Home
Videos uploaded by user “Alberta Urban Garden Simple Organic and Sustainable”
How to Grow, Prune and Transplant Raspberries
 
03:31
How to Prune and Transplant Raspberries Raspberries are by far my favorite perennial. They are great for snacks with the kids to making wine they are a great addition to any garden. Raspberries send out new canes every year and require two different varieties for cross pollination. Generally after the individual cane produce fruit they either die or dont produce anymore. Of caution they do sucker and that is why we are moving one of them today. Mowing around them helps keep them from spreading. A general rule of thumb is per 1 square meter or 3.3 square feet to have 10 canes for them to produce well. I generally start my fall pruning when the leafs have begun to change color and drop. The leave change signals the plant is taking back some of the nutrients into the root system. To pick out the canes that need to be removed you can do it one of two ways. the first Looking for the signs of this years fruit. The second and i find the easiest is to do is to look at the bark. The older bark will be darker in colour with larger thorns and cracking. When working with the raspberries i recommend using leather gloves to protect yourself. When pruning make sure to clip right to the ground and remove. The canes are independent of each other and stubs are harder to remove later. When your done pruning you can transplant if you need to. Dig the transplant hole first making sure it is larger then the plant. when selecting the location for transplant I chose to have clear access around for a lawnmower and far enough away from the other plants to ensure shading does not happen. dig around the plant giving it 30 cm or 12 inches from the canes. try to move them all as one unit in order to avoid disturbing the root system. When placing the plant in the hole make sure the surface of the plant and soil around match. Press it down lightly into the hole to ensure there is good contact between the root ball and the soil. Fill in the cracks with soil and mulch the base. Raspberries do not generally require a whole lot of winter protection however the mulch will help retain moisture and will break down over time providing nutrients. The final step is give it a good water slow deep watering. keep this up until freeze up and snow cover. Although raspberries are very drought resistant after disturbing the root system they will need a little extra attention. Next year water the raspberries like you would any annual and you should be good. Some of my favorite childhood memories are of gardening with my parents and brothers. This channel is about low cost organic urban gardening in zone 3. I am by no means an expert gardener however I love to share my experiments and journey garden year round. Please feel free to join the conversation and if you think you might like this channel subscribe. Have a great day! Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Setting up a Basic Indoor Grow Room
 
04:22
Much like the garden outside growing indoors does not have to be complex nor expensive. In order to enjoy gardening inside you will need three things, Soil, Light and Seeds. What is the best potting mix What kind of light do you need to grow food indoors What kinds of plants can you grow during the winter Indoor Growing Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH0sQIoFdcU2VYPdR9HYRVDz Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden/
How to Prune Tomatoes to Increase Yields , Prevent Disease and Ripen Fruit Faster
 
05:38
Have you ever wondered: What is the difference between a pruned and unpruned tomato plant? What is the difference between an determinant and indeterminate tomato plant? How to support your tomato plants using a trellis. What is a tomato sucker? How to prune a tomato sucker How to clone tomatoes Preventing diseases like blight in tomatoes. Why do you top tomatoes? How to ripen tomatoes faster on the vine Why I prune my tomatoes Related Videos How to Build and Electrical Conduit Trellis: https://youtu.be/TIrEaq49iXQ Is Epsom Salt Beneficial in Organic Gardening? https://youtu.be/DaCVoCnzav8 How to Grow Organic Heirloom Tomatoes Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH0tCKD7yNY9rCbLClEZWrpv Starting Tomato Seedlings - Getting a head start on your Heirloom Open Pollinated Seedlings https://youtu.be/scnSA81NDEs  How to Grow Large Crops of Tomatoes Using Free Fertilizers: https://youtu.be/MALtBw7bl38 Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Fall Pruning Fruit Trees for Beginners
 
03:54
Fruit trees are a wonderful way to grow food with little effort in your yard. With a little care they can produce large harvests for decades. The only real work I put into my fruit trees is a little pruning. Pruning will help keep the tree healthy preventing damage and maximizing the yields. In my opinion it also improves how the tree looks in my yard. My general philosophy is to prune on an ongoing basis. I hope to avoid large prunes all at once. How to Prune Fruit Bearing Trees https://youtu.be/YEl_fBVA1PE?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH2zbHVmcbp8if3JJf25D7jt Fruit Tree Grafting for Beginners: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH2zbHVmcbp8if3JJf25D7jt
Is Wood Ash Safe to use in a Vegetable Garden?
 
05:45
Throughout the course of our testing garden assumptions series I have been asked a number of times about the use of wood ash as a soil amendment in vegetable gardens. This interested me as often I will add the ash from my small fire pit into my compost as it is something that I have seen family do in the past. Today I thought I would look into the practice to see if using wood ash has benefit in the garden while diverting it from landfill. Today’s general hypothesis is that Wood ash has benefit when used in a vegetable garden. In order to understand this issue a little more we will need to ask some much more specific questions Is wood ash a fertilizer? Will wood ash change the pH of my soil Is wood ash a fertilizer? The University of Wisconsin Extensions produced a information bulletin on the use of wood ash as an agricultural amendment and substitute for lime. In their research the sampled 16 ash samples from local sources and found 12 of the 15 commonly tested for elements that are essential or beneficial for plant growth. Notably there were significant concentrations of Calcium, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Potassium all nutrients required by plants in higher concentrations. They also noted some other elements that could become toxic however their concentrations are low enough to represent what you would expect to find in most soils naturally. It would seem that wood ash does have value as a fertilizer however most notably it is missing nitrogen which is lost during the burning process. Regardless there are many studies evaluating the use of wood ash and correlating over many years to increased production of commercial crops. This proves to be most effective in acidic soils when the researchers were growing forage crops for livestock that grow best in neutral or slightly alkaline soils. This leads us to the next question will wood ash change the pH of garden soils? Wood ash is very effective at increasing the pH of soils. Many sources site the use of wood ash as a replacement for lime in agricultural practices. The purpose of which is to raise the pH often from acidic conditions to a near neutral pH of 7. This is done to bring the soil pH into the optimal range for the crop. Having the pH of the soil close to optimal allows the crop to access the available nutrients resulting in higher yields. Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Installing a Rain Barrel for Beginners
 
09:41
Rain barrels are a great way to improve the sustainability of your garden. Capturing rain not only helps you get through periods with no rain but helps save money on your water bill. Today I am going to go through how I installed my rain barrel system. You can purchase rain barrels from most big box stores however most product reviews complain of leaks and poorly functional systems. For this reason I have decided to build my own. Selecting a location for a rain barrel is important. What you want to think of is ease of access for use in your garden but the catchment area of the roof. I selected a down spout in my back yard that has a catchment of about 1/3 of my roof. This should allow me to catch a good amount of water even if the rain is light. 0:05 Why I built a Rain Barrel 0:48 Building a Concrete Platform 2:32 Converting to Rain Barrels 4:02 Installing Taps and Connectors 5:26 Installing Barrel Connectors 7:14 Installing Downspout Diverter 0:26 Bug Netting 9:06 Winterizing Rain Barrels Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden/
Is Pressure Treated Wood Harmful to use in the Garden?
 
05:03
When selecting wood to make raised beds often people will recommend avoiding pressure treated wood siting the preservatives may be harmful. In this month’s installment of our testing garden assumptions series I thought I would put this to the test. Dead wood if left to the elements will decompose. If the wood has been used in a raised bed it is probably not favourable to have the bed decay quickly. There are two solutions to this. The use of a hard wood or cedar will slow the decay process but in most areas these woods cost a lot. Alternatively more common lumber can be treated and preserved in order to slow the decay process. In recent decades the three most common treatment processes include Creosote, Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) and Alkaline Copper Quaternary (ACQ). Both Creosote and CCA were abandoned in 2003 voluntarily by industry in North America for the sale to the general public. This was done as there were concerns over the hazard of hydrocarbons and heavy metals used to preserve the wood. [1] [8] ACQ treatment remains available in most lumber yards. Our hypothesis today is that pressure treated wood may be harmful if used to build a garden. ACQ treated lumber is most commonly used residentially. The method uses Copper with and an companying biocide to help resist the decay process. Lets take a look at both biocides and copper to see if they are potentially harmful in a garden. Biocides are any chemical or microorganism that deters harmful organisms. Biocides are used in medicine, agriculture and industry such as forestry. Most commonly in pressure treated wood the biocide is DDAC Didecyldimethylammonium chloride. [7] It is also commonly used as a disinfectant for surgeries and restaurants. When tested for leaching in an extreme environment researchers showed leaching results into the environment between 0.19 and 0.22% well below the industry allowable standard of 4% [4]These extreme conditions were designed to facilitate leaching and are highly unlikely to be replicated in your back yard garden. References: [1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wood_preservation [2] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23295179 [3] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Didecyldimethylammonium_chloride [4] http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/es0493603 [5] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copper_toxicity [6] http://ceqg-rcqe.ccme.ca/download/en/263 [7] http://www.epa.gov/oppad001/reregistration/cca/acq.htm [8] http://www.epa.gov/ttnatw01/hlthef/cresols.html [9] http://soils.wisc.edu/facstaff/barak/soilscience326/listofel.htm
Freezing Cold Leaf Based Winter Compost
 
01:53
Easy Leaf Based Compost: http://youtu.be/p9SxObuNMT0 With freezing temperatures and snow settling in for the winter your compost is done working right? Nope even though it has been -40 our compost is still going strong. Although outside might be brisk the inside of your compost pile is nice and hot. The bacteria responsible for breaking down the green and brown materials in your hot compost. produce heat as a waste product. As long as your pile is large enough the trillions of bacteria will continue to work away. As they do the pile will get smaller. This is a great opportunity to continue to add to the pile. Today we are adding some used coffee grounds and tea leaves, spoiled leafy greens, egg shells and the pulp from strawberries and rhubarb that have come out of the brewery. These are all good nitrogen rich materials. Top it off with some more fall leaves we have tucked away in the shed and the pile will continue to work well into the winter. Later on in the winter if you don't add more oxygen or raw materials the pile will cool off once the majority of the active decomposition has finished. the freeze thaw cycle will continue to break things down until the spring when a quick turn will send the pile right back into a hot compost finishing off the process. I hope you enjoyed this quick episode on winter composting. For a more detailed discussion on creating a leaf based hot compost check out our episode by clicking on the screen or finding the link in the description below. Some of my favorite childhood memories are of gardening with my parents and brothers. This channel is about low cost organic urban gardening in zone 3. I am by no means an expert gardener however I love to share my experiments and journey garden year round. Please feel free to join the conversation and if you think you might like this channel subscribe. Have a great day! Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
How to Overwinter Red Wiggler Composting Worms in your Garden
 
