possible that the placebo effect is providing CBD users with tangible benefits. And it’s also possible that low-dose CBD products can act as a form of microdosing, where users take small amounts of a substance to achieve milder or entirely different results than a full dose. CBD isn’t a scam. It’s a powerful substance with a lot of medical potential. But most of the stuff on the market now probably isn’t worth your time. Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: CBD is everywhere. But does it work? Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Views: 1006335 Vox
What Bill Gates is afraid of
 
04:33
What's likeliest to kill more than 10 million human beings in the next 20 years? It's probably not what you'd think. For much more, read Ezra Klein's feature story at Vox: http://www.vox.com/2015/5/27/8660249/gates-flu-pandemic Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 5476954 Vox
The real story of the Green Book
 
04:17
Until the Civil Rights Act passed in 1964, the Green Book was critical for black Americans wanting to travel across the country. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Road tripping in the 20th century became an iconic American obsession, and the rising middle class was eager to travel the country on the new interstate highway system. The Green Book was a unique travel guide during this time, when segregation was practiced all over the country. The book, which grew to cover locations in all 50 states, listed hotels, restaurants, gas stations, beauty salons, and other services that would reliably serve African Americans. The listings grew from user correspondence and a network of African American postal workers under the guidance of Victor Hugo Green, the book’s publisher. The American road trip would go on to be an anchor in the civil rights discussion, as it highlighted the injustices and prejudice that African Americans suffered under Jim Crow. Before the Civil Rights Act outlawed racial discrimination in public accommodations, Victor Green’s booklet helped black Americans navigate their country. Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: The guide book that helped black Americans travel during segregation Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Views: 852849 Vox
How the NFL's magic yellow line works
 
04:36
The clever engineering behind the virtual yellow first-down line you seen on TV for NFL games. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Since the late 1990s, the virtual yellow line has been quietly enhancing football broadcasts by giving viewers a live, intuitive guide to the state of play. The graphic is engineered to appear painted on the field, rather than simply plopped on top of the players, so it doesn't distract from the game at all. The line debuted during a September 27, 1998, game between the Baltimore Ravens and the Cincinnati Bengals. It was developed by a company called Sportvision Inc. and operated by six people in a 48-foot semi-truck parked outside the stadium. ESPN was the only network that immediately agreed to pay the steep price of $25,000 per game. Before long, other companies began offering the yellow line to the other networks, and now you won't see a football game without it. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 3058940 Vox
The royal weddings that shaped European history
 
06:41
To Queen Victoria, marriages were about strategic alliances. Correction: At 5:38, the map of post-war Germany is missing eastern Prussia. The borders of Austria-Hungary should also include portions of northern Serbia and southern Poland. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO This video was produced in collaboration between Vox and BBCThree. Over the course of her 63-year reign, Queen Victoria strategically planned marriages to place her descendants in royal families all over Europe. In doing so, she created one of the most remarkable royal families in history. By the early 19th century, Europe had been at war for decades. After the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars killed millions, European leaders came together to restore peace by reshaping major states for a new balance of power. Great Britain went on to become one of the strongest states. And years later, Queen Victoria and her husband Albert came up with a plan to maintain that political power — they married their children to monarchs across Europe. By the 1880s Queen Victoria’s children were in several important branches of Europe’s monarchies. The royal unions didn't play out as Queen Victoria planned, but she continued to make more matches anyway. She had 42 grandchildren, and these 7 ended up on royal thrones. Her grandchildren would end up on the thrones of Britain, Russia, Germany, Romania, Norway, and Spain leading up to the most destructive war Europe had ever seen. To truly understand the international conflicts and trends shaping our world you need a big-picture view. Video journalist Sam Ellis uses maps to tell these stories and chart their effects on foreign policy. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Views: 1539239 Vox
How you could get away with murder in Yellowstone’s “Zone of Death"
 
03:34
There's a 50 square mile section of land in Idaho where a murderer could get away scot free. Read more here: http://www.vox.com/2014/5/22/5738756/you-can-kill-someone-in-a-section-of-yellowstone-and-get-away-scot Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 2804291 Vox
The deadly race to the South Pole
 
05:37
Two exploration teams raced to the South Pole. Only one made it out alive. Correction: A previous version of this video used an outdated British flag. The error has been corrected. We also occasionally referred to the British team as English. In fact, some members of Scott's team were Scottish and Welsh. Help us make our channel more ambitious by joining the Vox Video Lab. Becoming a member brings you closer to our work and gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with your favorite Vox creators. Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Robert Falcon Scott was a British explorer who dreamed of being the first person to reach the South Pole. In 1912, he reached the Pole only to learn that his Norwegian rival, Roald Amundsen, had beat him to it. Caught by freakish weather and a string of bad luck, his entire party died trying to get back. Reasons for his failure range from his use of ponies rather than dogs to a highly unusual temperature drop that made the journey back impossible to survive. Darkroom is a new series from Vox producer Coleman Lowndes that digs into stories of the past, one photograph at a time. Watch all the episodes here: http://bit.ly/2U4qGDI Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Views: 1203485 Vox
Why are weddings so damn expensive?
 