04:48
Composting worms are the engine that drives the nutrient cycle in my garden. They eat organic material in my garden helping to break it down releasing plant available nutrients, beneficial microbes and plant growth hormone. Today I am going to talk to you about how I over winter red wigglers in my garden so they can continue to drive the nutrient cycle year after year without needing to be re-introduced. [1] Red Wiggler Facts http://redwigglersupply.ca/worm-facts/ [2] Cold Hardiness of Worm Cocoons http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00354083 [3] Insulation properties of soil http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/pdf/10.4141/cjss76-060
How to Build a Simple Teepee Trellis
 
02:43
You can greatly increase the amount of food you can grow in the same space by taking advantage of the vertical area in your garden. For vining crops like Melons and Cucumbers I love to use Simple Teepee Trellis. Today I show you how I install these cheap and effective trellis in my garden. They can even be used for indeterminate tomatoes! How to Grow Melons in Colder Climates: https://youtu.be/tz_pme2Hddc 10 Easy Tips to Grow More Food in Small Gardens: https://youtu.be/KRBPgnYBsZs?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH0wwN-9IQ--WX-C-4JqTR-7 Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden/
Build Amazing Fertile Garden Soil Using Free and Local Resources in your Mulch or Compost
 
04:58
How to build soil fertility for the perfect garden soil for free! It is fall here in Alberta and that means the summer crops are done and some of the garden beds are done for the year. Just because there is nothing goring in some of these beds does not mean you can’t be getting ready for next season. Today I am going to show you how I continue to build soil fertility over the winter with free and local resources. Mulching garden beds is a great practice to help build your soil fertility. Compost Probably the best thing to mulch with is finished compost. The nutrients are immediately available for the nutrient cycle and it usually comes with a high concentration of beneficial bacteria and organisms like earth worms that will help break down the other mulch materials. Generally I simply lay it on top in a 2-3 cm or 1 inch layer after having pulled back any undecomposed mulch material. I don’t mix it in so that I don’t damage any of the beneficial organisms like fungi in the soil. Autumn Leaves Autumn leaves are a great resource that quite literally falls from the sky. They have a wide variety of trace elements and carbon. In fact of the 15 commonly tested for beneficial and essential elements autumn leaves have 11/15. When broken down they add these nutrients to the nutrient cycle and the carbon material adds humus that retains water and provides habitat for soil born beneficial organisms. I usually add a thick layer to the garden as it will help insulate the soil from the harshest winter temperatures. By spring the volume will have decreased as it decomposes. The one thing autumn leaves don’t have a lot of is Nitrogen for this we will need to turn to some other resources you generate in the kitchen Used Coffee Grounds and Tea Leaves Used coffee grounds and tea leaves are often tossed in the trash but they are a valuable resource to add to the garden. When I analyzed coffee grounds in the testing garden assumptions series videos I found they had a total NPK of 2.05-0.2979-0.7469 with a hand full of trace elements. Used Tea leaves also have an impressive total NPK of 4.15-0.62 -0.4 doubling the nitrogen and phosphorus of used coffee grounds [1] Tea leaves also have 12 of 15 elements making them a valuable addition to the mulch. I usually sprinkle them directly on top of the autumn leaves making sure not to apply more than a cm or ½ inch to any one area. If over applied they can slow the decomposition process. Not only can you take materials that would otherwise become trash but you can literally grow your own fertilizer on site. Comfrey Comfrey is a plant that sends down a deep taproot to and is able to collect nutrients from the mineral layer and bring it to the surface as a part of its leaves. I use the leaves as a part of my mulch layer helping to deposit those nutrients where the garden plants can use them. Comfrey has a total NPK of 3.7-1.2-8.43 and it contains all 15 of the 15 commonly tested for essential and beneficial elements. Eggshells Eggshells are commonly added to my mulch layer as well. They are over 40% calcium that is immediately plant available when released from the shell. Eggshells also have a wide variety of elements including nitrogen. They have 9/15 elements tested for and most importantly have significant quantities of Selenium which is often not in other free and local resources. Eggshells are easy to add to the mulch layer. I usually let them dry out in my shed for a few months. This will help reduce any potential for harmful bacterial to colonize. Once dry and brittle I crush the shells roughly and simply sprinkle on the mulch layer. Hot Compost If you are applying mulch to an area near a live plant make sure not to apply too thick of a layer of these mulch materials. When combine in larger quantities they can and will create a hot compost that can damage root systems. Cover Crops, Wood Ash and Urine When combine and used in a mulch layer or in the creation of compost these free and local resources often have more than enough nutrients allowing you to grow healthy organic vegetables year after year. If combine with other free and local methods such as cover crops, wood ash and human urine I am confident anyone can have a product free garden that produces healthy organic crops. If you would like more information on the materials above make sure to check out the Testing Garden Assumptions Series [2] where I take a look at garden Methods, Practices and Products to see if they are supported by science. The videos that are published the first Friday of the month have taken an in depth look at the materials we used today and they are supported. [1] "The Truth about Garden Remedies" by Jeff Gillman (2008) p. 41 [2] Testing Garden Assumptions Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH3UTGH_3UAG6cB8NnlO8M1U
Espalier Apple Tree How to Plant and Trellis for Small Space Gardens
 
06:03
Espalier is an ancient method of shaping a woody plant to fit certain spaces. Traditionally these are fruit producing trees and they are shaped using trellis and support to fit into a two dimensional space. It is a great method to fit fruiting trees in small spaces such as against a building or fence. Apples require two varieties to cross pollinate each other. Often it is sufficient to have an apple tree in the neighborhood. In my case there is more than one variety of apples on the same tree. This is done through a process called grafting, where a bud or scion from your desired fruit is attached or grafted to another tree. Grafting is most commonly done with different varieties of the same crop however it can be done with plants of the same family. For instance I have successfully grafted a pear scion to an apple tree. Unfortunately your chances for success are low if you are crossing fruit tree families like stone fruits with apples or pears. Espalier fruit trees are becoming more and more common to the point where I found mine at a local big box store and it has two of my wife’s favourite eating apple varieties. You can do it on your own as well using pruning and training methods. If you start from a juvenile plant it will take a few years to train and during that time fruit production will be low. When planting an espalier tree you will need to think about sun exposure and the supports the tree will need over time. Most fruit trees are require full sun. Make sure to select an area you can support the tree and that gets more than 6-8 hours of direct sunlight in the summer. Usually in store they are unsupported however when the plant has a crop on it and gets larger you will want and need that support to prevent damage and continue to train the shape. I will be planting the tree just over 30cm or 12 inches from the fence as I will be extending the trellis that far out from the fence to provide the plant room to grow and easy airflow. When planting perennials it is important to give them a good home. In my hard clay I will dig the hole 1.5x – 2x larger than the container diameter and 1.5x deeper. This will give us space to add lose compost that will allow the plant to push roots while providing it nutrients until it is established. I usually fill the remainder of the hole with compost however you can mix in your native soil if you do not have enough compost. It is important that the trellis supports match the existing branch levels. In order to do this I will build the trellis after I have dug the hole but before I finish planting the tree. Dry fitting the tree in the hole will help me set the heights for the supports and leaving the hole open allows us to make final adjustments. I start by attaching two 2”x6” 10 feet apart vertically on the fence. Making sure they are level before attaching them. I use one screw in top and one on bottom to allow for adjustments. Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Preserve Garden Fruit and Vegetables 4 Easy Methods
 
03:58
With summer coming to an end here in Zone 3 I usually find myself awash with crops. We continue to enjoy harvests as a part of our meals however there is more now than we can eat fresh. In order to support my ongoing goal save money by producing my own food I am in the full swing of preserving so we can continue to enjoy garden produce over the winter months. Today I thought I would go through some of the methods we use to preserve crops from the garden. Grape Jam Recipe: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/09/concord-grape-jam-recipe-grape-jelly.html Grape Jelly Recipe: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/35158/concord-grape-jelly/ Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden/
CFL or Flourescent Grow Lights What You Need to Know to Buy and Build the Best Grow Operation
 
05:29
There are tons of options when it comes to grow lights. From the expensive high tech to the lower costing shop lights it really depends on what you are trying to get out of your lights. Generally I will use my system to grow seedlings to get a head start on the summer. For this Fluorescent or CFL bulbs are more than sufficient. As a bonus I have been able to grow hot pepper and cherry tomatoes indoors under these lights. Today I am going to go through quickly how I select and purchase my lights and how to install them into our shelf system. What is the best Florescent light for an indoor grow operation? Is a T8 bulb better than T12 for growing plants? Do Lumens Matter? How many Watts do I need to grow plants? What is a Kelven rating and which one do I need to grow plants? What light ballast or fixture should I get? How to install Grow lights on a shelf. How much did this grow light system cost? Indoor Growing Playlist [1] http://www.usa.philips.com/e/led-lighting/warm-white-led-lighting.html Grow Lights Explained CFL LED and HPS: https://youtu.be/CU3NhvUusp4?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH0sQIoFdcU2VYPdR9HYRVDz How to Grow Plants using CFL or Florescent Lights: https://youtu.be/g2UZc1j0rkc?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH0sQIoFdcU2VYPdR9HYRVDz Indoor Growing Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH0sQIoFdcU2VYPdR9HYRVDz References: [1] Light Colour to Kelven rating: http://www.usa.philips.com/e/led-lighting/warm-white-led-lighting.html [2] Fluorescent Lights Info Sheet https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorescent-lamp_formats [3] Wavelengths of light care of Popular Mechanics http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/gadgets/reviews/g164/incandescent-vs-compact-fluorescent-vs-led-ultimate-light-bulb-test/ [4] Visible Light Diagram care of inda-gro.com http://www.inda-gro.com/IG/?q=node/53 [5] Additional information on bulbs http://www.waynesthisandthat.com/fluorescent.html [6] Photo Credit Chlorophyl absorption peaks http://pinklightaeroponics.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Photosynthesis-Absorption-Spectrum.gif Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
How to Build a Wood Raised Bed Garden for Beginners Simple and Easy EZ
 