04:43
A wedding videographer explains the bizarre economics of your big day. Listen to NPR's Planet Money on why wedding dresses are so expensive: http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2011/08/05/138760908/why-are-wedding-dresses-so-expensive Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 1617664 Vox
Why we say “OK”
 
05:22
How a cheesy joke from the 1830s became the most widely spoken word in the world. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO OK is thought to be the most widely recognized word on the planet. We use it to communicate with each other, as well as our technology. But it actually started out as a language fad in the 1830’s of abbreviating words incorrectly. Young intellectuals in Boston came up with several of these abbreviations, including “KC” for “knuff ced,” “OW” for “oll wright,” and KY for “know yuse.” But thanks to its appearance in Martin Van Buren’s 1840 presidential re-election campaign as the incumbents new nickname, Old Kinderhook, OK outlived its abbreviated comrades. Later, widespread use by early telegraph operators caused OK to go mainstream, and its original purpose as a neutral affirmative is still how we use it today. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Views: 4038624 Vox
Harry Potter and the translator's nightmare
 
05:54
Accio Harry Potter translations! Translating the Harry Potter books written by J.K. Rowling, in over 60 languages around the world, was not for the faint of heart or vocabulary. Translators didn't have advanced copies of the books to get a headstart and these books could take months to adapt from English. They also had to be clever in their solutions because the books are filled with wordplays, invented words, puns, British culture references, riddles, and more. The longest book, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, at 870 pages was published June 21, 2003. The first translation of it was ready July 21, 2003. Translators had to work day and night to have them ready for eager readers. Even then, fans still banded together to create illegal translations of the series. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 2173135 Vox
A brief history of America and Cuba
 
06:14
150 years of tension may be coming to an end. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 1610478 Vox
The (mostly) true story of hobo graffiti
 
05:37
What we know about hobo graffiti comes from hobos — a group that took pride in embellishing stories. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Hobos, or tramps, were itinerant workers and wanderers who illegally hopped freight cars on the newly expanding railroad in the United States in the late 19th century. They used graffiti, also known as tramp writing, as a messaging system to tell their fellow travelers where they were and where they were going. Hobos would carve or draw their road persona, or moniker, on stationary objects near railroad tracks, like water towers and bridges. But news stories at the time spread tales of a different kind of graffiti. They included coded symbols that were supposedly drawn on fence posts and houses to convey simple messages to tramps. Seeing an image of a cat on a fence post indicated “kind lady lives here,” for example. While this language probably existed to a certain extent, it certainly was not as widespread as the media led readers to believe. In reality, these stories were largely informed by hobos — a group that took pride in embellishing stories so they could remain elusive.
Views: 893956 Vox
Why Elon Musk says we're living in a simulation
 
03:40
You may like playing The Sims, but Elon Musk says you are the Sim. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Check out the full cartoon by Alvin Chang: http://www.vox.com/technology/2016/6/23/12007694/elon-musk-simulation-cartoon Elon Musk thinks we are living in a simulated reality. Nick Bostrom think those chances are more around 20 percent. The chances of human kind participating in a simulated reality is broken down into three options: 1) humans go extinct before we are able to run a simulation of this size. 2) Humans are uninterested in running ancestor simulations. 3) We are currently participating in the simulation. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 7871096 Vox
Why Stradivarius violins are worth millions
 
05:04
Many musicians prefer these 300-year-old instruments, but are they actually worth it? Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Antonio Stradivari is generally considered the greatest violin maker of all time. His violins are played by some of the top musicians in the world and sell for as much as $16 million. For centuries people have puzzled over what makes his violins so great and they are the most scientifically studied instruments in history. I spoke to two world class violinists who play Stradivarius violins as well as a violin-maker about what makes Stradivari so great. Special thanks to Stefan Avalos for the Stradivari research footage. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Views: 2069166 Vox
It’s not you. Phones are designed to be addicting.
 