07:32
Raised beds are a great way to garden and with an small investment in a bed this size you can grow food for years to come while helping to save your family some of your hard earned money. 0:32 Where do you place your raised bed. 0:56 Simple Raised Bed Design 1:45 Materials list 1:58 How to build a cheap raised bed. 3:41 Using mulch to kill off grass and fertilize your soil. 4:20 How to cheaply fill the raised bed 6:28 Building Amazing Soil for Free using Mulch 6:45 How much this project cost Related Episodes: How to Build a raised bed on a slope: https://youtu.be/X5xZgiibypc Raised Bed Gardening For Beginners: Where to place your Garden: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH3OKJ_4uS9u-wTKw0waKQqJ Urban Gardening Series Playlist: Grow More Food at Home: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH0wwN-9IQ--WX-C-4JqTR-7 Build Amazing Fertile Garden Soil Using Mulch: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH2W285QZm4mdsdKo6l98zRK Turn Waste into Garden Gold using Worm Castings: https://youtu.be/ORu_mdB7cng Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden/
How to Brew Hard Apple Cider from Start to Finish Using Apples
 
06:57
Starting hard apple cider from apples you have grown yourself does not have to be difficult. We are going to take you from start to finish. For a full recipe please visit www.albertaurbangarden.ca If you would like to see our 2013 Hard Apple Cider Video check it out at the following link: http://youtu.be/F3JnJVJdxfQ Some of my favorite childhood memories are of gardening with my parents and brothers. This channel is about low cost organic urban gardening in zone 3. I am by no means an expert gardener however I love to share my experiments and journey garden year round. Please feel free to join the conversation and if you think you might like this channel subscribe. Have a great day! Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Can Human Urine be used as a Fertilizer in your Organic Garden
 
05:37
Can you use Human Urine as Fertilizer? On today’s episode I am going to take a look at one of the questions I have been asked a few times now.  Can you use human urine as fertilizer? can urine transmit diseases? Can there be drugs in urine? Other benefits of urine as a fertilizer Background on the subject From the dawn of agriculture and the domestication of animals we have used other animals manures and urines in agriculture as a means to return essential nutrients to the soil allowing for increased crop yields later. On this month’s instalment of the testing garden assumptions series let’s take a look at the use of human urine in the garden and if it brings any benefits. Hypothesis Today’s Hypothesis is that Human Urine can be used as a fertilizer in the garden. Research In order to understand this better we need to know what fertilizer potential urine has and if it poses a risk to human health if used in the garden. Results with general findings Is Urine a Fertilizer Urine is the liquid waste stream produced by filtering the blood stream in the kidneys.  Commonly urine is high in nitrogen along with other surplus water soluble elements found in your body. a 2005 study from Goteborg university in Sweden assessed the recycling of nutrients excreted in urine from urban areas as a a method of ecologically sustainable development. They found that straight urine has an NPK of 18:2:5 while urine flushed with water has 15:1:3.  The study went on to find macro and micro-elements essential for plant growth including Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni, Pb and Cd. Urine can have a pH between 4.6 to 8 however garden soils usually have sufficient buffering capacity to avoid a change in the pH. So there is research to support that urine does have value as a fertilizer and is unlikely to be able to change the pH of your soil. The next thing we should take a look at is if urine is safe to use in the garden. Is Urine Safe to Use in the Garden In order to understand if urine is safe we should know if it contains anything that may be harmful if someone comes in contact. The first thing that comes to mind is bacteria that may be harmful. Photo Credit www.coalphotography.com http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/08/what-is-in-pee-urine-chemistry_n_3880868.html http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/from-gunpowder-to-teeth-whitener-the-science-behind-historic-uses-of-urine-442390/?no-ist
How I use Permaculture Principals to Grow More Food my Small Garden
 
05:17
I have used some of the concepts and principles in permaculture to build my garden and the practices I use. Central to my gardening methods are the principals of permanent agriculture through the use of perennials [2] and sustainable methods of food production [3]. Many of the principles I use in my garden are inspired by Masanobu Fukuoka the author of The One-Straw Revolution and his do-nothing farming where by one grows food with the least amount of effort while avoiding the use of manufactured inputs. Many of you have already heard this already on my good friend Patrick’s channel in fact the method and book inspired his channel’s name One Yard Revolution. [4] Today I am going to go through how I have implemented some of these principals in my garden and working to research and test the methods and practices to see if science supports their use. I started in gardening much like many of you. I wanted to garden organically so I purchased organic products and followed methods similar to conventional large scale farming. Following a number of conversations with my parents, grandparents and finally the YouTube community I was inspired to investigate the principals of sustainable gardening and was interested to see if it could be done in my northern growing zone. As I began investigating these principles I liked the idea that this method of food production was more environmentally friendly while producing more food than I was able to previously. I did find abandoning practices I had used for years tough. When abandoning a practice I was worried the new method would lead to a failure and I would lose the crop for the year. In order to help the transition I started by testing the new method on a small patch to see what happened. I started adding perennials to the garden. This took a few years and some planning to maximize the use of the space I have dedicated to this. I took roughly equal shares between annual beds, trial beds and perennial beds. The central beds are dedicated to annuals with the trial beds immediately adjacent and the perennial beds on the perimeter. To date I have added 33 varieties of 12 different crops and continue to look for other crops to add in including this rhubarb plant that my parents took from their patch to bring to me. In order to produce as much food as possible in a sustainable method I have organized my plants by size and nutritional requirements. I have chosen to plant larger trees and shrubs outside of the garden directly in my native soil. Their extensive root networks often extending 1.5 – 2x larger than the diameter of the tree are able to seek out and find the nutrients they require. This allows me to plant them in areas Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Fruit Tree Grafting for Beginners
 
07:34
Last week I spoke about how who I plan my orchard of food producing perennials. Near the end of that video I spoke about the fact that you can increase the number of varieties you have through a process called grafting without having to plant another tree. Today I am going to go through collecting and graft new varieties to my existing plants. There are plenty of grafting techniques with including, Whip, Cleft, Side, Bud and Bridge graft. Before I do any grafting I like to research the techniques just to make sure I am refreshed. Sites like the University of Minnesota do a great job outlining the methods. [1] 0:37 Combination Fruit Trees 1:10 Grafting with in the Family 1:31 Definition of Rootstock and Scion wood 1:41 When the rootstock plant is ready 2:06 Scion harvest and storage 3:04 Grafting Tools 3:24 Grafting techniques 3:41 When is the best time to Graft 3:55 Cleft Graft Technique 6:07 What is a Bud Graft 6:24 Successful Graft and Time to fruiting 7:00 Benefits of grafting (fertilization, varieties, harvest time) Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden/ [1] University of Minnesota Grafting Resources Site: http://www.extension.umn.edu/garden/yard-garden/fruit/grafting-and-budding-fruit-trees/ Related Episodes Grow More Food with Perennial Fruit and Nut Bushes, Vines and Trees https://youtu.be/fgQZNpZf0CQ?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH0wwN-9IQ--WX-C-4JqTR-7 Grow an Espalier Style Apple Tree. Perfect for Small Space Orchards https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH2zbHVmcbp8if3JJf25D7jt
How to Grow Melons Vertically in Colder Climates
 
06:32
In this complete guide to melon growing in low zones we will go through growing watermelons, cantaloupe and honeydew melons from start to finish. where do plant melons? What do melons need? Do melons need heat? Can you grow melons on Compost? how to fertilize melons how to use a hoop house. how to built a teepee trellis. Can you transplant melon seedlings? what variety of melons works best in Canada? How can you tell when a melon is ready to harvest? Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Grow Lights Explained CFL LED and HPS easy and cheap to efficient and expensive
 
11:22
For the full Transcript go to http://www.albertaurbangarden.ca/2014/11/16/cfl-and-florescent-lights-growing-indoors-cheap-easy-and-effective/ References are below I chose to use CFL bulbs in my house for a number of reasons. Bulbs with excellent wavelengths for plant growth can easily found hardware stores so finding a specialty shop or ordering online is not necessary in most areas. The light fixtures are either fairly cheap or the bulbs can be used in house hold fixtures. The fixtures for CFL are often long tubes allowing you to easily fit more plants under them. Having individual light gives me the flexibility to us what I need when I need it optimizing power consumption They also don’t put off a tone of heat allowing you to operate more lights if you desire without having to worry about heat issues. The initial investment is lower than the other lighting technologies for instance both of these combine cost me just over 50$. Because these set ups hold fewer watts of bulbs their power consumption is much lower. Even though some of the other technologies are more power efficient they typically come in single units that consume larger volumes of power. The lower energy output makes it much easier to start your seedlings and tender plants inside. Some of the larger systems can cause issues with your seedlings most often related to heat output. One of the downfalls of using these CFL bulbs is you generally cant produce full size things like tomatoes and peppers. They will still fruit if you chose medium and small bodied fruit but not to the same density as the same plants outside or under the more costly systems. If your looking for light systems for starting seedlings and lower energy plant growth inside during the winter I recommend simple CFL systems. With higher energy systems you can get closer to producing your favorite Tomato or Citrus tree inside during the LONG COLD WINTER On the next episode in this series we are going to go through the basics of growing inside. Click here to go to the Indoor Growing Playlist. Thank you for spending time with me today. I appreciate it very much! I hope you have a fantastic day! A special thanks to Hydro-Lite in Edmonton www.hydro-lite.com Wavelengths http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wavelength Absorption for Photosynthesis http://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=1668 Absorption Spectrum Chlorophyll A and B (Photo) http://pinklightaeroponics.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Photosynthesis-Absorption-Spectrum.gif Lumes vs Wavelength http://www.sunmastergrowlamps.com/SunmLightandPlants.html Kelvin Light Chart and Comparison between light technologies http://theaquaponicsource.com/how-to-aquaponics/indoor-aquaponics-grow-lights/ Light Technology Comparison Chart http://www.designrecycleinc.com/led%20comp%20chart.html CFL Lights http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_fluorescent_lamp History of HPS http://americanhistory.si.edu/lighting/20thcent/invent20.htm LED http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light-emitting_diode Philips LED Discovery http://www.news.com.au/technology/philips-says-new-led-light-bulb-is-more-efficient-greener-than-fluorescent-lighs/story-e6frfro0-1226618661621 SunBlaster Wavelength Chart http://sunblasterlighting.com/index.php
The Top 5 Garden Myths.  Advice that is not Correct and Why!
 