05:49
The 3 design elements that make smartphones so hard to put down, explained by Google’s former design ethicist. Check out Christophe's video on how designers find inspiration in nature: http://bit.ly/2DDIQAL Read Ezra Klein's full interview with Tristan Harris: http://bit.ly/2og5v0H Read our interview with Catherine Price: http://bit.ly/2C8gxsT Batch notification research by the Center for Advanced Hindsight, Duke University & Synapse Inc Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Today’s phones are hard to put down. Push notifications buzz in your pocket, red bubbles demand attention, and endless distractions sit at your fingertips. It can feel impossible to pull away from. But that’s kind of the point. When people talk about the “attention economy,” they’re referring to the fact that your time and attention are the currency on which today’s applications make money. Because apps profit off of the total time you spend on their platform, there’s a strong incentive to use psychological tricks to keep you endlessly hooked. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Tristan Harris, who runs Time Well Spent, is working to create a world where platforms can more honestly respect their users’ time. By Design is a new Vox video series about the intersection of design and technology, hosted by Christophe Haubursin. Stay tuned for more, and check out Christophe's most recent work exploring design in our Vox + 99% Invisible collaboration: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJ8cMiYb3G5fHjUoTiRuJVucCLxYJliQ_ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 1389555 Vox
Why Cuban cab drivers earn more than doctors
 
05:01
In Cuba, cab drivers are the one percent Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Cuba’s economy works as a central planning model, where government ministries dole out resources and set everything from prices to inventories to salaries. The fact that a taxi driver can make so much more than a physician is a reflection of the Cuban government’s heavy focus on tourism. For years, the central planning apparatus has valued tourism as a key mechanism for both bringing in revenue as well as propagating the idea that Cuba is thriving. Many pesos are collected by the high prices on everything related to the tourism industry. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 5043825 Vox
Products that promise "detox" are a sham. Yes, all of them.
 
04:10
Humans have worried about toxins since Ancient Egypt. We can relax. Read more: http://goo.gl/2lWgZS Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 545910 Vox
Why knights fought snails in medieval art
 
04:37
Look in the margins of medieval books and you'll find an unusual theme: knights vs. snails. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Lillian Randall's paper is here: https://www.scribd.com/document/263159779/The-Snail-in-Gothic-Marginal-Warfare And Michael Camille's book about marginal art can be found here: http://www.reaktionbooks.co.uk/display.asp?K=9780948462283 http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/distributed/I/bo3536323.html Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Medieval snails and knights — who knew? It turns out that medieval illuminated manuscripts featured a lot of bizarre imagery in the margins, but this pocket of art history might be one of the most intriguing. Scholar Lilian Randall provides the best theory for the unusual motif: these medieval knights fought snails in the margins because snails represented the Lombards, who had become widely despised lenders throughout Europe. Snail was an insult and, over time, it became a type of meme detached from its original meaning. Of course, like much of art history, this theory is just a theory. But it gives us an insight into the rich culture of marginal art and all the complexity, confusion, and amusement that sits on the side of the page. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 2721632 Vox
Why cartoon characters wear gloves
 
04:57
Animators had a few tricks up their slee...err gloves. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 9305829 Vox
How the BBC makes Planet Earth look like a Hollywood movie
 
08:48
The technology behind the cinematic style of the BBC's Planet Earth II. Check back next Monday for the next episode in this mini-series. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO And check out BBC Earth's channels: https://www.youtube.com/user/BBCEarth https://www.youtube.com/user/EarthUnpluggedTV Planet Earth II is airing Saturdays on BBC America. Full episodes will also be streaming the day after they air on BBCAmerica.com for subscribers. http://www.bbcamerica.com/shows/planet-earth-ii/where-to-watch Clips from BBC: Iguana vs. snakes (Planet Earth II) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rv9hn4IGofM Attenborough & sloth (Life of Mammals) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndMKTnSRsKM Komodo dragon (Zoo Quest) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6z_PjBppGY Attenborough & orangutans (Zoo Quest) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=692fiaoJWy8 Indri (Zoo Quest) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OALx3kKJhqA Lion hunt (Wild Africa) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XabZLTpugN8 Kangaroo (Life of Mammals) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AiTG6T9pTcM Herbivores (Life of Mammals) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtnLNmB3ZNE Polar bear (Planet Earth) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSWa8DZEy84 Wolf hunt (Life of Mammals) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_UH-6r5jrGI Wolf hunt (Planet Earth) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0E6geAq1k8 And many more on BBC's mobile app: Sir David Attenborough's Story of Life http://www.bbc.com/earth/storyoflife // Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 3082331 Vox
The world is poorly designed. But copying nature helps.
 