06:26
Do Pine Needles Make Soil Acidic? Does old coffee acidify your soil? Is Pressure Treated Lumber ok to use in the Garden? Does the Chlorine in Tap Water Harm Beneficial Bacteria in soil? Is Epsom Salt useful in organic gardening? Testing Garden Assumptions Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH3UTGH_3UAG6cB8NnlO8M1U Top 5 Garden Myths Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH2COKdm8QkUv9TYWzWG8imu Next Years Testing Garden Assumptions Often I have found that you are suggesting videos based on marketing claims made about products. While often there is a seed of truth that a clever marketing team has woven into a products claims and advertisements the science we discuss on the first Friday of every month helps cut through the noise. If you would like to check out in more detail any of the subjects we spoke about today or other topics I have addressed in this series make sure to check out the Testing Garden Assumptions Playlist at the end of this video. Next year I am going to take a look at the claims made about compost tea, compost extractions, and the claim that soils need to be remineralized among many other subjects. So keep the suggestions coming and Ill keep working on putting garden practices methods and products to the test! Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Cover Crops as Green Manure Improve your Soil EZ and Cheap in the Alberta Urban Garden
 
04:39
On todays episode we are going to talk about Green manure or cover crops. Even though it is nice and warm outside it is time in Zone 3 to start thinking about the fall. As such we have a great opportunity to continue to build our soil helping both the plants this year and for years to come. Our first frost typically occurs in the last September or early October. going forward in we will simply refer to them as cover crops. when selecting cover crops you want to select species that fix nitrogen such as peas, clover or help keep weeks or disease at bay such as mustard, This practice is once of the great re-discovered pieces of old farm knowledge. cover crops serves a number of functions. It covers the soil preventing wind erosion and water loss through evaporation while fixing nitrogen by building the soils beneficial microbe populations. when the plants are killed it releases the nitrogen and provides more organic material further improving the soil and the beneficial organisms in the soil. When selecting a good green manure crop its important to start with nitrogen fixing or preventative disease fighting plants. Nitrogen fixing plants form a symbiotic relationship with bacteria that fix atmospheric nitrogen to more bio available forms. In return the bacteria get nutrients from the plant. disease fighting plants act in a number of ways typically pushing away or simply not attracting garden pests. You can use green manures any time of the growing season as long as you leave at least 6-8 weeks prior to killing the crop. Any shorter of a time will not allow you to get the best results. In my case I began with peas when I initially filled the beds and planted my perennials. you can plant cover crops in open patches of your garden or in-between already established crops allowing them to do their work during and after your crop is in there. in open areas I chose to use a little bit of potting soil to cover the severely degraded mulch layers and some used coffee grounds to give a little bit of plant available nutrition but to also attract the native earth worms and my red wigglers that are living in the area. They will bring more beneficial bacteria to further enhance the soil. In my case I have selected three varieties for my garden. I will be adding them to new garden beds around my new perennials. This should not only help my perennials but prepare the soil for next years companion crops in the same beds. I have selected two nitrogen fixing plants and one disease fighting plant. Winter field Peas, White dutch clover and White Mustrard. for the best results with any nitrogen fixing cover crop it is best to get an inoculate to cover the seeds in. This inoculate provides the nitrogen fixing bacteria directly where they will be needed. in my case I ordered too late in the season and was not able to get any. instead I used actively aerated compost tea containing compost and garden soil that already have these bacteria found in them. By creating the compost tea and watering in the seeds with it the bacteria should be there ready for the cover crops to sprout. over the next 6-8 weeks i will keep an eye on these plants. when they begin to flower they will either be killed by our first few frosts or I will chop and drop them prior to going to seed. Thank you very much for spending time with me today I appreciate it very much. I hope you have a fantastic day! Some of my favorite childhood memories are of gardening with my parents and brothers. This channel is about low cost organic urban gardening in zone 3. I am by no means an expert gardener however I love to share my experiments and journey garden year round. Please feel free to join the conversation and if you think you might like this channel subscribe. Have a great day! Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Raised Bed Gardening For Beginners. Site Selection, Organic Soil and Mulch
 
08:39
Its that time of year that people get inspired to start their first gardens. With all the information out there where do you even start? Today ill go through the basics in getting your first garden going starting by going through location selection, raised bed construction, garden soil and mulching. Location location location! It is really important to make sure you place your first garden in a good location. So how do you figure out where a good location for your garden is? Although the summer solstice is still a few months away the sun this time of year is going to give you some hints of where to place your garden. This is less of a concern if you have a wide open area but if your in an city like I am there are plenty of things that can obstruct the sun. on a sunny day take a three or four photos of you yard. This will let you know where the sun is hitting and where it is being shaded. If you dont have an area that in most of the photos is sunny take a look for structures, fences and trees to the south of the are in your yard that is the closest to the North of you property. If your not sure where North and South are most smart phones have a built in compass. remember that although structures on the south side of your yard are causing the shadow right now the sun will pass higher in the sky during the summer reducing the extend of the shadowing. So look for an area that is shaded now however when the length of the shadow is reduced in summer may become exposed to sunlight. Another good indicator if you live in an area that is snow covered through out the winter is where the snow melts first. This is indicative of where the sun is able to concentrate its melting. In my yard during the winter as the sun crosses the sky quite low and my house shades the garden most of the day however with the sun higher in the sky it gets 12-14 hours of direct sun. optimally the area you pick should have a minimum of 6-8 hours of direct sunlight. With my short season more is better. in southern climates closer to the equator you may in fact want to make sure you do get some shade as the summer sun is much more intense. From what I understand its best to select areas that shade part of the afternoon sun. If at all possible place your garden as near to a entrance on an south facing wall of your home that has limited obstructions. If close to your door you it will be easier to enjoy your garden and the house will reflect heat and protect your plants. You have now identified an area and your look for a specific spot. When selecting your spot make sure that it optimally has clear access all around it and has a slight slope away to provide drainage. Don't worry if your yard has a slope like mine. You can still build a raised bed its just going to take a little longer. if you are in the southern hemisphere make sure to flip the instructions for North vs. South. Now that you know where to put your garden its time to decide how big of an area you want. I recommend starting with a 4 foot by 8 foot area or 1.2 meters by 2.4 meters raised bed garden. Most people can reach 2 feet or 60 cm and with the easy access on all sides you should be able to reach everywhere in the garden with out having to step on the soil. Now that you have an area marked out and a size selected its time to figure out how you want to garden. I generally recommend new gardeners start with a raised beds. I think it is important to have a successful first year in order to inspire you to continue this great hobby. Raise beds have a number of benefits over in ground gardening that just make it a little easier to have a good year. Some of the benefits of raised beds include better control of the soil, the chance for fewer weeds and the potential for fewer soil issues. I do realize getting started does cost a little more but I personally feel its worth the investment. Moving forward raised bed gardening does not have to cost a lot. its time to build your garden beds. around the perimeter of my garden area I have selected built them from 2 2x6 or one 2 x 8 or 12. I tried to use as much as possible reclaimed wood so the depth varies. All you really need is 6-8 inches of depth. Raised beds are fairly easy to put together. here I have used a 4x4 post in the corner to screw the planks too. Again I try to source scrap material as much as possible. wood working corner brackets work fine as well. in my main beds I used 4x4 and 4x6 posts. These are more expensive however as I dont have access all the way around the garden beds and I needed to be able to walk on the frame. The 4 inch surface instead of the 2 inch surface makes it easer and stronger. The posts are much simpler to attach together. you can simply pre drill and screw them directly to each other.
How to Make your own Organic Mint Tea
 
02:05
Mint tea is one of my favorite hot drinks to enjoy on cold rainy days or in the depths of winter. Today I thought I would show you how I grow, make and enjoy my own Organic Mint Tea. Mint is a relatively easy plant to grow. So easy in fact it can become invasive in a hurry! I grow my mint in containers to help keep the plants from taking over my garden. I have my mint planted in a mixture of soil predominantly made of compost. The compost will provide more than enough nutrients for the mint to grow for years to come. This compost is made with nothing more than free and local resources that were generated on my property. I grow a number of different varieties including spearmint, chocolate mint and pepper mint. Each of them brings a unique flavour that when combine provides a beautiful mint flavour in the tea. When the plants are 20 cm or 9 inches tall I cut them half way. Leaving half of the stem will allow the mint to regrow often at a more intense pace. After harvest you can make tea right away simply by pouring boiling water over the leaves and letting it steep. I however like to save my tea for the winter when I am really missing the warmth of the garden. In order to do this I dry the leaves using a dehydrator. If you have a dry enough climate you can hang dry the leaves. I usually run the dehydrator overnight. I know when the leaves are done drying when they are brittle when picked up and easily break apart. Once the batch is done I use a dry container that seals. I place the leaves in the container pressing down to compact and break apart the tea as I go. I store these containers on top of my refrigerator as it is dry, warm and directly adjacent to my kettle. If you are worried you did not get all of the moisture out of the tea you can also store it in a freezer however I recommend using a vacuumed sealed container to prevent any additional humidity from entering the tea leaves. When your done make sure to recycle the used tea leaves in your garden mulch. To find out why check out the testing garden assumptions series video where we take a look at used tea leaves. Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Comfrey an Organic Fertilizer and Mineral Accumulator you can Grow at Home
 
06:22
Commonly comfrey is cultivated for two uses and promoted by growing methods like Permaculture. Comfrey is often used in organic gardening as a fertilizer and mineral accumulator. Lab Results: http://www.albertaurbangarden.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/150214_AlbertaUrbanGardenCertificateofAnalysis-RevisedReport.pdf Comfrey is a common perennial herb native to Europe that grows in damp areas such as river banks. I was first introduced to comfrey when a viewer gave me a plant. Comfrey is simple to propagate by placing the tuber in the soil and cover, shortly after a leafy plant will emerge. Be careful when planting comfrey or disposing of any extra tubers as they will often re-root and can take over unintended areas and can be hard to get rid of. It is also a good idea to cut and completely remove any of the flowers and their stalks in order to prevent spreading. There is a sterile variety called Bocking 14 Russian Comfrey that you don’t have to worry about the flowers. I planted mine soon after receiving it. I chose to place it in the area I use for making leaf mold. This location is convenient as the pile breaks down it releases nutrients like nitrogen into the surrounding area feeding the plant. The location is out of the way and will not shade any of my food crops. In order to understand better what kind of benefits comfrey has as an organic fertilizer and mineral accumulator I decided to send samples into Maxxam Analytics. I started by drying some of the last comfrey leaves in the fall. I then had the sample tested for immediately available NPK and trace elements. The total immediately available NPK of comfrey is 0.35 – 0.73 – 7.35 These results represent the NPK that is immediately available to plants in the garden soil. This analysis does not account for the nutrients that are tied up in larger more complex molecules. As the comfrey is broken down these nutrients are released into the soils nutrient cycle. The University of Minnesota* [2] assessed the total elemental nitrogen in comfrey samples. Their results ranged from 3.36 % to 3.70%. Our lab results found total phosphorus and potassium of 5300 and 70,000 mg/kg and when converted to % molecular weight the total NPK of comfrey is: 3.7* - 1.21 – 8.43 Comfrey turns out to have a great NPK both immediately available and long term. The second test we had run was the total trace elements. These results will let us know if using comfrey is a good way to add trace elements to our gardens soils. Plants require a variety of elements in the soil in order to complete their life cycle and produce crops. These elements are broken into two categories essential and beneficial. It is rare for garden soils to lack any of these beneficial and essential elements however lower levels can impede the nutrient cycle. Comfrey contains Boron, significant volumes of Calcium*, Iron, Magnesium, Sodium, and Sulphur. Additional elements were reported however due to the low levels and the detection limit error rate the reported numbers are not as reliable however they are still present. These include Manganese, Molynbdenum, Nickel and Zinc. Other literature sources also found Cobalt and Copper. Once the nitrogen phosphorus and potassium have been added to the total these results represent 15 of the 18 essential and beneficial elements that plants take up from the soil. Missing from the analysis is Silicon, selenium, chlorine. Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
4 EZ ways to Organically Enhance your Garden Using Leaves Compost Mulch Mold
 
03:53
4 ways to Organically Enhance your Garden Using Leaves Compost Mulch Mold and more Today we are going to talk about a few ways you can improve your garden soil with fall leaves. Fall leaves are a great source of organic material and the essential trace elements your soil and plants need to thrive. During the fall collected leaves can be used in the following 4 ways. Prior to using the leaves it will significantly help if you break down the leaves using a lawn move, leaf blower set to collect or break them down using your hands. Often you can find bags of pre-shredded leaves on the curb side for collection. Mulching your garden soil will help continue to add organic material while suppressing weed growth and increasing water retention all while suppressing soil borne diseases. Earth worms will eat the mulch further enriching the soil food web. You can mulch any time of year making sure to keep the mulch from making direct contact with live plants during the growing season to prevent disease issues. Hot Compost is one of the fastest ways to enhance your garden soil The compost generated from a hot compost had far fewer diseases and volunteer seeds in it while providing bioavailable nutrients directly to your garden plants. It is simple to do and can be done any time of the year. Simply add roughly equal amounts of green and brown materials by weight or 1-3 ratio of green to brow material by volume. Let sit for 6-9 months over the winter and you should have some fantastic compost. Leaf mold is a much simpler method of using fall leaves to make a beautiful organic soil amendment. Simply pile leaves and keep the pile moist. Unlike a hot compost this process usually takes a year or more however you don’t need to add green material as the leaves will break down on their own. At the end you will end up with a fantastic leaf mold compost can be applied as a mulch or dug into the soil if you wish. Leaf mold is a fungal dominated compost adding humus to soil decreasing compaction and increasing water an nutrient retention. Winter Protection is important to prevent damage to your perennials leaves can be used in a 15cm or 6” layer to help trap air and insulate the soil from harsh winter temperature swings. Simply place the leaves around the base of the plants and leave until spring. In the spring once the threat of drastic drops in temperature has gone simply remove and place in the compost pile or leave a thinner layer of mulch. Alternates to fall leaves include clean or seedless straw or hay, dethatched grass or even shredded news paper This simple organic material is absolute gold for the garden. How do you like to use leaves in your garden? Some of my favorite childhood memories are of gardening with my parents and brothers. This channel is about low cost organic urban gardening in zone 3. I am by no means an expert gardener however I love to share my experiments and journey garden year round. Please feel free to join the conversation and if you think you might like this channel subscribe. Have a great day! Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Inuvik Community Greenhouse Gardening in the Arctic
 
02:39
http://www.inuvikgreenhouse.com/1_2_History.html Today we have a very special episode for you. As you all know I garden in Zone 3 here in the Capital Region of Alberta. Now most people think that I live and garden on the northern reaches of the possible. Well today we are going to travel 1952 kilometres or 1213 miles just about due north to the community of Inuvik in the Northwest Territories. Inuvik sits on the delta of the machenzie river right before it flows into the beauford sea above the arctic circle. Now I know what your thinking this is too far north for gardening right? In fact gardening is well and alive this far north in 1998 the transformation began of an old arena and through innovative design and recycling it was not long until the community garden was producing its first vegetables. The facility is split between public community gardens and a commercial growing operation to cover the costs of operation. The facility not only boasts soil raised beds but hydroponics as well. When you think of growing in the Arctic you are drawn to think of the cold as the limiting factor after all our growing zones are defined by how cold it gets in the winter. Inuvik is firmly in the lowest growing Zone 0 A. This is not a problem in their greenhouse as inuvik enjoys 56 days of 24hour sunlight from late June to august effectively super charging their season. They are able to grow a wide variety of crops from leafy greens to watermelons. The Inuvik Community Greenhouse is a great example of alternate ways we can bring gardening into our lives and a little more food security to our communities. If Inuvik can do it we can all do it! I appreciate you spending time with me. I hope you have a fantastic day! For more information on the Inuvik Community Greenhouse there is a URL in the description below. Some of my favorite childhood memories are of gardening with my parents and brothers. This channel is about low cost organic urban gardening in zone 3. I am by no means an expert gardener however I love to share my experiments and journey garden year round. Please feel free to join the conversation and if you think you might like this channel subscribe. Have a great day! Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Grow a lot of Food in Small Spaces with Container Gardening
 
05:03
Grow a lot of Food in Small Spaces with Container Gardening If you have access to a patio, balcony or deck these small spaces are great for container gardening. Although I have a larger garden I like having crops we use more often close at hand. Before you get going make sure your deck gets direct sunlight for at least part of the day. Typically the best is a deck that face South, West or East should get enough sunlight. I started gardening in containers when I first moved to Alberta. It was a great option for me as I was renting and moved from time to time. You don’t need a whole lot of space and the planters can be made of anything that will hold the soil and can freely drain out of the bottom. I have noticed local buy and sell websites and groups often have postings for cheap or free containers that can be used. Over the years for my birthday I have been given self-watering planters which I prefer. I have also collected a few bag containers which are great. They work well during the growing season and are very easy to store during the winter. If your looking for a more economical way to use self-watering containers and bags you can make your own with materials such as storage totes, reusable bags and children’s pools all of which can be found at big box stores. One of the limitations of container gardening is when the weather gets really warm they tend to dry out faster than my garden beds as their volume smaller. The benefit of self-watering containers is they have a water reserve in the bottom and can wick water up as the plants need it. Using a wicking bed is also a great way to conserve water as it is drawn up through the soil and used by the plants there is far less evaporation on the soils surface. Add in a mulch layer and you are not only feeding the soil but conserving even more water. In order to help the wicking process I use a combination of soilless potting mix and compost or vermicompost. Usually at a 1:1 ratio but if you’re short on compost or have to purchase it you can go down to a 3 part soilless mix 1 part compost mixture and it will do just fine. The soilless potting mix will help wick and retain the moisture and the compost will provide the nutrient the plants need to grow. When I have vermicompost available I add it to the mix as it adds nutrient rich castings, increases water retention and the live compost worms will continue to add beneficial organisms and plant growth hormone while braking down any mulch you have left them. It has been my experience that the compost provides more than enough nutrients and fertilizers are generally not required throughout my growing season. You can grow a wide variety of annuals in containers. This year on my deck I will be growing tomatoes, peas, peppers, and a variety of herbs for the kitchen including basil, cilantro, thyme and rosemary. I like having the herbs we use more often closer to the kitchen and snacks like cherry tomatoes at hand. Our last frost date has passed and the established plants are hardened off. I like to plant both adult plants and direct sow seeds. Having adult plants lets me harvest right away while the seeds will provide crops later in the season. I like to plant as many different crops as I can in the containers filling every little space. A wide variety of crops using all of the available space increases harvests, reduces predation as it is usually a Polyculture and the canopy helps prevent unnecessary evaporative water loss while out competing weeds that may blow in. I plant my tomatoes and larger plants at the back to avoid shading and take advantage of the air space over the edge of the container to add more usable space. Containers are a great way to grow invasive plants like mint that if left alone could take over large areas in the garden. I have planted some mint as a ground cover for my honey berries and have dedicated this container completely to mint. Many perennials also make a great container plants. This year I have added a dwarf grape vine and two fig trees to my container honey berries. These perennials are not in self-watering containers and will need the nutrients over time so I have used a compost heavy mix made of free and local resources. These perennials will need a little more protection over the winter as there is less soil to insulate the roots. I will bring most of the more sensitive plants into the garage while the more hardy ones I will insulate with fall leaves and snow.
How to Measure your Soil pH Cheap and Easy
 
06:27
Soil pH is one of the most important factors that can be overlooked in the garden. pH has impacts on the availability of nutrients and of the plants ability to take them up. If the pH of your garden soil is not in the optimal range for the plants you are trying to grow you may end up having issues. Often plants grown in a soil that does not have the optimal pH don’t produce or if they do their harvests are low while the plant may looks stressed. On today’s joint episode between the Testing Garden Assumptions and Urban Garden Series I am going to take a look at soil pH, how to easily measure it and how you can adjust the pH over time if need be. pH is measured in a 14 point scale with 0 being the most acidic 7 neutral and 14 the most basic. Testing Garden Assumptions Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH3UTGH_3UAG6cB8NnlO8M1U Urban Gardening Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH0wwN-9IQ--WX-C-4JqTR-7 References: University of Vermont pH requirements for plant growth reference sheet: http://pss.uvm.edu/ppp/pubs/oh34.htm
Planning Your First Raised Bed Garden using Square Foot Gardening for Beginners
 