06:50
Biomimicry design, explained with 99% Invisible. Check them out here: https://99percentinvisible.org/ Subscribe to our channel here: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Japan’s Shinkansen doesn’t look like your typical train. With its long and pointed nose, it can reach top speeds up to 150–200 miles per hour. It didn’t always look like this. Earlier models were rounder and louder, often suffering from the phenomenon of "tunnel boom," where deafening compressed air would rush out of a tunnel after a train rushed in. But a moment of inspiration from engineer and birdwatcher Eiji Nakatsu led the system to be redesigned based on the aerodynamics of three species of birds. Nakatsu’s case is a fascinating example of biomimicry, the design movement pioneered by biologist and writer Janine Benyus. She's a co-founder of the Biomimicry Institute, a non-profit encouraging creators to discover how big challenges in design, engineering, and sustainability have often already been solved through 3.8 billion years of evolution on earth. We just have to go out and find them. This is one of a series of videos we're launching in partnership with 99% Invisible, an awesome podcast about design. 99% Invisible is a member of http://Radiotopia.fm Additional imagery from the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 4515061 Vox
How a case gets to the US Supreme Court
 
05:10
The only way is by surviving "the rule of four". Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Most often, the US Supreme Court grants or denies petitions to hear a case after reviewing a written request called a "petition for writ of certiorari". Also called "the writ of cert", it is reviewed by the Justices and granting the petition depends on whether or not it passes "the rule of four". If it does, the case is probably one of three types: a case of national importance, a case in which a lower court decision has invalidated federal law, or a case involving a split decision in lower courts. Famously, Bush v. Gore was an example of national importance, Gonzales v. Raich was a case in which a lower court invalidated federal law, and Obergefell v. Hodges was selected by the Court in order to resolve a circuit split decision. By following this protocol of case selection, the Court has been designed to be reactive to legislative decisions made in other branches of government, as opposed to an active legislative body that seeks to create and institute new laws. Overall, the result of this design is a Court that prioritizes case selections that will enable them to enforce the uniformity of federal law throughout the country. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 785415 Vox
Want faster wifi? Here are 5 weirdly easy tips.
 
02:01
We've been putting our routers in the wrong place this whole time. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Find many more wifi tips here: http://www.vox.com/2014/12/31/7471309/wifi-faster Wifi map courtesy of Jason Cole https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hcK9B4HHY8 http://jasmcole.com/2014/08/25/helmhurts/ Wifi signals are made of radio waves that have a shorter wavelength than AM radio and cell phones but longer than satellite tv. How can I make my wifi faster? There are several things you can do to make your wifi faster without paying more, and they mostly have to do with the placement of your wifi router. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 7677583 Vox
NASA's incredible mission to Pluto, explained
 
03:47
A tiny spacecraft has been traveling 9 years for this moment — the day we finally get a close look at Pluto. Here's what you need to know about NASA's New Horizon's mission. Learn more: http://www.vox.com/2015/7/9/8921713/pluto-mission-new-horizons-nasa-flyby Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 972572 Vox
Why parrots can talk like humans
 
04:22
Monkeys are our closest biological relatives, and they can't speak. But parrots don’t seem to have a problem at all. This video is presented by Wix: https://www.wix.com/go/vox Become a Video Lab member! http://bit.ly/video-lab In 2016 researchers released a study with an incredible headline: monkey vocal tracts are speech-ready. It showed that monkeys are held back from speech not by their bodies, but by their brains. But if that’s the case, what’s the deal with birds? Parrots are known for their ability to mimic human speech with incredible accuracy. It’s jarring to hear an animal so vastly different from us speaking our language. So how do they do it? Partially, neurology: parrots are wired for communication in ways other animals (including other birds) are not. But it’s largely physiology. Birds are uniquely equipped to make sounds, and this video will give you a basic overview of how that works. Throughout reporting this piece I had several conversations with Dr. Irene Pepperberg – If you’re interested in the neurology of these birds, I highly recommend checking out her studies on African Grey parrots. I’ve linked to a few of them below: Evidence for Conceptual Quantitative Abilities in the African Grey Parrot: Labeling of Cardinal Sets Acquisition of the same/different concept by an African Grey parrot: Learning with respect to categories of color, shape, and material Number Comprehension by a Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus), Including a Zero-Like Concept Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Views: 1693704 Vox
Kanye, deconstructed: The human voice as the ultimate instrument
 
08:51
Kanye West's music orbits around the power and flexibility of the human voice. Special thanks to Martin Connor. More of his hip hop analysis can be found here: http://www.rapanalysis.com/ Here's a spotify playlist for some select Kanye West tracks. https://open.spotify.com/user/estellecaswell/playlist/4We6iitXGS13jnzujboBHe http://www.vox.com/2016/9/1/12735222/kanye-west-human-voice-instrument Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 3342775 Vox
Meet the enormous boats that carry your stuff
 