05:24
In the last video for beginners we touched on raised bed gardening for beginners.  We left of having just filled the beds with great soil and mulching them.  Its time to plan your garden and on today’s episode I will take you through the process I go through every year. Alexander Make a List of the Plants you Want to Grow Making a list your first year can be a daunting task. Start by listing the fruits and vegetables you enjoy eating. Pick out plants that are annuals. Annuals are fruits and vegetables that only produce in the first year and then die out. Perennials are plants that once planted will come back year after year. Usually you don’t want to move them once planted. By picking annuals in your first year you to learn how things grow without having to commit to perennials if you don’t want to. If you have kids it’s a good time to think about what they may want to snack on. Now it’s time to go to your preferred online seed store for some information. Generally speaking I go to www.rareseeds.com and www.weastcoastseeds.com Mark ones that need to be started early in the house Some plants you will need to start in the house or purchase starts from your green house. It is usually much cheaper to start your own in a south facing window or under shop lights. To find out which plants need to be started inside online vendors or the back of seed packages will give recommendations on when to plant the crop. I generally write these dates down on my list so I start them on time. You may have to adjust the dates if your last frost date is earlier or later then the seed package. If you’re not sure what your last frost date it’s a quick google search of your community with the term “last frost date” beside it. Usually its fairly quick to find.
How to Make Organic Fruit Tea
 
03:56
I love making my own organic fruit tea to help me pass the winter months. The best part is it is simple to grow and make your own tea at home. All you need is some soil, light, space and time. I use mint as the teas base and add fruit such as raspberries, strawberries and even blueberries although most fruit will make a great tea! Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden/
How and Why I Use Eggshells to Fertilize my Organic Garden
 
05:49
How I use Eggshells to fertilize my Organic Garden. Over the last year I have been investigating the science behind garden practices methods and products in the Testing Garden Assumptions Series. As a part of this series I have taken a look at a number of resources often sighted as being able to be used to fertilize your garden. I focused on free and local resources because I wanted to see if I could be a little more sustainable and hopefully fertilize my garden for years to come for free. In order to analyze the fertilizer potential of a material I look at two main areas. The organic macro nutrients such as Nitrogen Phosphorus and Potassium that are required in higher concentrations and the trace elements or micro nutrients that are equally as important however required in significantly smaller concentrations. Plants require or gain benefit from 21 elements of these 15 are commonly tested for in our analysis. Of the 6 remaining some are not commonly tested for while others such as Carbon, Oxygen and Hydrogen are gasses that are in consistent concentrations in our atmosphere. So far free and local resources that have shown fertilizer potential are Coffee Grounds, Tea Leaves, Comfrey, Autumn Leaves, Wood ash or Woodchips and even Human Urine. Today I thought I would take a look at another commonly recommended organic amendment Eggshells. The main recommendation is that eggshells are made primarily of Calcium Carbonate and calcium is required by many plants and is critical for things such as healthy tomato production helping to avoid things like blossom end rot. The assumption that eggshells have high concentrations of calcium is quite correct. Researchers in the Netherlands had eggshells from a number of sources analyzed and found that the concentration of calcium in eggshells averaged around 390 mg/g or 39% of the shell. The calcium in eggshells is not immediately available to plants. It needs to be in its elemental form as appose to the calcium carbonate. Some sources recommend treating eggshells with vinegar or acetic acid to release the calcium. Unfortunately while egg shells will react with vinegar it does not release the elemental calcium it simply binds it and neutralizes the acid. Related Videos: Testing Garden Assumptions Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5mfR-r4BXH3UTGH_3UAG6cB8NnlO8M1U References: Research paper from the Netherlands: http://ps.oxfordjournals.org/content/79/12/1833.short Other interesting research: http://www.hi-tm.com/RFA/food-path-summ.pdf http://www.planetnatural.com/composter-connection/compost-concerns/pathogens/ http://web.extension.illinois.edu/homecompost/science.cfm http://www.medicaldaily.com/heating-municipal-waste-55-degree-celsius-can-kill-antibiotic-resistant-bacteria-234959 Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Planting Coffee and Olives Seeds in the Alberta Urban Garden
 
04:22
Some of my favorite childhood memories are of gardening with my parents and brothers. This channel is about low cost organic urban gardening in zone 3. I am by no means an expert gardener however I love to share my experiments and journey garden year round. Please feel free to join the conversation and if you think you might like this channel subscribe. Have a great day! Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Is Epsom Salt Beneficial for Organic Gardening?
 
07:32
Can Epsom salt fix Magnesium deficiencies? Can you Fight Diseases by the Foliar Application of Epsom Salt? Does Epsom Salt help Increase Nutrient Absorption and Yields of garden Plants? Will it help me Grow Tastier Tomatoes and Sweeter Fruit? Dr. Linda Chalker-Scotts paper on Epsom Salt http://puyallup.wsu.edu/~Linda%20Chalker-Scott/Horticultural%20Myths_files/Myths/magazine%20pdfs/EpsomSalts.pdf If your into Organic Gardening and a part of one of the many online communities you have no doubt come across claims surrounding the use of Epsom salt in the garden. As you know I have been putting garden practices and claims to the test to see which ones are supported by science and which ones are not. For example the science behind the use of coffee grounds in the garden is supported whereas the use of cold coffee to fertilize and lower the pH around your blueberries is not. Today we are going to see if Epsum salt really good for your garden? Epsom salt is made of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) when dissolved in water it releases Magnesium and Sulphur. Magnesium and Sulphur are both essential elements for plant growth and production. Magnesium playing a key role in chlorophyll and sulphur plays a key role in amino acids. [2][3] It would seem logical that more Magnesium and Sulphur in the soil would help your plants and support these claims right? Lets talk about a few of these claims and for the purpose of discussion focus on Magnesium. Magnesium Deficiencies Thumbnail Credit: http://www.urban-wellness.ca/rmt-tip-the-epsom-salt-bath/
Grow a lot of Food in a Small Garden - 10 easy tips
 
09:41
The core goal of the Urban Garden Series is to show you how to grow more food at home. Often back yards, decks, patios and balconies space is limited and so today I am going to go through 10 ways to grow more food in the same space. 0:41 Vertical Growing 1:43 Food Producing Ground Cover 3:02 High Density Planting 3:47 Locally Acclimated Varieties 4:20 Succession Planting 4:50 Planting on your Compost Pile 6:28 Container Gardening 7:14 High Producing Crops 8:05 Food Producing Landscaping 9:00 Planting in Public Areas
Potato Growing Hack to Double Harvests
 
02:49
potatoes are one of my favorite crops to grow and harvest in my urban garden. Today I am going to show you how I grow my potatoes and double my harvest without having to increase the number of grow bags or space needed. I start my potatoes in grow bags in the garage usually 4 weeks before the last frost usually in early April. I fill the bags with 1/2 potting mix and 1/2 compost. The compost feeds the plants while the potting mix holds water. I fill them 3/4 the way full. I then toss a whole seed potato in the soil and just cover it completely. If the eyes are large enough I allow some of the eyes to poke above the soil. Those eyes will form the plant. The extra bag is fairly easy to roll down helping to prevent shading the early growth. it is important to start your potatoes as early as you can in order for this method to work. During the day I bring the potatoes out onto the drive way returning them at night until the last frost. Once the threat of frost has passed I put them in the garden area. When the plants are 30cm or 12 inches tall I add more compost and potting soil to mound them. This protects the potatoes growing below from greening which ruins them and can cause irritation if eaten. I don't fill the bags however all of the way though and you will see why in a minute. Before I get to the tip to double the potato harvest I would like to speak about potatoes in general. Most seed potatoes you can purchase such as these Rosemarie, which are pink and Purple Magic are determinant varieties. What that means is you plant them and they put on one crop all at the same time. The rosemarie potatoes are a faster producing than the purple magic helping me spread the harvests out. I should be able to harvest these from Mid-July through to late September. In order to spread out the harvest and double up on crops I have done a few things. The first is doubling up on the crop I get per bag. These two varieties are determinant so the first plant I just hilled will only produce one crop below where we hilled up the soil. Meaning you can plant another seed potato above the first effectively allowing you to double up your plants per container and hence the harvest. So when hilling I don't fill the bags all the way and plant the second seed potato again with some eyes pointing up. After these plants grow I will top off the containers. I dont do this with all of my potato bags. In fact I chose these 11 litre or 3 gallon 100 percent recycled fabric pots so that I can harvest them earlier than the ones I doubled up on. As you all know I love to spread my harvest out. It is time to harvest the double bags when the second plant begins to die back. This method can be done if you are growing your potatoes in raised beds or rows. Simply hill your potatoes and plant the new seeds between the plants. Container Potato Growing Episode: https://youtu.be/vVHADGKNx9M Container Growing for Beginners: https://youtu.be/TdIFU9301oE Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden/
Is Chicken Manure Safe to use in the Garden?
 