02:34
The largest container ship in the world launched earlier this month. It's nearly the size of four football fields. Here's how container ships got so huge and transformed the global economy. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Sources: The Box, by Marc Levinson: http://www.amazon.com/The-Box-Shipping-Container-Smaller/dp/0691136408 Eric Burniche http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15460454056 David AE Levy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6lV5QR_4qk MSC via Vimeo http://vimeo.com/114546802 Maersk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U_QChxYgYWw CaptMikeRossiter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHPEGzQ4_ys MINISTRO2010 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkr_n-9-x9Q Port of Antwerp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xtyWgPC84ss Natures Lullaby https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9H5kzSt1yg Academic Film Archive of North America https://archive.org/details/TheSeaport Prelinger Archive https://archive.org/details/IndustryOnPa ttz_shirasawa https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2Kbrj9L9CMDrm1cY0Dx-Lw tariqismrgrumpy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lJx9OImrLcg USArmyBigPicture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5lOpXdOlr8 webministriestv https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcuKON5iFzg BM SERVICE Tenerife https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_Cz2eFQmOE chlordk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6zuwLVOrkiM Allison Swaim https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2qGh9n5Mio Humberto Florez/Sea-Land Service https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ECQVohqeUu4 lyzadanger http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Fredmeyer.jpg Freddycat1 https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/4335006028 /// Vox.com is news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 2826063 Vox
How Norway designed a more humane prison
 
04:31
There’s a better way to design prison architecture. Become a Video Lab member! http://bit.ly/video-lab Halden Prison in Norway looks sort of like a fancy dorm room or a hotel — much different than the barbed wire and cramped cells we often associate with prison design. Its look is all part of a plan to create a more humane prison, one where the architecture isn’t part of the punishment. Most prisons around the world are consolidated into one single building. This style makes it easy and efficient for inmates to move around, but the design is monotonous and full of visually unappealing materials, like steel and concrete. Plus, tight quarters inside these spaces can foster conflict. Halden has a different structure: a campus design, where inmates move from one building to another, and are surrounded by lots of windows and construction materials that help muffle noise and take advantage of natural light. The prison’s layout also encourages guards to interact with inmates face-to-face, which fosters better relationships and reduces security-related incidents. Halden’s design style is expensive — which is why we mostly see it implemented in places with good social support systems, like Western Europe and Scandinavia. Still, the design is setting new standards for what prisons could be like in the future. By Design is a new Vox video series about the intersection of design and technology, hosted by Christophe Haubursin. Check out all the By Design episodes here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUMa0QkPzns&list=PLJ8cMiYb3G5eD0M1Bfm6lvHy5BR6hoY8X Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: Norway is designing a more humane prison Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Views: 1633546 Vox
How the inventor of Mario designs a game
 
05:55
Shigeru Miyamoto's design philosophy, explained. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 3222492 Vox
How the Mona Lisa became so overrated
 
05:40
It's not just the smile. There are a few real reasons Mona is so famous. Vox's Phil Edwards looked into it... Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Read the full article for citations and details here: http://www.vox.com/2016/9/20/12941736/mona-lisa-famous Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 2647215 Vox
2016 Olympics: What Rio doesn’t want the world to see
 
08:37
Rio is hiding poor people. See Part II: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3BRTlHFpBU Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The 2016 Olympics are set to begin in just over a month in Rio de Janeiro. As the city prepares to receive an influx of international visitors, it is building new infrastructure and transportation systems to accommodate the surge. But the city is also undergoing another major project: hiding and removing poor people from view of foreign onlookers. I went to Rio to see how the city is transforming to make way for the Olympics Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 6242114 Vox
I didn't bring business cards to Japan. Big mistake.
 
01:39
The ritual of Japanese business cards. Subscribe to the Vox Borders newsletter for weekly updates: http://www.vox.com/borders-email Follow Johnny for more photos and videos from his travels around the globe. Facebook: https://goo.gl/l0x5cA Instagram: https://goo.gl/CduwlO Ritual and ceremony are paramount in Japanese culture. Together, they dictate social interactions at both the macro and micro scales of society. Understanding and navigating these norms can be difficult, but sometimes the solution is waiting in Tokyo’s metro. Vox Borders is a new international series focused on telling the human stories that emerge from lines on the map. Johnny will travel to six border locations to produce a final set of documentaries. While he travels he'll release dispatches on YouTube and Facebook documenting his experiences. Learn more: http://www.vox.com/borders-dispatch Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 974154 Vox