05:14
Chickens as domestic animals have a long history and likely originated in Asia somewhere around 8000 years ago. [1] They are common place on many farms and acreages providing a variety of services including food, waste disposal and their manure and bedding can be source of material for compost. On today’s Testing Garden Assumptions series video I am going to evaluate if chicken manure and bedding as a source of nutrients for your garden and if it is safe to use. [1] History of Domestic Chickens: http://archaeology.about.com/od/domestications/qt/chicken.htm [2] Nutrient content of Manures http://www.jswconline.org/content/57/6/470.short [3] Fertilizer Burn https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fertilizer_burn [4] Composting Chicken Manure to Kill Pathogens http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S096085240100133X [5] Mortality Composting http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2006.03274.x/full Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden/
How to Build an Trellis using Electrical Conduit Simple and Cheap
 
04:36
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden This is great for peas, melons, squash, pumpkin, beans and much much more. Growing in raised beds is a fantastic way to grow fruits and vegetables in the comfort of your back yard. That said you are restricted to grow along the ground unless you take advantage of the third dimension and grow vertically. There are many plants like grapes, melons, cucumbers, beans and pees that can take over large areas if left on the ground chocking out their neighbours. But if given a trellis to climb or be supported by they can take over the area they need to prosper while allowing their neighbours to thrive as well. In my case I chose to grow vertically with a structure called a trellis. the term trellis is a very board term for a architectural structure that is mean to support climbing plants. They can be made of a wide variety of materials including metal wood and even plants such as the three sisters planting method where by climbing beans use the stalk of corn to climb.  In my garden I have used two types of trellis. The first I built off of my fence. I built it to permanently support my heirloom grape vines that I got from my grandfathers. This is a more permanent structure and cost a little more to make. Today I am going to show to how to build a very cost effective one that I use for my annuals that can be moved quite quickly and simply.  Before we get started you will need some materials you can find at any large box store. Today Ill be building a 1.2 meter or 4 foot tall by 3.0 meter or 10 foot wide. For this trellis you will need the following: 2x 3 meter or 10 foot 1.27cm or 1/2 inch galvanized electrical conduit and 2 corner brackets  With an optional centre support of 5 foot and a T bracket  2 x 1.2 meter or 4 foot 1.27cm or 1/2 inch rebar if you wish you can get coated however it is not required finally vinyl tomato netting and zip ties.  as luck would have it they generally come in 10 foot by 4 foot panels.   You will need a pipe cutter, drill, marker and painting tape to do this job.  measure the lengths of pipe. I use a marker to make the first mark and painting tape to ensure the measurement is all around the pipe.  The brackets will add length to the whole frame.  If your restricted for space like I am make sure to remove the excess.  The corner brackets I have add 1.5” and 3” for the T bracket.  Cut the first pipe in half to give you two 5 foot lengths. These will make the vertical supports. The optional centre support is the same length. The optional centre bracket will require two more cuts. first remove the 3” the bracket will take up and then cut it in half. If you are building the trellis to fit in a specific location make sure to dry fit everything in place prior to securing them together. To attach the pieces together simply requires a flat surface and your drill. Make sure the pieces are as close into the brackets as possible. once you are sure hold firmly and use your drill to drive the screw home. be careful not to strip the screw. After you have the frame together it is time to put the tomato netting on. a 4 foot wide netting is usually available at big box stores of your local green house. The reason I have selected a 4 foot tall for the trellis is it is strong enough to hold a 32lbs pumpkin I grew a few years back but it also means the tomato netting is all one piece. The electrical conduit and vinyl as a materials are strong enough to take a lot of weight while flexible enough to not break while under weight. you can tie the netting to the trellis using the lose ends however I chose to use zip ties. They are easy to use, hold well and are extremely strong. The trellis portion is done now. Its time to install it in the garden. For this you will need the rebar and if required sledge hammer. Use the trellis to mark the location for the rebar. Place the rebar on the marked location and drive it into the ground. I usually sink it half way. This gives the trellis sufficient anchoring both above and below ground. If you would like a marker you can use the painting tape from cutting the pipe  simply place the pipe on top of the rebar. You won't need to worry about any other support as the soil below your garden will keep the trellis up and the length above will be more then enough to keep the trellis up.
How to build Raised Garden Beds on a Slope or Hillside Easy, Simple and Free or Cheap
 
09:39
Building raised beds can be simple if your are on flat land. What happens if you have a slope where you need to put the beds? Here is the solution. There are some challenges but with some time and ingenuity you can build some great raised beds. This how-to video shows how you deal with the challenges of building on a slope. This project was completely free as the lumber and screws were reclaimed from other projects. Slopes can be a great advantage in gardening. If your slope is south facing that can make growing conditions similar to one gardening zone to the south! I will be using these raised beds for the Home Garden field trial testing the effectiveness of Rock Dust and Biochar on vegetables. Some of my favorite childhood memories are of gardening with my parents and brothers. This channel is about low cost organic urban gardening in zone 3. I am by no means an expert gardener however I love to share my experiments and journey garden year round. Please feel free to join the conversation and if you think you might like this channel subscribe. Have a great day! Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Does the Chlorine in Tap Water Harm Beneficial Bacteria?
 
07:53
Does chlorine in tap water harm beneficial microbes and bacteria in my garden soil? Will the bacteria recover quickly? How much chlorine is in tap or city water? Should I remove chlorine from my tap, drinking or city water? Soil Bacterial Count Lab Report: http://www.albertaurbangarden.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/150604_AlbertaUrbanGardenCertificateofAnalysis-RevisedReportCityWaterSoilTests.pdf City Water Chlorine Lab Report: http://www.albertaurbangarden.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/150604_AlbertaUrbanGardenCertificateofAnalysis-CityWaterInitialChlorine.pdf Epcor http://www.epcor.com/water/water-quality/reports-edmonton/Pages/reports.aspx Bacteria Found in Tap Water: https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jsme2/30/1/30_ME14123/_pdf I have noticed over the years that people recommend watering the garden with water that does not have chlorine in it such as Tap water. The premise of this statement is the bacteria I your soil are a key player in the nutrient cycle and chlorine kills bacteria. So today I thought today I would test this garden assumption. The water treatment plant that provides my drinking water has been recognized as using the gold standard for water treatment. After getting the water from the North Saskatchewan River it is initially shocked with Sodium hypochlorite or bleach. This does a great job at killing bacteria and other pathogens that may be in the water. The downside to using bleach is the chlorine decays rather fast once in contact with the water and air. In order to keep the water safe while shipping ammonia is added to the water creating chloramine. This essentially stabilizes the clean water until it gets to you to make sure it is safe for you to drink. It is really important to note that even at the highest levels the chemicals used to sterilize and stabilize the drinking water here in Alberta are several orders of magnitude below what is considered to be mildly irritating to humans.
Container Gardening For Beginners -- Perennial Fruits
 
07:31
Growing perennials in containers is not difficult and allows those with limited space such as a deck, patio or balcony to enjoy their produce. 0:24 The Benefits of Perennials 0:32 The Benefits of Container Gardening 0:40 Types of perennial fruit producing crops that does well in containers 1:23 Container size 2:31 Soil for perennials in containers 3:20 Feeding and fertilizing during the season 4:29 Long term maintenance of potted perennials 5:18 Winter protection (high zone and hardy) 6:28 Bringing Plants in during the Winter 6:54 Leaving the Plant outside 7:12 Closing Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden/
Build Fantastic Soil and Fertilize using Leaf Mold (compost) made from Autumn Leaves and Wood chips
 
06:18
This time of year it is a great time to start preparing your soil for the next growing season. A few weeks ago I spoke about how I prepare my garden beds using mulch to add fertility over the winter. After putting down mulch on all of my garden beds and making my hot compost I was left with a few bags of autumn leaves. With this surplus today I thought I would show you how I make leaf mold and some of the value its use in the garden can bring. What is Leaf Mold? Leaf mold is compost that is made when fungi are responsible for the decomposition process of high carbon materials such as autumn leaves. [1] The key benefit of leaf mold is that it when completed it contains humus. Adding humus to soil helps alleviate soil compaction improving root penetration. Humus helps bring air, water and nutirents into the soil while acting as a habitat for bacteria. At a cellular level humus is the hollowed out shells of once living cells that act as a sponge in the soil holding moisture and nutrients in place that would otherwise leach out. Leaves also come with a large number of essential and beneficial elements. Trees take up the nutrients from the soil and subsoil and incorporate them into the wood and the leaves. As the leaves fall in the autumn those elements are left in the tissue. Last year we tested 4 common species of autumn leaves in my area including Birch, poplar, apple and russian olive. Maxxam analytics found that leaves have 10/15 commonly tested for trace elements that are essential or beneficial for plant growth. The additional nutrients are easily incorporated into the nutrient cycle as the leaves break down. This is important as the same elements from the parent material that originally formed the soil in my area has taken over 10,000 years to release nutrients to the soil and as the soil is close to chemical equilibrium the process has slowed. The fungi that dominated the decomposition process of our leaves will once applied to the garden help support the fungal populations in the soil to break down complex organic matter. Fungi can also form a mycorrhizal relationship with plants allowing them to access harder to reach nutrients and water. In order to make sure that fungi are responsible for breaking down the leaf or woodchip material it is fairly simple. All you need to provide to make leaf mold is three factors carbon in the form of leaves, fungi and moisture. The simplest method to make leaf mold is take a carbon rich source like autumn leaves or woodchips and simply pile them in an area of the garden where they will not get in the way. Usually you don’t need a nitrogen source but if you do it will speed up the decomposition process a little. You don’t have to worry about applying fungi to the leaf pile. Your garden already has spores all over and they will inoculate the pile. Lab Results: Autumn Leaves: http://www.albertaurbangarden.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/150110_AlbertaUrbanGardenCertificateofAnalysis-RevistedReport.pdf References: [1] Definition of Leaf Mold https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaf_mold [2] Definition of Humus http://education.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/humus/ [3] Humus https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humus [4] Wood Ash Fertilizer Potential http://learningstore.uwex.edu/assets/pdfs/A3635.pdf [5] Parent Material Degradation https://passel.unl.edu/pages/informationmodule.php?idinformationmodule=1130447038 Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Build Soil Fertility with Leaf Based Compost made from Free and Local Resources
 
06:57
On todays episode we are going to show you how to make a leaf based compost with all free or recycled materials. The use of compost is one of the pillars of my gardening technique. Composted material including mulch helped me achieve a long term goal of requiring no store bough fertilizers in my garden last year. If done right the compost will continue to add to the nutrient cycle in the soil allowing for healthy beneficial organism growth and plant growth and disease resistance. This fall I have been busy collecting leaves from my yard and some of my friends places. Leafs are a great resources for creating a hot compost. They are considered a brown ingredient for compost and usually is a free resource most people pay to get taken away. When building the enclosure for the compost its important to think of a few things, air, size and access. The bacteria that are going to do all the hard work need air. Picking a material that allows for air flow helps keep them happy. I am using this plastic fencing that I had left over from creating my garden fence. Ill use some repurposed survey stakes to give hold it up initially. For the full transcript go to www.albertaurbangarden.ca Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Transplanting and Growing Wild Blueberries at Home Alberta Urban Garden
 
04:30
Some of my favorite childhood memories are of gardening with my parents and brothers. This channel is about low cost organic urban gardening in zone 3. I am by no means an expert gardener however I love to share my experiments and journey garden year round. Please feel free to join the conversation and if you think you might like this channel subscribe. Have a great day! Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
12 Easy Tips To Save Money While Gardening
 
05:54
Today I thought I would share some quick tips that I use to help save money while gardening. I love gardening for a lot of reasons. It is a source of enjoyment that serves as a wonderful classroom for my son and it helps me save some money. While I have invested in building my garden this is the time of year it starts to pay me back in produce. 0:28 Reduce the Cost of Groceries 1:06 Focus on High Cost Crops 1:18 Free and Local Fertilizer Resources 2:00 Make Free Garden Soil 2:08 Using Rain Water to Save Money 2:43 Reusing Water from the Kitchen in the Garden 2:53 Save Seeds to Save Money 3:05 Starting your own Seedlings Saves Money 3:32 Investing in Perennial Fruit and Nut Producing Plants 3:51 Propagating Perennials to Save Money 4:08 Process Crops to Higher Value Products 4:43 Building from Recycled or Naturally Sources Materials
Does Biochar Retain Nutrients in the Soil?
 
09:32
So far, as part our biochar field trial, I’ve shared lab results that indicate show no significant difference in pH but had more phosphorus and nitrogen than the control. Today I'll be sharing lab results that address a fundamental Biochar product claim - namely, that it holds nutrients and reduces nutrient leaching from the soil. We’ll also see if a pepper grown in biochar amended soil is more nutrient dense than one grown in the same base soil with no biochar added. In order to evaluate these claims, soil and tissue samples were submitted to a lab for trace element analysis. The lab results will be posted on my website at http://www.albertaurbangarden.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/141120_AlbertaUrbanGardenCertificateofAnalysis.pdf Related Episodes: Does Rock Dust Increase the Nutrient Density of Food? http://youtu.be/mwF3TFOzIik Total Alberta Urban Garden Trial Harvest Results http://youtu.be/jaEEhyyW7Nk One Yard Revolution Brix Testing http://youtu.be/qpL6zqe25-k Does a Brix Meter Read Nutrient Density? http://youtu.be/YO4L_jSxsAc pH and Nutrient Availability http://youtu.be/eGxfOVG-TsQ A special thanks to Maxxam for helping us run the samples. For all of your analytical needs go to www.maxxam.ca Some of my favorite childhood memories are of gardening with my parents and brothers. This channel is about low cost organic urban gardening in zone 3. I am by no means an expert gardener however I love to share my experiments and journey garden year round. Please feel free to join the conversation and if you think you might like this channel subscribe. Have a great day! Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
How to Press Apple Cider using Rescued Fruit and an Antique Cider Mill
 
06:41
It is the middle of August and the early ripening apples are ready in Alberta. Generally you can tell when apples are ready when they come off with a light touch and or taste sweet. Unfortunately you can also tell when large numbers of apples fall off the tree by themselves. This leads me to a problem I would like to help solve. There are many fruit trees this time of year with piles of fallen and rotting fruit at the base. When have spoken the trees owners they often just cant use the produce or cant harvest it. Inspired by groups like Operation Fruit Rescue out of Edmonton I went to social media looking for apples to rescue and wow was I surprised with the immediate response.. So I went collecting apples as fast as I could. With so many apples that don’t have a long storage life my solution was to make cider. At the suggestion of my father I found a working antique cider crusher and press or a Cider Mill. As luck would have it last month I found just the piece all the way in Southern Ontario. The mill I found was restored by a fellow named Lorne whom had rescued it from an antique shop. Using reclaimed lumber from a neighboring Victorian Farm house he painstakingly resorted it to working condition over a 3 month period. My parents were in the area and were kind enough to drive it 4500km or 2800 miles to Alberta. I now could process the abundant amount of fruit I have collected. Once I got the mill home, installed in my shed and thoroughly cleaned I took some time to research the piece. As it would happen the cast Iron pieces were cast in 1866 making them 149 years old… that is older than the confederation of Canada! I will continue to research this peace as I want to know the full history of my press. Before I started to use the cider mill I made sure to lubricate any of the moving parts with vegetable oil. Vegetable oil is food safe so if it falls in your cider it won’t harm anything but it also works as a great lubricant that is not likely to cause rust issues while preventing damaging friction. When using apples to make juice or cider you first have to crush the fruit. The first few years I did this using a cold press juicer. The trouble being it was electric, had a small opening requiring you to cut the apples up, required clean outs often and it did not do a great job getting every drop of juice out of the pulp. The mill can do the same work, that took many nights with the juicer, in a matter of an hour. After installing a temporary hopper I simply loaded whole apples and turned the crank. The crusher works by spinning tines that grab the apples and mash then through a set of blades. Once the chunks have gone through that there is a set of cogs below that mash them further before dropping them into the barrel. Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/
Garden Myth or Fact Does Tap Water Harm Beneficial Soil Bacteria?
 
04:36
There is a recommendation out there to avoid using tap water in the garden because the chlorine in the water harms beneficial bacterial in your soil. Last Year’s Video Last year in the testing garden assumptions series I took on this claim in my garden. In order to test this assumption I took a variety of samples to Maxxam Analytics for analyse. I sent in a untreated control and samples where the soil had been treated a number of different ways using tap water. Maxxam then analysed the bacterial colonies to see if treating the soil with tap water would result in a reduction in the concentrations of bacteria in the soil. I rarely use tap water so the populations of bacteria are likely robust and represent species that are both sensitive and resistant to chlorine and everything in between. Although not all of the bacteria in my soil can be cultured the ones that can be should be representative enough to allow us to determine if the chorine in tap water was going to kill bacteria. I found in last year’s video that there was no noted difference in bacterial numbers when comparing the control to the extreme situation of 0.5 grams being put directly into tap water. When I completed this study I had a hard time finding any peer reviewed research supporting or refuting these results. Recently I ran across a paper I thought I would share today. Peer reviewed research: For a long time researchers have hypothesized that tap water even after all of the treatment had bacteria in it. A recent paper in the Journal of Microbes and Environments had a paper from researchers from Lund University in Sweden that took a look at fresh tap water to see if there were any bacteria in it. They took a look at drinking water distribution systems and using next-generation genetic sequencing went about looking for bacteria. This method does not require you to be able to grow the bacteria in the lab to count it rather is kills everything and uses the DNA to figure out what was in the water. The researchers found millions of bacteria in the tap water... References: [1] Bacteria Found in Tap Water: https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jsme2/30/1/30_ME14123/_pdf [2] Epcor http://www.epcor.com/water/water-quality/reports-edmonton/Pages/reports.aspx [3] How Chlorine Kills Bacteria http://www.livescience.com/37122-how-chlorine-kills-pool-germs.html Lab Reports: Soil Bacterial Count Lab Report: http://www.albertaurbangarden.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/150604_AlbertaUrbanGardenCertificateofAnalysis-RevisedReportCityWaterSoilTests.pdf City Water Chlorine Lab Report: http://www.albertaurbangarden.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/150604_AlbertaUrbanGardenCertificateofAnalysis-CityWaterInitialChlorine.pdf Related Episodes: Does the Chlorine in Tap Water Harm Beneficial Bacteria? https://youtu.be/tgvlE8YM1xI Photo Credits Open Source for use as per Google Search DNA Helix https://pixabay.com/en/dna-biology-medicine-gene-163466/ Vial and DNA Helix http://research.webometrics.info DNA Sequence in Gel https://www.flickr.com/photos/micahb37/3080247531 Cultured Bacteria https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Growth_medium
Winter Gardening in Zone 3 Overwintering Leafy Greens
 
03:58
on todays episode we are going to check in on our winter greens to see how they are doing. Related Episodes: How to Build a Cold Frame for Free: http://youtu.be/iN1wZ4NTtM8 How to use a cold frame: http://youtu.be/yPo1NPh0BeE Planing and planting a winter garden: http://youtu.be/4WTW_53lXN4 Building a Hoop House Polytunnel and Cold Frames to Protect my Fall and Winter Garden http://youtu.be/oz0kx6ua87E We planted in late August a variety of leafy greens that are all cold hardy including Mache, Miners lettuce, winter blend and Sorrel . All of these varieties are extremely and should survive the winter if given some protection. So in the beginning of October we placed the cold frame on the plants and put the hoop house over it for the additional protection. When temperatures dropped to -7c or 19 F. This years weather has been a tad odd. We had the earliest frost in 10 years followed up by record highs a plunge to -40 and then record highs again. Its important to keep the snow off of the hoop house so the winter light can penetrate and heat the hoop house and cold frame. I usually wait for the snow to stop and the brush it off quickly. So lets take a look at the plants to see how they are doing. ill carefully move the plastic from the hoop house and open up the cold frame. It looks like the plants are doing well however they are not large enough to harvest this winter. Likely what has happened is two fold. the first is it gets cold here and the plants have stopped growing. To compound the issue there is limited direct sun. The sun in the winter is much lower in the sky then the summer and the shadow of the house likely what we have is some nice dormant plants even if there was a lot more direct sun. That is alright though. When the spring comes these plants will pop back much quicker and we should be harvesting much earlier in the season. Some improvements am going to make in the future are longer hoops to allow easier access into the cold frame and a vertical support across the top to help with the snow load. This is a great opportunity with the winter solstice approaching to take a look at the patters of the sun in my garden to determine the best place for a future winter garden. I will also start it a few weeks earlier to give the plans the chance to get large enough that even if not actively growing I can still harvest in the depths of winter. I thought I would end this video with a special good buy. I hope you have a fantastic and safe holiday season my friends! I have a lot planned for 2015 and I look forward to sharing my adventures with you. Some of my favorite childhood memories are of gardening with my parents and brothers. This channel is about low cost organic urban gardening in zone 3. I am by no means an expert gardener however I love to share my experiments and journey garden year round. Please feel free to join the conversation and if you think you might like this channel subscribe. Have a great day! Check us out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/stephenlegaree14 Webpage: www.albertaurbangarden.ca Google +: google.com/+StephenLegaree Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlbertaUrbanGarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/northern1485 Pintrest: http://www.pinterest.com/ABurbanGarden/

Cover letter for pharmacy intern position
Writing support service
Zheng yuan thesis examples
Reviews essay writing service
Civil service essay writing